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Aftershocks

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 24, 2013 | By Rosanna Xia
The largest earthquake to shake California since 2008 occurred in a less studied area of the state, prompting seismologists to head to the Northern California region with more monitoring equipment, officials said Friday. Thursday's magnitude 5.7 quake struck about 8:47 p.m. about 150 miles northeast of Sacramento; its epicenter was about 27 miles southwest of the town of Susanville and seven miles west-northwest of Greenville. The mountainous eastern Sierra Nevada region, known for its lakes, rivers and national forests, has had about seven magnitude 4 earthquakes since the 1930s, said David Schwartz, an earthquake geologist for the Northern California USGS division in Menlo Park.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 24, 2013 | By Rosanna Xia
The magnitude 5.7 earthquake that struck Northern California on Thursday was the largest on-land temblor in California since 2008, officials said. The last quake similar to this magnitude was a magnitude 5.5 that struck Southern California in July 2008 , said David Schwartz, an earthquake geologist for the Northern California USGS division in Menlo Park. The Chino Hills temblor caused little damage, but it was the most sizable quake to hit a metropolitan part of California since the much larger and destructive 1994 Northridge quake.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 23, 2013 | By Robert J. Lopez
More than a dozen aftershocks were reported Thursday night following a 5.7 earthquake about 150 miles northeast of Sacramento, officials said. The initial quake hit about 8:47 p.m.; its epicenter was about 27 miles southwest of Susanville and seven miles west northwest of Greenville, according to the U.S. Geological Survey. People on Twitter told The Times they felt that quake in Sacramento and Lodi, as well as South Reno and on the northwest shore of Lake Tahoe. Police officials in Susanville and Sacramento said that the quake set off a number of home and car alarms and rattled windows but that there were no immediate reports of damage.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 11, 2013 | By Frank Shyong and Joseph Serna, Los Angeles Times
Monday morning's magnitude 4.7 earthquake in Riverside County was the largest temblor to hit the Los Angeles region in three years and has produced more than 100 aftershocks. It caused no major damage, but it was felt over what seismologists said was an unusually large area. The quake was initially recorded as three separate temblors because a foreshock tricked seismograms into recording multiple quakes of multiple sizes, said Susan Hough, a USGS seismologist. Earthquakes of a 4.7 magnitude are typically felt only about 120 miles away from the epicenter, but Monday morning's quake traveled farther, shaking coffee cups as far as Los Angeles.
BUSINESS
April 21, 2012 | By Dawn C. Chmielewski and Rebecca Keegan, Los Angeles Times
Walt Disney Studios film chief Rich Ross' abrupt departure Friday comes at a difficult time for one of the largest, oldest and most successful of Hollywood's historic entertainment companies. It has also called into question Walt Disney Co. Chairman and Chief Executive Robert A. Iger's ambitious attempt to modernize the 89-year-old studio by placing a TV executive in charge of his film division and accelerates uncertainty at a time when all entertainment companies are struggling to come to terms with a dying DVD business and long-term declines in movie ticket sales.
WORLD
October 23, 2011 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A powerful 7.2-magnitude earthquake struck eastern Turkey on Sunday, killing at least138 people and sparking widespread panic as it collapsed dozens of buildings into piles of twisted steel and chunks of concrete. The death toll was expected to rise. Tens of thousands fled into the streets, screaming or trying to reach relatives on mobile phones as apartment and office buildings cracked or collapsed. As the full extent of the damage became clear, survivors dug in with shovels or even their bare hands, desperately trying to rescue the trapped and the injured.
WORLD
May 31, 2011 | By John M. Glionna, Los Angeles Times
A few days after Japan's magnitude 9 earthquake struck, physician Munetaka Ushio was making his rounds visiting patients when he felt the unnerving sensation of the earth moving beneath his feet. Dizzy and unsettled, he fell into a chair and waited out what he thought was another of the hundreds of aftershocks that have rocked Japan since the disastrous March 11 earthquake and accompanying tsunami. "I felt something was shaking. I didn't know whether it was an aftershock or if my mind was playing tricks on me," said the 38-year-old ear, nose and throat specialist at Tokyo Medical Center.
TRAVEL
April 17, 2011 | By Mary Forgione, Special to the Los Angeles Times
The soggy carpeting has been thrown away, the damaged furniture discarded. The beaches are being rebuilt, and the landscaping redone. Hawaii continues to recover from the effects of the tsunami triggered by the 9.0 earthquake that struck Japan on March 11, which, in turn, prompted President Obama to declare parts of the state federal disaster areas. But the bigger question, some say, is whether the decrease in the number of Japanese visitors will cause a financial seismic shock that may prove more difficult to overcome for a state just beginning to recover from the recession.
WORLD
April 8, 2011 | By Ralph Vartabedian, Los Angeles Times
Although the damaged Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant has not yet been stabilized, there is no evidence that overheating during the last month has resulted in any melting of the reactor vessels or their containment structures, Obama administration officials said Thursday. If that assessment is correct, then significant additional releases of radioactivity into the environment will be limited, and emergency crews should have a far better chance of preventing further damage to the plant's reactors.
WORLD
April 7, 2011 | By John M. Glionna and Julie Makinen, Los Angeles Times
A magnitude 7.1 aftershock struck northeastern Japan late Thursday night, prompting a brief tsunami warning for areas already ravaged by a March 11 earthquake and tsunami, according to the nation's meteorological agency. The Japanese Meteorological Agency warned of tsunami heights of up to 6.6 feet in Miyagi prefecture and slightly less than 2 feet in nearby prefectures. The tsunami warning was lifted after 90 minutes. Japanese media reported that the Onagawa nuclear plant in Miyagi lost two of three external power systems following the aftershock but still had power from one source.
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