Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsAfrikaner Resistance Movement
IN THE NEWS

Afrikaner Resistance Movement

FEATURED ARTICLES
WORLD
April 3, 2010 | By Robyn Dixon
South African white supremacist Eugene TerreBlanche was hacked and bludgeoned to death Saturday after an argument with two workers on his farm outside Ventersdorp in North West Province, according to local police. TerreBlanche, 69, was the leader of the Afrikaner Resistance Movement, formed in the 1970s, which bitterly opposed black-majority rule. His death comes amid increased racial tension in South Africa. Last month, the head of the ruling African National Congress' Youth League, Julius Malema, was banned by a court from singing "Shoot the Boer," a song from the anti-apartheid struggle referring to white farmers.
ARTICLES BY DATE
WORLD
May 23, 2012 | By Robyn Dixon, Los Angeles Times
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa — A 29-year-old farmworker was convicted Tuesday of the murder of South African white supremacist leader Eugene TerreBlanche, but his teenage companion was acquitted in the killing, which had sparked fears of racial violence. Chris Mahlangu was found guilty of killing TerreBlanche, his employer and longtime advocate of a separate state for white Afrikaners. Patrick Ndlovu, 18, who was 15 and present at the slaying, was found guilty of housebreaking with intent to steal.
Advertisement
NEWS
March 8, 1988 | From Reuters
Seven reserve police officers have been dismissed because they are members of the extreme right-wing Afrikaner Resistance Movement, a South African police spokesman said Monday.
WORLD
April 3, 2010 | By Robyn Dixon
South African white supremacist Eugene TerreBlanche was hacked and bludgeoned to death Saturday after an argument with two workers on his farm outside Ventersdorp in North West Province, according to local police. TerreBlanche, 69, was the leader of the Afrikaner Resistance Movement, formed in the 1970s, which bitterly opposed black-majority rule. His death comes amid increased racial tension in South Africa. Last month, the head of the ruling African National Congress' Youth League, Julius Malema, was banned by a court from singing "Shoot the Boer," a song from the anti-apartheid struggle referring to white farmers.
NEWS
January 20, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
South African police have arrested 10 white men for the bombing of government buildings and integrated schools. Law and Order Minister Hernus Kriel said all the suspects belong to the Afrikaner AWB (Afrikaner Resistance Movement) and the militant white supremacist Afrikaner Commando.
NEWS
February 7, 1989
The South Africa government cracked down for the first time on the country's most powerful white extremist group, banning displays of firearms at meetings of the Afrikaner Resistance Movement. Law and Order Minister Adriaan Vlok imposed the ban on the neo-Nazi group under the same emergency regulations used to restrict many anti-apartheid movements. Vlok said that meetings of the resistance movement have been "characterized by emotion-laden speeches . . .
NEWS
January 29, 1992 | From Associated Press
Police arrested 10 white extremist leaders Tuesday in raids certain to enrage rightists, who are already threatening violence against government power-sharing with blacks. Among those arrested on charges of public violence was Eugene TerreBlanche, head of the Afrikaner Resistance Movement, who is considered South Africa's most militant right-wing leader. He and nine associates in the neo-Nazi group were released on bail of up to $36, and a court date was set for March 9.
NEWS
July 15, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
A suspected hand-grenade attack killed a black man in Johannesburg on Saturday and injured 10 people just hours after a black hotel waiter died in a bomb blast. Altogether, three explosions rocked the city, ending a weeklong lull in urban terrorism blamed on white extremists opposed to racial reform. The first explosion ripped through an alleyway outside a hotel in the western suburb of Florida shortly after midnight Friday, killing the black waiter.
NEWS
May 30, 1993 | From Associated Press
Hundreds of armed neo-Nazis--some accompanied by their children--marched through the South African capital Saturday to protest the end of apartheid and demand a separate state for whites. The marchers, many armed with guns and knives, paraded with swastika-like flags to the beat of drums as horsemen cantered alongside. "Kill the blacks," some marchers shouted.
WORLD
May 23, 2012 | By Robyn Dixon, Los Angeles Times
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa — A 29-year-old farmworker was convicted Tuesday of the murder of South African white supremacist leader Eugene TerreBlanche, but his teenage companion was acquitted in the killing, which had sparked fears of racial violence. Chris Mahlangu was found guilty of killing TerreBlanche, his employer and longtime advocate of a separate state for white Afrikaners. Patrick Ndlovu, 18, who was 15 and present at the slaying, was found guilty of housebreaking with intent to steal.
NEWS
March 12, 1994 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The three white men in ripped khaki uniforms and boots lay sprawled Friday beside their bullet-riddled blue Mercedes-Benz. One man was dead, his head in a pool of gore, while the other two bled slowly into the red earth as they talked. They were from Naboomspruit, a farming town farther north, said Fanie Uys, his face contorted in pain and sweating in the brutal midday sun.
NEWS
May 30, 1993 | From Associated Press
Hundreds of armed neo-Nazis--some accompanied by their children--marched through the South African capital Saturday to protest the end of apartheid and demand a separate state for whites. The marchers, many armed with guns and knives, paraded with swastika-like flags to the beat of drums as horsemen cantered alongside. "Kill the blacks," some marchers shouted.
NEWS
April 11, 1993 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a severe blow to the peace process in South Africa, Chris Hani, a key African National Congress negotiator and hugely popular black leader, was shot dead Saturday in the driveway of his home by a white assassin. Hani, 50, a member of the ANC's top policy-making body and general secretary of the ANC-aligned Communist Party, was attacked when he returned to his rose-brick home in this quiet, multiracial suburb of Johannesburg after a morning errand to buy two newspapers.
NEWS
March 21, 1992 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Shortly after voting against reform here this week, Marc Dewit paused to enlighten an American reporter on Adolf Hitler ("one of the world's great heroes"), communism ("a Jewish conspiracy") and apartheid ("it's not a sin, it's God's law").
NEWS
January 29, 1992 | From Associated Press
Police arrested 10 white extremist leaders Tuesday in raids certain to enrage rightists, who are already threatening violence against government power-sharing with blacks. Among those arrested on charges of public violence was Eugene TerreBlanche, head of the Afrikaner Resistance Movement, who is considered South Africa's most militant right-wing leader. He and nine associates in the neo-Nazi group were released on bail of up to $36, and a court date was set for March 9.
NEWS
January 20, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
South African police have arrested 10 white men for the bombing of government buildings and integrated schools. Law and Order Minister Hernus Kriel said all the suspects belong to the Afrikaner AWB (Afrikaner Resistance Movement) and the militant white supremacist Afrikaner Commando.
NEWS
July 15, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
A suspected hand-grenade attack killed a black man in Johannesburg on Saturday and injured 10 people just hours after a black hotel waiter died in a bomb blast. Altogether, three explosions rocked the city, ending a weeklong lull in urban terrorism blamed on white extremists opposed to racial reform. The first explosion ripped through an alleyway outside a hotel in the western suburb of Florida shortly after midnight Friday, killing the black waiter.
NEWS
June 23, 1990 | MICHAEL A. HILTZIK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Police are investigating a plot by a right-wing white supremacist group to assassinate Nelson Mandela and several members of parliament and to undertake a nationwide program of sabotage and terrorism, officials said Friday. Mandela was to be assassinated at the Johannesburg airport on July 18 when he returned from his international tour, according to an informant who said he had infiltrated the group of plotters after being approached to participate.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|