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Aftershocks

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NEWS
April 11, 2010 | By Carla Rivera
Residents living on the U.S.-Mexico border were shaken Sunday by a magnitude 4.6 earthquake, part of a cluster of moderate aftershocks stemming from the magnitude 7.2 quake that jolted Baja California a week ago, authorities said. Sunday's quake struck at 9:42 a.m. and was centered about 29 miles south southeast of Mexicali, the U.S. Geological Survey said. No damage or injuries have been reported. In a 19-hour period from about 5 p.m. Saturday through noon Sunday, automated seismographs registered at least 17 quakes of magnitude 3 or above with epicenters near Calexico or Mexicali, said Don Blakeman, a geophysicist at the USGS's National Earthquake Information Center in Golden, Colo.
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NEWS
April 1, 2014 | By Ken Schwencke, This post has been updated, as indicated below.
A shallow magnitude 3.0 earthquake was reported Tuesday morning 0 miles from La Habra, according to the U.S. Geological Survey. The temblor occurred at 11:30 a.m. Pacific time at a depth of 0.6 miles. [Updated 11:49 p.m. PDT April 1: According to the U.S. Geological Survey, the quake was felt over a wide area, including much of Northern Orange County, the San Gabriel Valley and Eastside of L.A. There were no reports of damage. ] There have been hundreds of aftershocks from Friday's 5.1 La Habra quake, largest being a 4.1 magnitude temblor that hit Rowland Heights Saturday afternoon.
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WORLD
May 7, 2010 | By Ken Ellingwood, Los Angeles Times
In a sweltering annex behind the General Hospital, inner demons stalk in plain view. In one cramped room, a 58-year-old woman rocks rhythmically on a folding chair and recites Psalms one after another, her mouth curled up in a faraway smile. In another, a young man describes how his heart takes off without warning, thumping like a runaway train the way it did that terrible afternoon. Not all the hurts from Haiti's earthquake can be seen. The Jan. 12 temblor, which the government estimates killed 300,000 people, also exacted a toll on the psyche of survivors.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 31, 2014 | By a Times staff writer
There have been hundreds of aftershocks from Friday's 5.1 earthquake in La Habra, which experts said is what they expected. The aftershocks are declining in frequency. The largest was a 4.1 temblor that hit Rowland Heights on Saturday afternoon. Many of the smaller ones likely were not felt. Caltech seismologist Egill Hauksson said Saturday that scientists can't predict where earthquakes will go. “We just have to watch what happens,” Hauksson said. PHOTOS: 5.1 quake rattles L.A., Orange County There is precedent for earthquake aftershocks jumping faults.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 10, 2014 | By Shelby Grad and Richie Duchon
A magnitude 6.9 earthquake off the coast of Northern California on Sunday night was the largest on the West Coast since the 7.2 Baja California quake in 2010. Sunday's temblor was followed by a series of at least 13 aftershocks as large as a magnitude 4.6, according to the U.S. Geological Survey. The big quake occurred at 10:18 p.m. in the Pacific Ocean 50 miles west of Eureka in Humboldt County. The USGS put the depth of the quake at about four miles. Several of the aftershocks were much closer to land, including one about 16 miles off the coast that registered as a magnitude 3.4. FULL COVERAGE: California earthquake safety Eureka Police Department Sgt. Brian Stephens said there had been no reports of significant damage or injuries from the initial quake.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 23, 2013 | By Robert J. Lopez
More than a dozen aftershocks were reported Thursday night following a 5.7 earthquake about 150 miles northeast of Sacramento, officials said. The initial quake hit about 8:47 p.m.; its epicenter was about 27 miles southwest of Susanville and seven miles west northwest of Greenville, according to the U.S. Geological Survey. People on Twitter told The Times they felt that quake in Sacramento and Lodi, as well as South Reno and on the northwest shore of Lake Tahoe. Police officials in Susanville and Sacramento said that the quake set off a number of home and car alarms and rattled windows but that there were no immediate reports of damage.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 24, 2013 | By Rosanna Xia
The largest earthquake to shake California since 2008 occurred in a less studied area of the state, prompting seismologists to head to the Northern California region with more monitoring equipment, officials said Friday. Thursday's magnitude 5.7 quake struck about 8:47 p.m. about 150 miles northeast of Sacramento; its epicenter was about 27 miles southwest of the town of Susanville and seven miles west-northwest of Greenville. The mountainous eastern Sierra Nevada region, known for its lakes, rivers and national forests, has had about seven magnitude 4 earthquakes since the 1930s, said David Schwartz, an earthquake geologist for the Northern California USGS division in Menlo Park.
