Advertisement
 
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsAge Discrimination
IN THE NEWS

Age Discrimination

FEATURED ARTICLES
NATIONAL
June 20, 2008 | David G. Savage, Times Staff Writer
The Supreme Court gave the nation's older workers stronger protections against age bias Thursday, ruling that employers who are sued must prove their layoff policies are reasonable and do not have an unfair effect on employees because of their age. The 7-1 decision puts private companies and public agencies on notice that they must defend the criteria they use for layoffs if the cutbacks disproportionately affect older workers. For example, when employers reduce the workforce, they sometimes rate their workers in deciding who is to be let go. Usually, the ratings focus on specific skills and can include subjective criteria such as "flexibility" or "creativity."
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
August 2, 2013 | By David Ng
The Cleveland Plain Dealer laid off one-third of its newsroom staff on Wednesday, and among those to go was Donald Rosenberg, the newspaper's former senior music critic who was reassigned from his post in 2008 and waged an unsuccessful lawsuit against his employer. Rosenberg most recently covered dance and other arts for the newspaper, writing reported pieces as well as some reviews. He confirmed his departure from the Plain Dealer by phone. His legal clash with the Plain Dealer two years ago stemmed from a number of highly critical articles that he wrote aimed at the Cleveland Orchestra and its music director, Franz Welser-Möst.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 29, 2000
Well, I know I've finally arrived at "old age." I can't find a job in the area where I live because I'm too old. I think it is pretty sad when a person not only wants to work but needs to work and is not hired because she is 40-plus years old. I walk into different offices, look around, see basically what the average age is and I can tell whether I will get an interview or not. The look that comes across the faces of the employees whom I ask for...
OPINION
March 23, 2012 | By Michael Kinsley
A friend of mine had his name in the paper the other day. It was in an article speculating about who might inherit a prestigious post in the literary world when the current grandee retires. The article said that my friend would have led the list 10 years ago. Ouch! The obvious though unstated implication is that now he's too old. He just turned 60. He says he already has his dream job and didn't mind the idea that, because he is 60, some career opportunities have moved beyond his reach.
BUSINESS
January 23, 2010 | By Richard Verrier
A long and winding legal battle that raised uncomfortable questions about Hollywood's treatment of middle-aged and older TV writers was settled Friday, a decade after a class-action lawsuit alleged they were the victims of widespread age discrimination. Under the settlement, 17 major networks and production studios, along with seven talent agencies, agreed to pay $70 million to thousands of writers to resolve 19 claims. A group of 165 writers alleged that the networks, studios and talent agencies unfairly squeezed out writers older than 40 in their efforts to capture younger audiences, denying them employment on dramas and situation comedies.
BUSINESS
October 9, 2004 | From Bloomberg News
Allstate Corp. discriminated against older agents when it fired 6,200 employees in 2000, the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission said in a lawsuit. The insurer denied any wrongdoing. The suit was filed in U.S. District Court in St. Louis. Allstate, based in Northbrook, Ill., eliminated all of its employee-agents in 2000 and offered to rehire them as independent contractors with fewer benefits.
BUSINESS
March 2, 2004 | From Bloomberg News
Dick Clark, the 74-year-old former host of "American Bandstand," was sued by a 76-year-old who claims he was denied employment because of his age. Ralph Andrews, who created and produced the television shows "Celebrity Sweepstakes," "You Don't Say" and "Liars Club," claims he was passed over for positions at Dick Clark Productions in favor of a 30-year-old. Andrews claims Clark told him in a letter that "people our age are considered dinosaurs."
BUSINESS
September 13, 2002 | Associated Press
A group of Goodyear Tire & Rubber Co. employees sued the company, saying its employee evaluation system discriminates against older workers. A Goodyear spokesman said the company does not discriminate, but that it is revising the evaluation system to address workers' concerns. Retiree-advocacy group AARP and lawyers representing eight Goodyear workers filed the lawsuit in Ohio state court.
BUSINESS
July 12, 1998
Q: I have been a department manager with my current company for three years. During that time, my reviews have been excellent, my raises and bonuses very good. I recently turned 50, and my manager decided to reorganize things. Without any prior notice, two-thirds of the people who reported to me were assigned to another manager who had no experience overseeing engineers. I feel that I soon will be eliminated and wonder what it would take to show that I have been a victim of age discrimination.
BUSINESS
June 1, 2001 | From Associated Press
A group of white-collar employees who say they were fired from Visteon Corp. because of their age have filed a multimillion-dollar lawsuit against the auto parts supplier. The lawsuit filed in Wayne County Circuit Court by eight plaintiffs age 51 to 58 alleges that Visteon targeted older workers when it fired 1,300 salaried employees this year.
SPORTS
March 30, 2011 | By Lance Pugmire
