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May 30, 1987 | LEAH GOLDMAN
Viewing a museum exhibition can often be like looking through a telescope. A curator points and focuses the instrument to reveal and clarify a particular subject, be it artist, period or style. Through Aug. 16, the San Diego Museum of Art is offering its visitors the expansive vision through a prism, rather than a narrow, telescopic gaze, with its exhibition, "Perspectives: Angles on African Art."
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October 3, 2013 | By Susan King
The inaugural South African Arts Festival 2013 is bringing a sample of that country's film and music to downtown Los Angeles from Friday through Sunday. Besides a day of film panel discussions at the Omni Hotel on Saturday, the festival will screen six films Sunday at the Regal Cinemas L.A. Live Stadium 14 that were selected by the National Film and Video Foundation of South Africa. All films are free, but reservations are required. THE ENVELOPE: Full film festival coverage Among the diverse slate of films are "Felix," a family film that is described as "Billy Elliott" with African jazz; the acclaimed drama "Otelo Burning," about a group of township kids who find joy in surfing; and "The African Cypher," a documentary about South African b-boys.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 8, 2008 | Joe Holley, Holley is a writer for the Washington Post, where this report first appeared.
Warren M. Robbins, founder of the Museum of African Art, forerunner to the Smithsonian's National Museum of African Art, died Dec. 4 at George Washington University Hospital of complications from a fall at his home last month. He was 85. When he started the Museum of African Art in 1964, Robbins had never been to Africa, never worked in a museum, never been involved with the arts and never raised money.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 24, 2013 | By Liesl Bradner
In 1928, William Nickerson Jr., along with Norman Houston and George Beavers, founded the Golden State Mutual Life Insurance Co. in Los Angeles to provide insurance to black people unable to purchase policies from white-owned institutions. The company flourished, evolving into one of the largest black-owned insurance companies west of the Mississippi. Through the years, the company amassed an extensive assemblage of African American art, one of the biggest corporate-owned collections in the nation.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 27, 1993 | CHRISTOPHER KNIGHT, TIMES ART CRITIC
The new Museum for African Art has opened with an exhibition that does double duty. Articulated with a variety of often arresting masks, architectural sculptures, textiles, reliquary objects and a carved and painted dance enclosure, its fascinating subject is secrecy. A variety of African cultures make objects that declare the presence of secret knowledge, while simultaneously keeping the secret hidden.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 13, 1988 | WILLIAM WILSON
Life is a messy junk heap of mixed facts, fantasies, wishes and realities. Our poor minds can't make sense of it unless we sort things into piles of stuff that seem to be alike, rusty tin cans over here, bicycle handlebars there, discarded toys in the middle. This pigeon-holing is absolutely necessary to our function as human animals, and our ability to generalize is one of our saving talents. Unfortunately, it is also the way we arrive at stereotype and prejudice.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 25, 1991 | SUZANNE MUCHNIC, TIMES ART WRITER
Dr. Robert and Helen Kuhn's Los Angeles-based collection of African art will be offered for sale Nov. 20 at Sotheby's New York. The auction house has estimated the value of the 140 objects to be sold at $2.8 million to $3.9 million. The highlight of the sale is a 12th-Century terra cotta sculpture from Mali depicting a mythic animal, thought to be a ram. The graceful, 31-inch-tall figure--one of fewer than a dozen of its type--is valued at $250,000 to $350,000.
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February 2, 1994 | RICK VANDERKNYFF, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
As a doctoral student in anthropology, Christopher Steiner surveyed studies of African art. He found a lot of attention paid to its original use in African society but not a word on how the works make their way to the art markets of Europe and America. He said he believes that is at least partly because African art dealers and collectors would rather not acknowledge the economic side of their pursuit: the way in which ritual objects are transformed into commodities.
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July 25, 1995 | ZAN DUBIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When New York's Museum for African Art moved downtown in 1993, officials came up with an exhibit to appeal to their new neighbors, Soho's celebrated enclave of contemporary artists. "Western Artists/African Art," which went on the road--it currently is at the Newport Harbor Art Museum--showcases African artifacts (sculpture, masks, textiles, musical instruments and furniture) collected by two dozen well-known American contemporary artists.
