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OPINION
January 11, 2007
Re "Roots of anger," Current, Jan. 7 Tanya K. Hernandez's piece is filled with sweeping generalizations and accusations. She is way off when she refers to the killings and assaults by Latino gang members on unsuspecting African Americans as a "Latino ethnic cleansing of African Americans from multiracial neighborhoods." The people who are committing these horrendous acts are not representative of the Latino community. These delinquents are gang members. It is mind-boggling that Hernandez came up with the ignorant conclusion that the entire Latino culture is to blame.
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BUSINESS
March 26, 2014 | By Soumya Karlamangla and Chad Terhune
Latinos aren't the only sore spot for Covered California heading into Monday's enrollment deadline for Obamacare coverage. Very few African Americans have signed up statewide, and there's not much time to address the lackluster turnout. Wednesday, state officials reiterated that Monday remains the deadline for open enrollment. But the state will give Californians until April 15 to finish their application if they start it before midnight Monday. Thus far, fewer than 3% of health plan enrollees identify themselves as African American, and that number hasn't budged in weeks.
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BUSINESS
March 26, 2014 | By Soumya Karlamangla and Chad Terhune
Latinos aren't the only sore spot for Covered California heading into Monday's enrollment deadline for Obamacare coverage. Very few African Americans have signed up statewide, and there's not much time to address the lackluster turnout. Wednesday, state officials reiterated that Monday remains the deadline for open enrollment. But the state will give Californians until April 15 to finish their application if they start it before midnight Monday. Thus far, fewer than 3% of health plan enrollees identify themselves as African American, and that number hasn't budged in weeks.
SCIENCE
March 19, 2014 | By Melissa Healy, This post has been corrected, as indicated below.
Is there really a link between vaccine and autism, cellphones and cancer, the HIV virus and the CIA? Almost half of Americans believe the answer is yes for at least one of the many medical conspiracy theories that have circulated in recent years. And the attitudes and behavior of those conspiracists toward standard medical advice reflect that mistrust, says a study out this week. A pair of University of Chicago social scientists set out to determine the extent of "medical conspiracism" among the U.S. public and conducted a nationally representative online survey.
NEWS
April 9, 2013 | By Eryn Brown
One complaint leveled against genome studies is that they don't survey a broad enough swath of humankind. Though many projects have searched DNA collected from people of European descent -- hoping to ferret out which changes in what parts of the genome are linked to this disease or that -- fewer have investigated the genomes of other ethnic groups.  In 2011, Stanford University geneticist and MacArthur "genius" grant recipient Carlos Bustamante discussed...
SPORTS
April 16, 2009 | Dylan Hernandez
On the night every player in baseball wore No. 42 to celebrate the 62nd anniversary of Jackie Robinson breaking the color barrier in the major leagues, Orlando Hudson said that Robinson "would probably turn over in his grave" seeing how few African Americans are in the game. Hudson, who is African American, said he has had black kids tell him, "Orlando, I can't play that white man's game."
SPORTS
October 26, 2013 | By Bill Shaikin
ST. LOUIS -- In the year that the movie "42" dramatized the story of Jackie Robinson breaking baseball's color barrier, the number of African Americans playing in the World Series is the same as the number playing in the major leagues when Robinson made his debut in 1947: one. "It's sad to see," said Boston Red Sox outfielder Quintin Berry, the only African American on the roster of either team. The percentage of African Americans in the major leagues has declined from about 19% in 1984 to about 8% today . When the Tampa Bay Rays and Philadelphia Phillies met in the World Series five years ago , baseball officials were optimistic about turning the tide.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 27, 1995
The first day of Kwanzaa, a weeklong African American holiday, was celebrated Tuesday at a candlelighting ceremony at the Baldwin Hills Crenshaw Plaza. Dozens of African Americans, including local Christian and Nation of Islam leaders, crowded a conference room for the celebration sponsored by Kwanzaa Fest Inc. Organization. The ceremony featured seven young women (six pictured at right) nominated by the organization as the 1995 Kwanzaa Queens.
OPINION
February 21, 2007
Re "A sorry spectacle," editorial, and "The locker room closet," Current, Feb. 18 If there was any doubt that the recent comments by actor Isaiah Washington and retired pro basketball player Tim Hardaway reveal that a deep-rooted homophobia exists among some African Americans, one only needs to go back to the 2004 elections, when large numbers of religiously conservative blacks voted against their interests and for "values" issues such as constitutional bans...
ENTERTAINMENT
February 3, 2010 | By Rachel Abramowitz
Kathryn Bigelow sounds a wee bit tired of questions about being a "female director," but given that on Tuesday she became only the fourth woman to be nominated for best director by the Academy of Motion Pictures Arts and Sciences, she knows it comes with the territory. "I long personally for the day when the modifier is a moot point," said a very happy Bigelow, whose film nabbed nine nominations, including one for best picture. "I anticipate that day will come, but if 'The Hurt Locker' can make the impossible seem possible to somebody, it's pretty overwhelming and gratifying.
