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Aged Employment

NEWS
October 9, 1989 | DAVID LARSEN, Times Staff Writer
It once was said that retirement was twice as much spouse and half as much money. But that appears to be changing. Now, "what we are seeing is a new definition of retirement," says Helen Dennis, a lecturer at the USC Andrus Gerontology Center, a project director of the Conference Board and a nationally recognized authority on retirement and older workers. "Americans are discovering that retirement and work do not need to be mutually exclusive, that the two need not be incompatible," she says.
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BUSINESS
September 19, 1989 | From Associated Press
Sylvia Corvo tired of retirement and went back to work when she was nearly 72. Now 80, she doesn't plan to retire again unless poor health forces her--and she doesn't think that's likely any time soon. She's among a growing number of people returning to work or staying on the job after they turn 65. And Corvo, one of two Travelers Insurance Co. retirees who run a 700-person job bank, says many return for the same reason she did.
BUSINESS
February 2, 1989 | JIM SCHACHTER, Times Staff Writer
Marjorie Cates hadn't planned on starting over as a temporary receptionist at age 58. But when she was laid off by Northrop Corp. from her job as a graphics coordinator, the ebullient, white-haired La Canada woman quickly discovered that Kelly Services, the temporary placement firm, was one of the few ready sources of employment for an older person with a narrow range of skills.
BUSINESS
January 13, 1989 | Associated Press
Employers increasingly need to tap the growing pool of older workers to avoid major labor shortages, but such efforts are stymied because the elderly face many disincentives to work beyond retirement age, say two government studies released Thursday. The need to retain, and in some cases retrain, older workers is particularly acute for highly skilled jobs, the reports said.
NEWS
March 10, 1988
The Equal Employment Opportunity Commission has responded to a subpoena by the Senate Aging Committee for files pertaining to age discrimination complaints. The EEOC furnished 11 boxes of documents and has until March 21 to provide additional information on employment complaints on which the statute of limitations expired without any EEOC action. The Times previously reported that the EEOC mistakenly ignored 900 cases for more than two years, the deadline for filing lawsuits.
BUSINESS
October 6, 1987 | HARRY BERNSTEIN
Dramatic demographic changes, corporate labor cost cutting and an unexpected increase in retirements by older workers are opening millions of jobs to people in the 65-plus age bracket. But declining health and income are still enormous problems for most older workers, and even the news that they have more job openings than ever is a mixed blessing. Often the 65-plusers want part-time or temporary jobs. But as the executive director of the National Assn.
NEWS
September 19, 1987 | ROBERT A. ROSENBLATT, Times Staff Writer
Jack Carlson, the new executive director of the American Assn. of Retired Persons, said Friday that Congress should abolish the rule that reduces Social Security benefits for those who continue working until age 70. The earnings penalty is "dumb" and discourages older workers, said Carlson, who will become the chief operating officer of the 26-million-member organization next month. Elimination of the penalty would expand retirement benefits by $5 billion a year.
NEWS
August 28, 1987 | DAVID LARSEN, Times Staff Writer
Only one concession is made because of the age of John Bogosian, according to Bob Talbot, operations manager of the Ralphs Supermarket at Woodman Avenue and Sherman Way in Van Nuys. "Every wrapper is assigned an hour to get the carts from the parking lot," the operations manager said. "During these hot summer months, we allow John to be exempt from this." Other than that, the 82-year-old Bogosian takes his place at the end of a counter from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m.
NEWS
August 28, 1987 | DAVID LARSEN, Times Staff Writer
One of the more memorable television commercials of the year, titled "The New Kid," chronicles the experiences of an old-timer during his first day on the job at a McDonald's restaurant. He ends the day telling his wife: "I don't know how they ever got along without me." More "Now Hiring" signs are in evidence at some businesses, and more near- and past-retirement-age men and women are responding.
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