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Aged California

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NEWS
June 30, 1999 | ALISSA J. RUBIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Clinton's proposal to cover prescription drugs sounds good but how does it measure up to what the elderly now can buy on the open market? The answer is that for retirees in Southern California who buy prescription drug plans through a supplemental insurance policy, the president's plan would cost less. When fully in place in 2010, it also would offer more insurance coverage for prescription drugs than is available in all but one of today's private plans.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 21, 2013 | By Dalina Castellanos, Los Angeles Times
At age 59, Rita Kowalski decided she wanted to use the computer for more than emailing her kids and looking up salmon recipes. Forty-two years after she dropped out of high school to start a family, Kowalski, now a grandmother of 12, is using it to get her high school equivalency credential. "I perked up because I can look straight at the computer," Kowalski said. "My attention span is shorter with books for some reason, but I can look at the screen for hours and it doesn't seem to bother me. " After decades of pencil-to-paper test sheets, California this year became the latest state to launch the General Educational Development test, known as the GED, in a computer format.
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BUSINESS
October 22, 1991 | DANIEL AKST
Two items in the newspapers last week deserve to be read side by side. First, attorneys for Vertigo, the trendy downtown Los Angeles nightspot that openly discriminates against the attire-impaired, are appealing efforts by the California Department of Alcoholic Beverage Control to force the club to admit nerds. Vertigo makes no bones about sorting the stodgy from the chic. A guy at the door eyeballs supplicants eager for entry and makes the decision based entirely on their clothes.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 30, 2009 | Cathleen Decker
The pictures that dominated the news last week formed two parallel realities. In one, Teddy Kennedy's face was young and unlined, his jaw taut, his bearing vibrant, as he was when he campaigned for his brothers and when he ran for president, with one of his final victories the 1980 Democratic primary in California. In another, the Massachusetts senator was grayed and stooped, if still smiling, as he was when longevity helped him forge a stunning array of accomplishments in the United States Senate.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 18, 1997 | LEE ROMNEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jack Sherrill spent 2 1/2 years nursing his Alzheimer's-afflicted wife to a gentle death in their Leisure World home. Fueled by the love of a six-decade marriage, he bathed her, fed her and cared for her with no help from Medicare. When she died two years ago, the 85-year-old retiree with hearing aids easily could have given himself a rest.
BUSINESS
July 29, 1999 | LIZ PULLIAM
Only about one in five eligible Californians has applied for a homeowner and renter rebate that could save them up to $326, and the application deadline is looming. According to state tax officials, more than 1 million lower-income elderly and disabled people are eligible for the payments through the Homeowner and Renter Assistance Program, but so far fewer than 210,000 have applied. The deadline for applications is Aug. 31, the Franchise Tax Board said.
NEWS
January 9, 2000 | DAN MORAIN and AMY PYLE, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Seizing on an issue dear to the elderly and aging baby boomers, Gov. Gray Davis on Monday will propose a series of get-tough sanctions for bad nursing homes, along with tax breaks and other steps to help people avoid going into long-term care facilities. The Democratic governor is offering the sanctions only three months after vetoing legislation that contained many of the same provisions--a step that incurred the wrath of activists who work on behalf of the elderly.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 5, 1995 | JOCELYN Y. STEWART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Back in 1965, Teresa and Glenn McGill said goodby to their sleepy little Pennsylvania town and headed west. In California, they found good jobs, purchased a comfortable home in West Hills and raised three children. Decades later, when it was time to retire, the couple chose California again. "A lot of people ask us [about moving]," 74-year-old Teresa McGill said. "You think about it, but where're you going to go?" But many older people are choosing to leave California--or not come at all.
NEWS
April 6, 1991 | CLAIRE SPIEGEL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Federal health officials disclosed their proposed revisions to a controversial federal nursing home law Friday, provoking a wave of outrage from consumer groups. The revisions would give inspectors greater latitude in enforcing sections of the law that govern, for example, a nursing home's administration of drugs and the practice of transferring patients out of the facility. Deciding what constitutes an accident hazard and proper room furnishings also would be left up to inspectors.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 4, 1993
A Long Beach woman was named Ms. Senior America of California this week at a pageant in Torrance. Undine Wildman was one of 19 contestants in the pageant, sponsored by FHP Health Care for women 60 and older. The winner will represent California at the national Ms. Senior America Pageant in Nashville this May.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 28, 2009 | HECTOR TOBAR
The Ft. Moore Pioneer Memorial on Hill Street is my favorite neglected corner of the downtown Los Angeles Civic Center. As far as I know, it's the biggest monument to the United States' conquest of California. I go there to feel the history. I stand under the terra-cotta soldiers and read the inscriptions honoring the troops who "helped win the Southwest" and who raised the Stars and Stripes at "the first Independence Day in Los Angeles."