SPORTS
March 10, 2014 | By Houston Mitchell
Minnesota state representative Pat Garofalo has some questions to answer Monday after he sent out a tweet Sunday night that many people took as racist. The tweet:     Let's be honest, 70% of teams in NBA could fold tomorrow + nobody would notice a difference w/ possible exception of increase in streetcrime - Rep. Pat Garofalo (@PatGarofalo) March 9, 2014 Many people on Twitter perceived Garofalo's tweet as a shot at African Americans, since the majority of players in the NBA are black.
SPORTS
March 4, 2014 | By Houston Mitchell
Seattle Seahawks wide receiver Doug Baldwin is unhappy with the NFL for banning a particular racial slur during games next season, and has a reason for it that some may find unusual. “I think it's absurd,” Baldwin told the Tacoma News Tribune . “I understand Roger Goodell and his safety council, or whoever they are, they're trying to do this with good intentions. … Maybe. But, if you look at it, the only people who say the N-word on the football field are African Americans.
NEWS
March 3, 2014 | By Joel Silberman, guest blogger, This post has been corrected, as indicated below.
In the wake of a federal judge striking down Texas' gay marriage ban and Arizona Gov. Jan Brewer vetoing an anti-gay bill, I feel compelled to confess something uncomfortable: I was totally wrong about gay marriage. I never opposed gay marriage on principle. I have always believed -- and continue to believe -- that a legal contract available to one pair of people should also be available to another pair of people. Because of equality.  But after seeing how the words “gay marriage” fired up conservative voters in 2004, I found myself arguing with friends both gay and straight that it was the wrong issue at the wrong time.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 21, 2014 | Sandy Banks
Sixty years ago, the Wilfandel House in the West Adams district was a hub of high society for black Los Angeles. Back then, Negroes couldn't book rooms in posh hotels or upscale party venues. So the wives of dozens of successful black men formed a club and purchased a home in what then was one of the city's wealthiest neighborhoods. "Everybody who was anybody who lived in L.A. or came through town was entertained at the Wilfandel," recalled Heilindia Brown, a former club president.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 12, 2014 | By Greg Braxton
Hollywood still isn't reflecting the nation's diversity in its entertainment products, and that omission is costing the industry considerable amounts in lost revenues. That's the main conclusion of a comprehensive report about diversity in the film and TV industry released Wednesday by UCLA's Ralph J. Bunche Center for African American Studies. The study, which is titled "2014 Hollywood Diversity Report: Making Sense of the Disconnect," finds that minorities and women are represented far below their corresponding percentages in the general population.
OPINION
February 11, 2014 | By Betty DeRamus
Black History Month reminds me of a really great golden oldies station, always blaring the same handful of terrific tunes. Every February, it plays Martin Luther King Jr., Rosa Parks and Harriet Tubman soul - with a chorus or two of the George Washington Carver blues. Now don't get me wrong. This is my kind of history, and my kind of heroes, and I understand why we must tell every generation their stories. I just think that including some fresh tales too would produce a far fuller picture of how blacks enriched America.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 16, 1996 | KELLY DAVID
She may have been speaking in Yoruba, but it didn't take long for the hundreds of African Americans gathered Saturday in Oxnard for Juneteenth celebrations to figure out what she was saying. "Sha ala fia ni," Ventura College history instructor Ola Washington shouted in the Nigerian language. Translation: "What's happening?" After Washington coached the audience on the response, "adube," or "By the help of God, all is well," several took up her cue and replied in Yoruba.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 30, 2014 | By Gary Goldstein
"The Great Flood," an all-archival clip documentary revisiting the events and effects of the devastating Mississippi River flood of 1927, is by turns hypnotic, playful, wildly evocative and even a bit trippy. But most of all it's a unique, highly immersing audio-visual experience that would be as at home in a museum as it is in a movie theater - and that's a first-order compliment. Experimental filmmaker Bill Morrison ("Decasia," "The Miners' Hymns") has masterfully assembled a collage of silent, monochrome archival footage of this largely forgotten catastrophe - call it the Hurricane Katrina of its day - in which the Mississippi's levees broke in 145 places, engulfing 27,000 square miles of land from southern Illinois to New Orleans.
OPINION
January 24, 2014 | By The Times editorial board
When the Supreme Court struck down a key portion of the Voting Rights Act last year, it seemed impossible that a divided Congress would be able to agree on new legislation that would satisfy the court's concerns and restore robust enforcement of the landmark civil rights law. But a creative new proposal may confound the cynics. Last June, the court by a 5-4 vote struck down the formula used in the Voting Rights Act to determine which states and localities must "pre-clear" voting procedures with the Justice Department or a federal court in Washington.
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