SCIENCE
March 16, 2011 | By Eryn Brown, Los Angeles Times
As dozens of aftershocks continued to rattle Japan on Tuesday, scientists said they were worried that Friday's magnitude 9 earthquake might trigger a dangerous temblor close to Tokyo, the largest urban center in the world. The fear is that the initial quake and the series of large aftershocks will transfer geophysical stress into nearby faults, causing some near Tokyo to shift violently, said Michael Wysession, a seismologist at Washington University in St. Louis. Photos: Scenes of earthquake destruction Already, the pattern of aftershocks in Japan appears to be shifting southward toward Tokyo from off the coast of Sendai, 231 miles away.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 11, 2014 | By Ari Bloomekatz
Dozens of aftershocks have occurred since Sunday's magnitude-6.9 earthquake that rattled Northern California, the state's largest temblor in nearly a decade. The largest of the aftershocks, near Ferndale in Humboldt County, measured a magnitude 4.5, and officials expected them to continue for several days. Overall, the aftershocks have been getting smaller and less frequent. Sunday's quake caused no damage or injuries because it was centered 50 miles off the coast of Eureka and occurred at a depth of "10 miles beneath the Pacific seabed," according to the U.S. Geological Survey . By the time the seismic energy reached the shore, it had dissipated significantly.
WORLD
March 12, 2011 | By Molly Hennessy-Fiske, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
The death toll from Japan's 8.9-magnitude earthquake and the tsunami that followed will likely increase Saturday, as rescue efforts continue to be hampered by aftershocks and damaged infrastructure, according to a United Nations Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs situation report. Japanese authorities had mobilized thousands of troops for the rescue effort Saturday, according to the report, with more than 300 planes and 40 ships conducting air and boat rescues. However, the report noted that "continued aftershocks and tsunami are hampering rescue efforts.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 29, 2014 | By Rong-Gong Lin II
Saturday's magnitude 4.1 aftershock near Rowland Heights suggests the cluster of earthquakes triggered by the 5.1 temblor Friday is moving northeast. The 2:32 p.m. earthquake occurred about three miles northeast of Friday night's large earthquake. Other aftershocks hit within 2.5 miles of the epicenter of the La Habra quake. “There could be additional earthquakes to the northeast,” said Caltech seismologist Egill Hauksson. But he noted scientists can't predict where earthquakes will go. “We just have to watch what happens,” Hauksson said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 29, 2014 | By Rong-Gong Lin II and Victoria Kim
More than 100 aftershocks have been reported since a magnitude 5.1 earthquake rattled Southern California on Friday night. Most of the aftershocks have been small, but some were strong enough to be felt in the areas around the epicenter in northwestern Orange County. Meanwhile, officials surveyed the damage, which for the most part was considered minor. Fullerton police said early Saturday that as many as 50 people had been displaced by the quake. Several buildings are being investigated for possible structural damage, including some apartment buildings.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 29, 2014 | By Christine Mai-Duc
A large aftershock Saturday afternoon caused minor damage but unnerved some Fullerton residents already jittery from the previous night's 5.1 temblor. The 4.1-magnitude quake occurred at 2:32 p.m. in Rowland Heights, about five miles from Friday's epicenter. Twitter users as far as East Los Angeles reported feeling it. The shaking, which residents described as a rolling rumble, caused at least two water main breaks in Fullerton, leaving some residents without water while city crews scrambled to the scene, said Fullerton Police Lieut.
