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NEWS
March 30, 1990 | CINDY LaFAVRE YORKS, Yorks, a free-lance writer regularly contributes to The Times fashion pages
Fashion models over age 40 who once kept their gray at bay are rediscovering their roots--and capitalizing on a market with potential growth. U.S. magazines such as Mirabella, Lear's and Moxie (based in Woodland Hills), that cater to mature audiences, are filling their pages with, "women who weren't born yesterday," as the Lear's promotional line reads. And, even traditional high fashion magazines such as Harper's Bazaar are devoting more space to seasoned models.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 25, 2014 | By Gary Goldstein
There's a twinkly dual meaning to the title of the French import "Bright Days Ahead. " It refers to the optimistic name of a seaside town's senior activities club as well as to the immediate future of the group's newest member, 60-year-old retired dentist Caroline (Fanny Ardant, gorgeous and self-assured). How director Marion Vernoux, who co-wrote with Fanny Chesnel (based on Chesnel's novel), melds these two halves makes for an enjoyable and unfussy portrait of growing older - and feeling younger.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 20, 2001
A Times staff writer speculates that Elizabeth Hurley, Julianne Moore, Patrick Swayze, Forest Whitaker and "aging rocker Mick Jagger" are expected to attend the Sundance Film Festival (In the Know, Jan. 15). By stating that only Jagger, 57, is "aging," and implying that the others are not, you have conveyed important insight about a biological process that I had mistakenly understood to begin at one's birth. Thank you for this valuable information. I look forward to future items regarding activities of Jagger's contemporaries, including aging Barbra Streisand, aging Steve Martin and aging Michael Douglas.
SPORTS
April 25, 2014 | By Chuck Schilken
Herschel Walker has no plans of playing pro football again. But it has nothing to do with the fact that he's more than half a century old. Instead, the former college, USFL and NFL star told USA Today that he's just too busy with multiple business ventures to suit up again. Otherwise, Walker said, he truly believes he could be successful as part of a running-back platoon. “I can play in the NFL today,” he said . “I couldn't take every snap. But running backs nowadays don't play every down.
HOME & GARDEN
October 23, 2010
Retired dental surgeon Gene Schklair used to concentrate on giving people a nice smile; now he concentrates on giving art patrons something to smile about. Schklair gave up cosmetic dentistry to become a full-time sculptor. His whimsical, life-size figures sell for as much as $18,000 each. Not bad for an octogenarian who's working on his second career. And Schklair, 80, is only one of many creative people who are working on second careers at Burbank Senior Artists Colony, a twist on senior housing that encourages residents to expand their horizons at a time when many people are beginning to narrow the scale of their lives.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 17, 1992
So scientists have "drawn back the veil on the mystery of aging" (Feb. 8). By manipulation of what some call "Methuselah" genes, scientists have doubled the life spans of flies and roundworms to a human equivalent of 150 years. The secret to long life was given in the report: The scientists culled the "Methuselah" genes by delaying reproduction, restricting food and increasing extreme environmental stress. So, to enjoy a longe life, abstain from sex, embrace anorexia and live in a city rife with crime, pollution and decay.
OPINION
May 27, 2005
The May 20 editorial, "Gory Games and Free Speech," was off the mark in saying, "Parents are understandably frustrated by games that encourage their children to shoot, maim and degrade increasingly realistic and movie-like characters." As the average video game player is now 30 years old, it makes (dollars and) sense for games to be geared mainly to that age group. Parents should, of course, monitor what their kids play. Yet, as a 50-year-old gamer, I'm immune to gore and violence as I've been exposed to it for decades and I've yet to kill or maim anyone because of it. Jeff Yablan Los Angeles
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 29, 1989
Old age will be the focus of a new multi-disciplinary research center organized by UCLA and the Jewish Homes for the Aging of Greater Los Angeles. One of the first of its kind in the United States, the Borun Center for Gerontological Research, will conduct studies on the social, economic, environmental and psychological problems associated with aging. In the next 30 years, the number of people over the age of 65 in California is expected to double to more than 6 million, causing burdens on families and health-care professionals.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 19, 1999
In his review of the PBS program "Stealing Time: The New Science of Aging" (" 'Stealing Time' Looks at Advances in the Science of Human Aging," June 2), Robert Hotz says "one of the greatest triumphs of the 20th century is the doubling of the typical human life span since 1900." My understanding is that the human life span is no different than it was in biblical times. That is, the oldest people today are no older than they were back then. What has changed considerably is the human life expectancy.
