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NEWS
April 21, 1990 | MICHAEL A. HILTZIK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Middle East Airways plane that leaves here every Wednesday for Beirut is generally fully booked as West Africa's Lebanese pile in for vacations and family visits in their troubled homeland. The cargo hold is also full, but amid the goods and supplies being flown to Lebanon, there is often a different kind of freight: coffins bearing the bodies of Lebanese whose families are sending them home for the last time--sometimes for the first time. "We don't bury them here," Msgr.
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WORLD
August 6, 2007 | Robyn Dixon, Times Staff Writer
NTSIKI Biyela looked curiously at the red liquid in her glass, wondering what to expect. She was listening to a connoisseur who swirled his glass about, passionately extolling the perfumes of blackberries and cigar box that she was supposed to be appreciating. Biyela smelled, as instructed, but there had never been any blackberries or cigar boxes in the Zulu village where she grew up, fetching water from the river and firewood from the forest every day. The liquid smelled alien.
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NEWS
July 17, 1990 | MICHAEL A. HILTZIK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Tanzania-Zambia Railway could well be a metaphor for Africa's path in the 1980s. Known as Tazara, the 1,100-mile, Chinese-built line linking the copper belt of Zambia to this Tanzanian port was turned over to the governments of the two abutting countries just before the decade began. Included were 128 new locomotives and hundreds of passenger and freight cars to run on the gleaming rails.
NEWS
March 12, 2002 | ANN M. SIMMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Congolese wine lover who has penetrated this country's exclusive wine industry wants to cultivate African palates while marketing what he hopes will be an outstanding product. Telecommunications tycoon Miko Rwayitare bought the small Mont Rochelle vineyard in the premier Western Cape viniculture region of Franschhoek last year. His main objective is to create a variety that will revolutionize the quality of South African wine and the way it is perceived both at home and abroad.
BUSINESS
November 13, 1997 | PAUL ALEXANDER, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Five soft-spoken youths nod in unison while tasting a 1995 Warwick pinot noir and listening to Jabulani Ntshangase detail its superior qualities over a lesser vintage they already tried. They are the first black students in Stellenbosch University's winemaking program. Ntshangase, who found his calling in the wine business while studying in the United States, pushed the idea and helped raise their tuition money.
NEWS
November 16, 1991 | MICHAEL A. HILTZIK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The subject was molasses. As a Swiss business consultant recalls it, her Italian clients were planning a molasses processing plant in Kenya when she was called to a meeting with representatives of several Kenyan Cabinet ministers and their bankers. To approve the project--designed largely to provide work for unemployed Kenyans--the ministers were demanding "commissions" of 10% each.
WORLD
August 6, 2007 | Robyn Dixon, Times Staff Writer
NTSIKI Biyela looked curiously at the red liquid in her glass, wondering what to expect. She was listening to a connoisseur who swirled his glass about, passionately extolling the perfumes of blackberries and cigar box that she was supposed to be appreciating. Biyela smelled, as instructed, but there had never been any blackberries or cigar boxes in the Zulu village where she grew up, fetching water from the river and firewood from the forest every day. The liquid smelled alien.
NEWS
March 12, 2002 | ANN M. SIMMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Congolese wine lover who has penetrated this country's exclusive wine industry wants to cultivate African palates while marketing what he hopes will be an outstanding product. Telecommunications tycoon Miko Rwayitare bought the small Mont Rochelle vineyard in the premier Western Cape viniculture region of Franschhoek last year. His main objective is to create a variety that will revolutionize the quality of South African wine and the way it is perceived both at home and abroad.
NEWS
February 4, 1992 | Reuters
At least 10 miners were killed and 16 were hurt Monday by falling rocks at a gold mine near Johannesburg, prompting union demands for an investigation. The mine owner, Anglo American Corp. of South Africa Ltd., said the accident occurred 7,800 feet below the surface at the Western Deep Levels mine after an earth temblor. About 700 miners, most of them black, died in accidents in South Africa's mining industry last year.
TRAVEL
July 18, 1999
Kenya, suffering a slump in tourist traffic, is waiving visas for short-term visitors. Americans who plan to stay less than 30 days in this East African nation, renowned for its game parks and safaris, will no longer have to pay the $50 visa fee, the Kenyan government announced. Last month, gunmen robbed two dozen American tourists aboard vans en route to the Masai Mara game park.
BUSINESS
November 13, 1997 | PAUL ALEXANDER, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Five soft-spoken youths nod in unison while tasting a 1995 Warwick pinot noir and listening to Jabulani Ntshangase detail its superior qualities over a lesser vintage they already tried. They are the first black students in Stellenbosch University's winemaking program. Ntshangase, who found his calling in the wine business while studying in the United States, pushed the idea and helped raise their tuition money.
NEWS
November 16, 1991 | MICHAEL A. HILTZIK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The subject was molasses. As a Swiss business consultant recalls it, her Italian clients were planning a molasses processing plant in Kenya when she was called to a meeting with representatives of several Kenyan Cabinet ministers and their bankers. To approve the project--designed largely to provide work for unemployed Kenyans--the ministers were demanding "commissions" of 10% each.
NEWS
July 17, 1990 | MICHAEL A. HILTZIK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Tanzania-Zambia Railway could well be a metaphor for Africa's path in the 1980s. Known as Tazara, the 1,100-mile, Chinese-built line linking the copper belt of Zambia to this Tanzanian port was turned over to the governments of the two abutting countries just before the decade began. Included were 128 new locomotives and hundreds of passenger and freight cars to run on the gleaming rails.
NEWS
April 21, 1990 | MICHAEL A. HILTZIK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Middle East Airways plane that leaves here every Wednesday for Beirut is generally fully booked as West Africa's Lebanese pile in for vacations and family visits in their troubled homeland. The cargo hold is also full, but amid the goods and supplies being flown to Lebanon, there is often a different kind of freight: coffins bearing the bodies of Lebanese whose families are sending them home for the last time--sometimes for the first time. "We don't bury them here," Msgr.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 31, 1988 | Leonard Klady \f7
Steven Spielberg called for a "return to the word" at the Oscars last year--but this? In the case of "Rainman" (a one-time Spielberg project), the Dustin Hoffman-Tom Cruise starrer at United Artists to film in April with Sydney Pollock directing, Outtakes estimates it's about $10,000 per page. Writer Barry Morrow's original script was so admired, it attracted the likes of Hoffman and director Marty Brest.
NEWS
January 7, 1998 | From Associated Press
On their last day alive, a South African woman and her American boyfriend visited a scenic wine area, then took in a movie in a trendy waterfront district. Hours later, Edward Keim III of Fort Lauderdale, Fla., and Marilese Van der Merwe were dead--among the latest victims in South Africa's crime wave. Police were investigating the killing of the couple, found shot to death several miles apart near a crime-ridden township Monday. Their burned-out BMW was nearby.
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