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Agent Orange

ENTERTAINMENT
April 4, 1995 | MIKE BOEHM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"You gotta keep 'em separated" goes the refrain that helped make Offspring's "Come Out and Play" a huge hit last year on radio and MTV. * But the publisher of a classic Orange County punk song that Offspring songwriter Bryan (Dexter) Holland has cited as an important influence maintains that Holland failed to do just that when it came to recording the snaky Arabian guitar hook that figures prominently in "Come Out and Play."
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NEWS
January 8, 1995 | GEORGE ESPER, ASSOCIATED PRESS
As commander of the U.S. naval forces in the Vietnam War from 1968 to 1970, Adm. Elmo Zumwalt Jr. always read the daily casualty list from the bottom to the top. That's because his eldest son, Elmo Zumwalt III, was serving in Vietnam at the same time under his command. "Because they were listed alphabetically, I always knew the last name on the list would be Zumwalt if there were a casualty," recalls the retired admiral, who recently returned to Vietnam for a visit with some of his former foes.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 30, 1994 | THAO HUA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For Edward W. Medvit of Anaheim, the Vietnam War isn't over. Every day, he experiences pain he believes was caused by Agent Orange. On Dec. 21, Medvit joined thousands of veterans filing last-minute claims for compensation from the Agent Orange Settlement Fund, which was set up by seven companies responsible for manufacturing the chemical defoliant the United States used during the Vietnam War.
NEWS
September 10, 1994 | From Associated Press
In a bittersweet journey after 25 years, retired Adm. Elmo Zumwalt Jr. returned to Vietnam on Friday for the first time since he ordered the spraying of the defoliant Agent Orange that he believes led to the cancer death of his son. "It feels nostalgic," he said. "It's good to be back. I have for many years wanted to come to discuss important policy issues with the government of Vietnam."
NEWS
November 21, 1993
I was very moved by H.G. Reza's piece on Vietnam veterans ("For Veterans, Life--Like War--Needs Courage," Nov. 11) until I came to the second-to-last paragraph: "Frank and Walt took walks in the sun that lasted longer than the combined duration of our adventures in Grenada and Panama and the conflict with Iraq . . . " This smacks of the same type of condescension some Vietnam veterans complained of when their experiences were initially dismissed by...
NEWS
November 11, 1993 | H.G. REZA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
My nephew did not know what to make of the dirty, blond man who approached us in the restaurant parking lot with a spray bottle in one hand and a soiled rag in the other. The stranger appeared to be my age, in his mid-40s, and his embarrassment was obvious when he asked if he could clean the windshield. Speaking with a soft Southern drawl, he struggled to explain that he had not always been homeless. He said his name was Brian. "Mister, I'm not a bum," he said with emotion in his eyes.
NEWS
July 28, 1993 | MARLENE CIMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Veterans Affairs Secretary Jesse Brown announced Tuesday that Vietnam veterans suffering from Hodgkin's disease and an uncommon liver disorder will be eligible for special disability payments based on their presumed exposure to Agent Orange and other herbicides.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 11, 1993 | MIKE BOEHM
When the Punk met the Godfather 20 years ago in a scene from the Who's rock opera, "Quadrophenia," generational warfare raged. Pete Townshend's song, "The Punk Meets the Godfather," was a mudslinging dialogue in which the Punk, a musical upstart from a new g-g-g-generation, thumbed his nose at an established rock idol, the Godfather. In a climactic moment, the young gun fired off a taunt that no guitar hero could tolerate: "Your ax belongs to a dying nation."
NEWS
August 22, 1992 | LESLIE HELM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After he returned from Vietnam in 1966, Hong Seung Uk's bones began to ache and strange spots appeared on his skin. Rheumatism, the doctors told him. When his son was born mentally retarded and with deformed legs, Hong and his wife ascribed it to bad luck. Today, Hong's chest is paralyzed and he must breathe through a pipe in his chest.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 29, 1991 | ELIE A. SHNEOUR, Elie A. Shneour is director of Biosystems Institutes Inc. and director of Biosystems Research Institute in San Diego
Sodium chloride--table salt--is a critical ingredient for all living things. But when a relatively small amount of it was accidentally substituted for the milk-sugar lactose in a baby formula, it caused fatal poisoning. Sodium chloride can be made in the laboratory by mixing about equal amounts of lye (sodium hydroxide) and hydrochloric acid. Both lye and hydrochloric acids are powerfully corrosive substances that can maim and kill in very small quantities.
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