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ENTERTAINMENT
April 6, 2014 | By Mark Olsen
It's not so much that Jim Jarmusch has edged toward the mainstream but rather that the mainstream has moved closer to him. Over the years the gravitational pull of his slant, laconic sensibility in films such as "Mystery Train," "Dead Man" and "Broken Flowers" has brought him in contact with a classic gallery of performers including Tom Waits, Joe Strummer, Gena Rowlands, Johnny Depp, Bill Murray and many more. Though he first emerged from the outcast environs of the late '70s/early '80s post-punk scene of New York, he has recently received retrospectives from the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences in Los Angeles and the Film Society of Lincoln Center . At 61 he is no longer a punk outsider but part of the pantheon.
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SPORTS
April 3, 2014 | By Bill Shaikin
As the Angels prepared for the 2002 World Series, bench coach Joe Maddon looked at the spray charts and came to a radical conclusion: If the Angels wanted to align their defense based on where Barry Bonds most commonly hit the ball, they should play three infielders and four outfielders. The Angels ultimately decided not to play Bonds that way, although Manager Mike Scioscia said they were "a couple pitches away" from deploying the scheme in certain scenarios. In 2005, Maddon left to manage the Tampa Bay Rays, who have been at the forefront of baseball's shift toward unconventional fielding alignments.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 3, 2014 | By Jasmine Elist
When Annabelle Gurwitch turned 50, she struggled to navigate her way through a stagnant marriage, the extensive list of anti-aging products offered at the beauty counter and solicitations from the AARP. In her new collection of humorous essays, "I See You Made An Effort: Compliments, Indignities, and Survival Stories from the Edge of 50" (Blue Rider Press, 256 pp., $25.95), the actress, comedian and writer examines the experiences that come with aging, whether falling in lust with the guy working at the Apple Genius bar, watching a best friend struggle with pancreatic cancer or a growing sense of invisibility - "an alternate universe, one that exists in exactly the same space-time, but is unseen by those who are younger.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 29, 2014 | By Susan King
Carl Reiner wakes up each morning with the same thought - it's time to start writing. It's still the top priority for the Emmy Award-winning funny man who created the landmark CBS sitcom "The Dick Van Dyke Show," wrote and directed such comedy film favorites as 1970's "Where's Poppa?," 1977's "Oh , God!" and 1979's "The Jerk" and who, along with his lifetime friend Mel Brooks, performed the "2000 Year Old Man" routines. "I get to my computer and I either play solitaire or do some tweets," said Reiner (who, for the record, has more than 62,000 Twitter followers)
BUSINESS
March 28, 2014 | By Andrea Chang
It's long been the stuff of science fiction, the ability to wear a headset and feel as if you're in another world. Creating an affordable virtual reality device for the mass market has been the holy grail of sorts for game developers and futurists. Now Facebook's $2-billion purchase of Oculus may bring that dream one step closer to reality. Virtual reality enthusiasts say they've been waiting for decades for the technology to take off and have been developing headsets and content in the hopes they could soon have mainstream appeal.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 27, 2014 | By David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
Matt Taibbi begins his sixth book, "The Divide: American Injustice in the Age of the Wealth Gap," with a simple formulation: "Poverty goes up; Crime goes down; Prison population doubles. " It's a snapshot, a way to represent what Taibbi sees as the through-the-looking-glass reality of contemporary America, where rule of law has been subverted by, on the one hand, corporate greed and, on the other, a kind of institutionalized abuse of the poor. Such a landscape, he suggests, brings to mind the last days of the Soviet Union, which operated out of a similar sort of mass hypocrisy until, in 1990 and '91, "people were permitted to think about all this and question the unwritten rules out loud, [and]
ENTERTAINMENT
March 27, 2014 | By Inkoo Kang
Rarely has the zone between girlhood and womanhood been captured with such urgent honesty than in Eliza Hittman's superb teen drama "It Felt Like Love. " Hittman's debut isn't just a brilliantly tactile study of the mounting sexual curiosity and frustration of 14-year-old Lila (Gina Piersanti); it's also an important landmark in the oft-ignored subgenre of realistic movies about female adolescence. Lila doesn't want a boyfriend. She wants something better. When the working-class Brooklyn teen observes her slightly older but infinitely more sexually experienced friend Chiara (Giovanna Salimeni)
ENTERTAINMENT
March 21, 2014 | By Scott Martelle
Early in his new history of humanity's embrace of nuclear energy and radiation, Craig Nelson writes about the impoverished 19-year-old Manya Sklowdowska and her lover, Casimir Zorawski, the eldest child in a wealthy Polish farming family for whom she worked as a nanny. His parents rejected the girl as below their station. The college-student son acquiesced, married someone else and went on to become a "well-regarded mathematician in Poland. " The jilted Manya became Marie Curie. The story of the star-crossed lovers and the unforeseen consequences of a single decision dovetail nicely with the sweep of our engagement with nuclear science.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 20, 2014 | By Robert Abele
Sensitively observed, the indie drama "A Birder's Guide to Everything" concerns a gangly 15-year-old birder prodigy named David (Kodi Smit-McPhee) with a timely distraction on the eve of his widower father (James Le Gros) marrying his girlfriend: the sighting of a supposedly extinct duck unseen since the 19th century. Spurred by a local ornithology legend (a sublimely eccentric Ben Kingsley) to find it before it migrates, David, his Young Birders Society chums (Alex Wolff, Michael Chen)
ENTERTAINMENT
March 20, 2014 | By Steve Appleford
AUSTIN, Texas - Robert Duvall first came to Texas when he was 10, a San Diego military brat on a visit to his mother's family. It would be his first time on a horse, and his first encounter with the people he would later come to know so well. "These aunts would back up to the fire and lift their skirts to warm their behinds, and I never saw that before," says Duvall, now 83, sitting with a bowl of soup at this city's old Driskill Hotel. "The name of the family was Hart, so we said 'They warmed their hearts.'" He's never lived in the Lone Star State, but he was embraced as a cultural icon here after his acclaimed performance as Capt.
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