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WORLD
March 25, 2013 | By Robyn Dixon
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa -- The African Union on Monday suspended the Central African Republic and imposed sanctions after rebels ousted President Francois Bozize. South African President Jacob Zuma condemned the rebels as “bandits.” Zuma confirmed that at least 13 South African soldiers died in a nine-hour battle after they were attacked by some 2,000 rebels, and an additional 27 South Africans were wounded. One South African soldier is missing. "It is a sad moment for our country,” Zuma said, as controversy raged over the government's failure to pull out its forces.
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WORLD
April 10, 2014 | By Alexandra Zavis
The United Nations Security Council on Thursday unanimously authorized a nearly 12,000-member peacekeeping force for the Central African Republic, where fighting between Christians and Muslims has been raging for months. The U.N. force will take over Sept. 15 from nearly 6,000 African Union troops already deployed in the country, many of whom are expected to be incorporated into the new operation. A separate 2,000-member force sent by former colonial ruler France is authorized to support the U.N. mission.
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WORLD
January 31, 2009 | Associated Press
The African Union urged the International Criminal Court on Friday to suspend its indictment of Sudan's president on genocide charges, saying it could jeopardize any peace process in Darfur. The court's chief prosecutor has accused President Omar Hassan Ahmed Bashir of committing genocide and crimes against humanity in a campaign against tribes in Darfur involving killings, rape and deportation.
WORLD
April 3, 2014 | By Carol J. Williams
Chad's Foreign Ministry said Thursday that it would withdraw its 850 peacekeeping troops from the African Union mission in the neighboring Central African Republic. The move follows criticism from human rights organizations and Christian militants after Chadian troops were involved in shootings that killed 32 people last weekend in Bangui, capital of the Central African Republic. "Despite the sacrifices we have made, Chad and Chadians have been targeted in a gratuitous and malicious campaign that blamed them for all the suffering in CAR," the Foreign Ministry said in a statement.
WORLD
October 11, 2013 | By Robyn Dixon
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa -- A top African Union official said the International Criminal Court was a "political instrument" with a condescending approach to Africa, as African leaders gathered in the Ethiopian capital, Addis Ababa, to discuss the court. The extraordinary meeting to talk about the court's relationship with Africa comes with Kenya's president and vice president facing trial for crimes against humanity at the ICC in the Hague. Some East African officials are reportedly pressing for a mass withdrawal from the ICC. Ethiopia, Kenya, Sudan and Uganda have been deeply critical of the ICC, accusing it of bias.
WORLD
December 30, 2008 | times wire reports
The African Union suspended Guinea from the bloc and threatened further sanctions unless young soldiers who seized power last week restore constitutional rule. That seemed unlikely in the immediate future, however, as many in Guinea appeared to welcome the bloodless coup that followed the Dec. 22 death of longtime dictator Lansana Conte.
WORLD
December 9, 2013 | By David S. Cloud
WASHINGTON - The U.S. military will fly about 850 African Union troops to the Central African Republic this week to assist French soldiers trying to quell street battles by rival militias in the country's capital, the Pentagon announced Monday. Two U.S. Air Force C-17 cargo planes will ferry the troops and their equipment from Bujumbura, capital of Burundi, to Bangui, capital of the Central African Republic, a landlocked former French colony. The airlift operation is scheduled to begin by Tuesday and last until the end of the week.
WORLD
August 10, 2008 | From Times Wire Reports
The African Union will suspend Mauritania until democracy is restored in the West African nation where soldiers overthrew the president this week, AU chair Tanzania said. Tanzanian Foreign Affairs Minister Bernard Membe said Mauritania had signed several AU conventions banning illegal changes of government, including one last month. Soldiers led by the presidential guard overthrew Sidi Ould Cheikh Abdallahi, the country's first democratically elected president, on Wednesday after he tried to sack senior officers.
WORLD
October 21, 2011 | By Robyn Dixon, Los Angeles Times
The African Union on Friday dismissed claims by Somali insurgents that they had killed dozens of alliance soldiers in Mogadishu, contending that Shabab had dressed the corpses of its own dead in AU uniforms as a propaganda stunt. The Islamist militia, which is linked to Al Qaeda, displayed dozens of bodies — along with Bibles and wooden crosses that purportedly belonged to the dead — on the outskirts of the war-torn Somali capital Thursday, claiming to have killed about 70 peacekeepers.
WORLD
September 18, 2009 | Edmund Sanders
In swift retaliation for the U.S. killing this week of a suspected Al Qaeda fugitive in Somalia, insurgents attacked the main African Union peacekeeping base in Mogadishu with twin truck bombs Thursday, killing at least nine people, including four AU soldiers. Suicide bombers attempted to infiltrate the heavily guarded seaside base by impersonating U.N. personnel, AU officials said. Among the wounded were unidentified senior Somali government officials, who were visiting the base, and the newly arrived African Union force commander, Ugandan Maj. Gen. Nathan Mugisha, who suffered minor injuries, AU and government officials said.