NEWS
September 26, 1988 | SCOTT KRAFT, Times Staff Writer
The revolutionary artist squinted into the reflecting white sand to study the talent of the next generation. His thick, tangled beard stirred, and he smiled. Malangatana liked what he saw. The sand-scape was covered with helicopters and parachutes, landing planes and speeding motorbikes, blooming flowers and happy children--the stuff of a child's world in a teeming African barrio at the end of an airport runway. Paper, pencils and paintbrushes are rare commodities in war-torn Mozambique.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 15, 2013 | By Jori Finkel, Los Angeles Times
The L.A. County Museum of Art has signaled its commitment to African art by paying $1 million for a 3-foot-high "Gwan" sculpture of a mother and infant, believed to help ensure healthy childbirth by the Bamana peoples of Mali. "It's one of the oldest surviving wood sculptures of Africa and probably the oldest Gwan figure in existence," said Polly Nooter Roberts, a curator of African art at LACMA and professor at UCLA. According to carbon dating, the piece was made between 1432 and 1644, earlier than Gwan figures at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 6, 2013 | By Susan King, Los Angeles Times
Ayuko Babu, a co-founder and executive director of the 21st Pan African Film & Arts Festival, believes it is a good time for black filmmakers around the world. "Everywhere there is a resurgence of black films," Babu said. "With technology the way it is now, wherever there is a black community there are people making films. They want to tell their stories. As a result of the slave trade and colonization, Africans are split all over the world, so therefore a little bit of their story is everywhere.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 27, 2011 | By Jori Finkel, Los Angeles Times
The way Columbia University professor Kellie Jones describes it, artists Maren Hassinger and Senga Nengudi were well ahead of their time. They were black artists based in L.A. in the 1970s who were not making especially political art. They were women artists not making explicitly feminist art. And along with making individual sculptures, they also worked together and with a larger group of artists in L.A. on performances that combined sculpture, dance,...
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February 10, 2009
Museum chief: Johnnetta Cole, a former college president and anthropology professor, has been named director of the Smithsonian's National Museum of African Art.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 30, 2008 | Gale Holland
After almost 20 years in the film business, Jill Gurr started a script-writing workshop for youths in detention on a variety of criminal convictions. To her astonishment, several illiterate young men in the class learned to read and write. When they saw their own words incorporated into a script, they were eager to read it, she said during a break in an art workshop for foster girls at a recent Christmas crafts fair in downtown Los Angeles.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 8, 2008 | Joe Holley, Holley is a writer for the Washington Post, where this report first appeared.
Warren M. Robbins, founder of the Museum of African Art, forerunner to the Smithsonian's National Museum of African Art, died Dec. 4 at George Washington University Hospital of complications from a fall at his home last month. He was 85. When he started the Museum of African Art in 1964, Robbins had never been to Africa, never worked in a museum, never been involved with the arts and never raised money.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 29, 2008 | Anne-Marie O'Connor, Times Staff Writer
When museums display African art and Modern art together, they generally do so to illustrate how seeing Africa's arresting masks and fantastic figures helped Picasso and other Modern artists escape the constraints of Realism and move into Cubism, Surrealism and Dadaism. But in a new gallery at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, African art is framed as a contemporary art form in its own right, not just an aesthetic enabler for a century of Modern artists.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 17, 1987 | SUZANNE MUCHNIC, Times Art Writer
If you were part of the vocal minority that objected to the imposition of Western values on tribal art in " 'Primitivism' and 20th-Century Art," at New York's Museum of Modern Art three years ago, you're in for another struggle with "Perspectives: Angles on African Art," at the San Diego Museum of Art. Though they're not in the same league, the two shows invite similar criticism.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 29, 2008 | Anne-Marie O'Connor, Times Staff Writer
When museums display African art and Modern art together, they generally do so to illustrate how seeing Africa's arresting masks and fantastic figures helped Picasso and other Modern artists escape the constraints of Realism and move into Cubism, Surrealism and Dadaism. But in a new gallery at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, African art is framed as a contemporary art form in its own right, not just an aesthetic enabler for a century of Modern artists.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 24, 2007 | Suzanne Muchnic, Times Staff Writer
Jan Baum is closing her La Brea Avenue gallery on the last day of 2007. Thirty years after staging the first of hundreds of exhibitions for artists such as Betye Saar, Peter Plagens, Chris Burden and Roberto Gil de Montes, it's time for Baum, who's now in her 70s, to travel and pursue her art passions at a more leisurely pace.
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