NEWS
March 28, 2014 | By Ken Schwencke and Rong-Gong Lin II
A magnitude 5.1 earthquake was reported Friday evening one mile from La Habra, California, according to the U.S. Geological Survey. The temblor occurred at 9:09 p.m. Pacific time at a depth of 0.6 miles. 11:50 p.m. USGS scientist Lucy Jones' advice for Friday night: “Don't put your child to bed under a tall bookcase that could fall over him tonight. " Updated at 11:30 p.m. Fullerton police say the corner of Rosecrans and Gilbert avenues is closed because of a water main break.
NEWS
March 17, 2014 | By Ken Schwencke
A shallow magnitude 2.7 earthquake aftershock was reported Monday morning four miles from Westwood, according to the U.S. Geological Survey. The temblor occurred at 7:23 a.m. Pacific time at a depth of 4.3 miles. A magnitude 4.4 earthquake was reported at 6.25 a.m. and was felt over a large swath of Southern California. According to the USGS, the epicenter of the aftershock was five miles from Beverly Hills, six miles from Santa Monica and six miles from West Hollywood. FULL COVERAGE: Southern California earthquakes In the last 10 days, there has been one earthquake of magnitude 3.0 or greater centered nearby.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 11, 2014 | By Ari Bloomekatz
Dozens of aftershocks have occurred since Sunday's magnitude-6.9 earthquake that rattled Northern California, the state's largest temblor in nearly a decade. The largest of the aftershocks, near Ferndale in Humboldt County, measured a magnitude 4.5, and officials expected them to continue for several days. Overall, the aftershocks have been getting smaller and less frequent. Sunday's quake caused no damage or injuries because it was centered 50 miles off the coast of Eureka and occurred at a depth of "10 miles beneath the Pacific seabed," according to the U.S. Geological Survey . By the time the seismic energy reached the shore, it had dissipated significantly.
WORLD
March 13, 2011 | By Barbara Demick and Molly Hennessy-Fiske, Los Angeles Times
Aftershocks continued to jolt Japan as rescue efforts increased Sunday morning following Friday's 8.9 magnitude earthquake. The island nation had experienced more than 275 aftershocks of magnitude 5 or greater as of Sunday morning, according to the United States Geological Survey. Of those aftershocks, 27 have been magnitude 6 or greater, USGS records show. "And that could change. We have more every hour," said Dale Grant, a geophysicist at the USGS National Earthquake Information Center in Golden, Colo.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 10, 2014 | By Shelby Grad and Richie Duchon
A magnitude 6.9 earthquake off the coast of Northern California on Sunday night was the largest on the West Coast since the 7.2 Baja California quake in 2010. Sunday's temblor was followed by a series of at least 13 aftershocks as large as a magnitude 4.6, according to the U.S. Geological Survey. The big quake occurred at 10:18 p.m. in the Pacific Ocean 50 miles west of Eureka in Humboldt County. The USGS put the depth of the quake at about four miles. Several of the aftershocks were much closer to land, including one about 16 miles off the coast that registered as a magnitude 3.4. FULL COVERAGE: California earthquake safety Eureka Police Department Sgt. Brian Stephens said there had been no reports of significant damage or injuries from the initial quake.
OPINION
January 17, 2014 | By The Times editorial board
Twenty years ago today, much of Los Angeles was shaken awake at 4:31 a.m. by a magnitude 6.7 earthquake on a blind thrust fault that scientists didn't know existed. The Northridge quake (which was actually centered under Reseda) left 57 people dead, turned the 10 Freeway into a concrete version of a broken Kit Kat bar, caused $20 billion in property damage and made the Santa Susana Mountains on the northern edge of the San Fernando Valley two feet taller. Since then, we have gotten smarter about earthquakes and buildings.
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