A Los Angeles County Superior Court jury Wednesday unanimously rejected NBA great Elgin Baylor's wrongful-termination lawsuit against the Clippers. The jury of seven men and five women voted "no" to all of Baylor's claims that the Clippers, owner Donald T. Sterling and team President Andy Roeser oversaw a hostile workplace. Baylor, now 76, alleged he was harassed and subjected to age discrimination leading to his 2008 departure after 22 years as a Clippers executive. The jury deliberated for less than four hours.
SPORTS
March 28, 2011 | By Lance Pugmire
Elgin Baylor's wrongful termination and age-discrimination civil lawsuit against the Clippers is expected to arrive in the hands of jurors Tuesday in Los Angeles Superior Court. In closing statements Monday, the team's attorney blasted Baylor's claim and urged the panel to deprive him of any financial payoff. Ridiculing Baylor's complaints against team executives who asked him about his birthday and how he was feeling in the years before the NBA great's split with the team as executive vice president, Clippers attorney Robert Platt told jurors, "You'd have to have police at every workplace saying you can't sing, 'Happy Birthday.' " Baylor, 76, parted with the Clippers after 22 seasons in 2008 when the team offered him a $10,000 monthly consultant's package.
SPORTS
March 21, 2011 | By Eric Sondheimer
Elgin Baylor testified Monday in his wrongful-termination lawsuit against the Clippers, saying he felt  "insulted and humiliated" after receiving a letter in August 2008 that the team wanted him to become a consultant and retire after 22 years as an executive in the organization. "I felt sick to my stomach. I felt crushed," Baylor said as a seven-man, five-woman jury heard testimony in Los Angeles Superior Court. Baylor, 76, is suing the team, Clippers owner Donald Sterling and President Andy Roeser for wrongful termination based on age discrimination.
SPORTS
March 9, 2011 | By Lance Pugmire
Elgin Baylor's wrongful-termination lawsuit against the Clippers tipped off Tuesday, with his attorney portraying the team as lacking a sincere commitment to success. Baylor's attorney, Alvin J. Pittman, in his opening statement, told the seven-man, five woman jury in Los Angeles Superior Court that Baylor was "positioned to take responsibility for the [team's] losses" when he was ousted in 2008 after 22 years as a Clippers executive. Pittman told jurors that current team President Andy Roeser once told Baylor, then executive vice president and general manager, that "teams sell one of two things: success or hope, and the Clippers sell hope.
SPORTS
March 4, 2011 | By Lance Pugmire
Elgin Baylor on Friday dropped part of his wrongful-termination lawsuit that alleged the Clippers and owner Donald Sterling committed racial discrimination against him when Baylor was a team executive. Baylor, 76, is pressing ahead with the rest of his wrongful-termination claim that he suffered age discrimination and was unjustly fired. Baylor was the team's executive vice president and general manager for 22 years until August 2008. The defendants ? who also include team President Andy Roeser and the NBA ?
OPINION
September 9, 2010
The heated legal and political battle over Proposition 8 might suggest that marriage equality is the last barrier to full participation in society for gays and lesbians. In fact, blatant discrimination on the basis of sexual orientation remains permissible in workplaces across the nation, an injustice Congress must rectify. Thanks to landmark laws such as Title VII of the Civil Rights Act, the Age Discrimination in Employment Act and the Americans with Disabilities Act, most workers must be judged on their abilities and job performance, not on irrelevant personal characteristics such as race, color, religion, sex, national origin, age or disability.
NEWS
April 2, 1996 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Older workers who lose their jobs to someone younger have a claim of illegal age bias, even if the replacement worker is older than 40, too, the Supreme Court said Monday. The ruling strengthens the federal law against age discrimination at a time when thousands of workers, many of them over 40, are losing their jobs because of corporate downsizings.
BUSINESS
May 27, 2010 | By Maura Dolan, Los Angeles Times
An age discrimination lawsuit that charges Google Inc. with firing a manager deemed too old for the Internet company drew sharp questions from the California Supreme Court on Wednesday in a case sure to affect other age bias claims. A lawyer for the dismissed employee, Brian Reid, told the state high court that company e-mails showed Google preferred younger workers. Reid, who was hired as director of operations and engineering when he was 52 and fired two years later, was told by his supervisor that he was not "a cultural fit" for the company, said his lawyer, Paul J. Killion.
BUSINESS
January 23, 2010 | By Richard Verrier
A long and winding legal battle that raised uncomfortable questions about Hollywood's treatment of middle-aged and older TV writers was settled Friday, a decade after a class-action lawsuit alleged they were the victims of widespread age discrimination. Under the settlement, 17 major networks and production studios, along with seven talent agencies, agreed to pay $70 million to thousands of writers to resolve 19 claims. A group of 165 writers alleged that the networks, studios and talent agencies unfairly squeezed out writers older than 40 in their efforts to capture younger audiences, denying them employment on dramas and situation comedies.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|