FOOD
April 3, 2002 | CHARLES E. OLKEN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Older wines are notoriously fickle. Some age the way you'd expect, others go off in directions not at all evident when they were young. Over the centuries, Europeans have come to understand a thing or two about how their wines age, but New World vintners are still in the learning process. This is true even with such thoroughly studied grapes as Cabernet Sauvignon. These days we know pretty well how Cabs will age, and we've learned a bit about why some vintages hold up better than others.
NEWS
August 17, 2000 | ALISSA J. RUBIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The number of older Californians without insurance coverage for prescription drugs is increasing significantly, largely as a result of diminishing coverage by HMOs, according to new data. Between 1998 and 1999, the percentage of California seniors with no prescription drug coverage rose from 25% to 34%, leaving about 1.2 million without the benefit, according to a study by the New England Medical Center.
NEWS
January 9, 2000 | DAN MORAIN and AMY PYLE, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Seizing on an issue dear to the elderly and aging baby boomers, Gov. Gray Davis on Monday will propose a series of get-tough sanctions for bad nursing homes, along with tax breaks and other steps to help people avoid going into long-term care facilities. The Democratic governor is offering the sanctions only three months after vetoing legislation that contained many of the same provisions--a step that incurred the wrath of activists who work on behalf of the elderly.
BUSINESS
July 29, 1999 | LIZ PULLIAM
Only about one in five eligible Californians has applied for a homeowner and renter rebate that could save them up to $326, and the application deadline is looming. According to state tax officials, more than 1 million lower-income elderly and disabled people are eligible for the payments through the Homeowner and Renter Assistance Program, but so far fewer than 210,000 have applied. The deadline for applications is Aug. 31, the Franchise Tax Board said.
NEWS
June 30, 1999 | ALISSA J. RUBIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Clinton's proposal to cover prescription drugs sounds good but how does it measure up to what the elderly now can buy on the open market? The answer is that for retirees in Southern California who buy prescription drug plans through a supplemental insurance policy, the president's plan would cost less. When fully in place in 2010, it also would offer more insurance coverage for prescription drugs than is available in all but one of today's private plans.
NEWS
August 17, 2000 | ALISSA J. RUBIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The number of older Californians without insurance coverage for prescription drugs is increasing significantly, largely as a result of diminishing coverage by HMOs, according to new data. Between 1998 and 1999, the percentage of California seniors with no prescription drug coverage rose from 25% to 34%, leaving about 1.2 million without the benefit, according to a study by the New England Medical Center.
FOOD
April 3, 2002 | CHARLES E. OLKEN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Older wines are notoriously fickle. Some age the way you'd expect, others go off in directions not at all evident when they were young. Over the centuries, Europeans have come to understand a thing or two about how their wines age, but New World vintners are still in the learning process. This is true even with such thoroughly studied grapes as Cabernet Sauvignon. These days we know pretty well how Cabs will age, and we've learned a bit about why some vintages hold up better than others.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 18, 1997 | LEE ROMNEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jack Sherrill spent 2 1/2 years nursing his Alzheimer's-afflicted wife to a gentle death in their Leisure World home. Fueled by the love of a six-decade marriage, he bathed her, fed her and cared for her with no help from Medicare. When she died two years ago, the 85-year-old retiree with hearing aids easily could have given himself a rest.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 5, 1995 | JOCELYN Y. STEWART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Back in 1965, Teresa and Glenn McGill said goodby to their sleepy little Pennsylvania town and headed west. In California, they found good jobs, purchased a comfortable home in West Hills and raised three children. Decades later, when it was time to retire, the couple chose California again. "A lot of people ask us [about moving]," 74-year-old Teresa McGill said. "You think about it, but where're you going to go?" But many older people are choosing to leave California--or not come at all.
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