WORLD
March 7, 2014 | By David S. Cloud
WASHINGTON - Amid a surge of Islamic militancy in North Africa, a team of fewer than 50 U.S. special operations troops with a single helicopter arrived at a remote base in western Tunisia last month. Their mission: train Tunisian troops in counter-terrorism tactics. The operation was one of dozens of U.S. military deployments in Africa over the last year, often to tiny and temporary outposts. The goal is to leverage American military expertise against an arc of growing instability in North Africa and many sub-Saharan countries, from Mali in the west to Somalia in the east.
OPINION
February 16, 2014 | By Michael O'Hanlon
For decades, one golden rule has guided America's military involvement in Africa: Stay out. Generally speaking, the reason was a sense that the strategic stakes did not justify the risk. When we deviated from this rule, we often learned lessons the hard way that seemed to reinforce its validity, as in Somalia in 1993. And while presidents often profess a stronger interest in Africa than their actions would imply, they tend to say such things when not in the White House - witness Bill Clinton calling the nonintervention in Rwanda's 1994 genocide his greatest regret as president, or Sen. Barack Obama calling for more assertiveness in the Democratic Republic of Congo, or DRC, and Sudan six to eight years ago. But, in fact, now is the time to reassess this long-standing American anathema to military involvement in Africa's terrible wars.
WORLD
January 16, 2014 | By Robyn Dixon
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa -- Both sides in South Sudan's new war have committed "appalling crimes," according to a Human Rights Watch report Thursday, offering a grim picture of massacres, ethnic killings and looting of humanitarian aid. The organization said a credible independent investigation was required, calling on the African Union to broaden its planned inquiry into atrocities to make it "truly independent and credible. " It also called for United Nations sanctions against individuals found to be responsible for crimes.
WORLD
January 10, 2014 | By Erin Conway-Smith
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa - The Central African Republic's interim president, Michel Djotodia, agreed to resign Friday under regional pressure after failing to halt the brutal sectarian violence that has devastated the country, officials announced. Djotodia, the Muslim Seleka rebel alliance leader who seized power last March in a coup, and interim prime minister, Nicolas Tiengaye, were stepping down, officials said at a special security summit in Chad convened by the Economic Community of Central African States.
WORLD
December 9, 2013 | By David S. Cloud
WASHINGTON - The U.S. military will fly about 850 African Union troops to the Central African Republic this week to assist French soldiers trying to quell street battles by rival militias in the country's capital, the Pentagon announced Monday. Two U.S. Air Force C-17 cargo planes will ferry the troops and their equipment from Bujumbura, capital of Burundi, to Bangui, capital of the Central African Republic, a landlocked former French colony. The airlift operation is scheduled to begin by Tuesday and last until the end of the week.
WORLD
December 9, 2013 | By Robyn Dixon
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa - Thousands of South Africans filed into the 94,000-seat soccer stadium in Soweto early Tuesday for the state memorial service of the nation's apartheid-struggle hero, Nelson Mandela. Low gray clouds and misty rain cast a somber mood, but the atmosphere in the stadium was joyful and exuberant, as the crowds sang liberation struggle songs, danced, ululated, whistled and blasted vuvuzelas - the plastic trumpets that South Africans blow at soccer matches and joyful occasions, waiting for the service to begin.
WORLD
August 5, 2005 | From Times Wire Reports
The African Union suspended Mauritania after army officers seized power in an apparently bloodless coup. The 53-nation African Union firmly denounced the coup and demanded the "restoration of constitutional order." The United Nations, former colonial power France and the United States have all condemned Wednesday's takeover. The U.S. has been training Mauritania's troops to fight Islamic militants thought to be operating in the Sahara desert.
WORLD
July 3, 2006 | From Times Wire Reports
African leaders agreed to extend their military mission in Darfur after U.N. Secretary-General Kofi Annan failed to persuade Sudan to allow in international peacekeepers. But Annan said he expected a United Nations peacekeeping force to be deployed eventually. Annan met Sudanese leader Omar Hassan Ahmed Bashir on the fringes of an African Union summit in Gambia.
OPINION
October 15, 2013
Re "Africans dispute tribunals," Oct. 13 It is hardly a surprise that Kenyan President Uhuru Kenyatta and Sudanese President Omar Hassan Ahmed Bashir are calling on the African Union to withdraw its support of the International Criminal Court. Both have been charged by the ICC with crimes against humanity. It is not a surprise that these criminally indicted "leaders" wish to sustain the culture of impunity that is running rampant in too many countries in Africa. The African Union is to be commended for its refusal, so far, to support this sinister proposal for its member countries to withdraw en masse from the ICC. Kenyatta and Bashir claim that it is disrespectful to indict and try government leaders in the ICC. Respect is earned, not conferred.
WORLD
October 12, 2013 | By Robyn Dixon, This post has been corrected. See the note below for details.
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa - African Union leaders Saturday said that no sitting African leader should face trial by the International Criminal Court for heinous crimes. But African opponents failed to win support for a mass withdrawal from the ICC at an AU summit in Addis Ababa, the Ethiopian capital, on Africa's relationship with the court, according to news agencies. After the summit, AU officials suggested that Kenyan President Uhuru Kenyatta would withdraw his cooperation with the court based in The Hague in his upcoming trial for crimes against humanity.
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