NEWS
October 6, 1989
My compliments to David Larsen for his splendid article "The Aged Mind: More Care Needed" (Sept. 19). There is one very important factor, however, that apparently was not considered at the two-day national conference at UCLA on mental health and aging. That very important factor covers the feelings of self-worth of the aging. The thrill and excitement of life is in direct proportion to our ability to personally set goals and bring about their achievement no matter how small or large they may be. Some of the conditions that seem to work against the older person setting and achieving goals are: --People begin to "help" us. --Mates increase their dominance or dependence, making it more difficult to develop and live as individuals.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 24, 2014 | Ann Friedman
With every click, every tweet, every share, am I being exploited or am I taking advantage of the digital revolution? This is the question I kept asking myself as I read Astra Taylor's "The People's Platform: Taking Back Power and Culture in the Digital Age. " Taylor makes a thorough case that the technological advances we've been told constitute progress - that anyone can start a blog, that we can easily keep up with our friends (and frenemies)...
SCIENCE
April 21, 2014 | By Monte Morin
Scientists say they have developed a means of accurately dating Earth's oldest and densest polar ice by analyzing the composition of krypton gas trapped within ancient air bubbles. In a study published Monday in the journal PNAS , researchers used the new dating method, called Atom Trap Trace Analysis, or ATTA, to study ice recovered from the McMurdo Dry Valleys in Antarctica. "The oldest ice found in drilled cores is around 800,000 years old, and with this new technique we think we can look in other regions and successfully date polar ice back as far as 1.5 million years," lead study author Christo Buizert, an Oregon State University paleoclimatologist, said in a statement.
SPORTS
April 20, 2014 | By Mike DiGiovanna
DETROIT - Mark McGwire was in the twilight of his career in 2001, willing his broken-down body through one final season with the St. Louis Cardinals, when a strapping young buck named Albert Pujols, just two years removed from being the 402nd overall pick in the draft, started tearing it up in spring training. Bobby Bonilla was slated to be the Cardinals' left fielder, but when Bonilla was hurt that spring, McGwire practically commandeered the lineup card from Manager Tony La Russa.
BUSINESS
April 20, 2014 | By Walter Hamilton
Debbie Rohr lives with her husband and twin teenage sons in a well-tended three-bedroom home in Salinas. The ranch-style house has a spacious kitchen that looks out on a yard filled with rosebushes. It's a modest but comfortable house, the type that Rohr, 52, pictured for herself at this stage of life. She just never imagined that it would be her childhood home, a return to a bedroom where she once hung posters of Olivia Newton-John and curled up with her beloved Mrs. Beasley doll.
HOME & GARDEN
April 19, 2014 | Chris Erskine
A boy. A dad. A mid-April hike. "Baseball should have bowl games," the fifth-grader says. "I like the way you think," I say. Up the hill we go, like shadows on a wall - first him, then me. We are determined to hike all the way to his elementary school, about a mile up toward the clouds. It is a route we take five times a week by car, there and back, there and back, on the hamster wheel of suburban life. In the Saturday morning sunlight, I see the boyishness in his face - the breakfast in the corners of his mouth.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 19, 2014 | By Dan Weikel
Visibility was 10 miles and the morning sun had pushed the temperature close to 90 as Danny Joe Hall guided his mile-long Union Pacific freight train east through the grasslands of the Oklahoma Panhandle. Near the farming town of Goodwell, federal investigators said, the 56-year-old engineer sped through a series of yellow and red signals warning him to slow down and stop for a Los Angeles-bound train moving slowly onto a side track. The 83-mph collision killed Hall and two crewmen.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 3, 1998 | ROB SELNA
Patricia Longo, a longtime Ventura resident and advocate for the elderly, recently was named chairwoman of the California Commission on Aging. Longo, onetime Ventura deputy mayor and member of the South Coast Area Transit system board, was first appointed to the 25-member commission by Gov. Pete Wilson in 1993. She was asked to serve a second term in 1996 and elected to a one-year term as chairwoman in December.
BUSINESS
September 17, 1995
James Flanigan's column ("The High Cost of Undervaluing Work by Women," Sept. 10) mentions in passing an area of activity that warrants more detailed exegesis: caring for elderly relatives. The increasing proportion of the population that lives past retirement and into old age continues to be the largest fact of social life as we prepare for the next century. Unfortunately, this impact continues to be discussed in terms limited by debates over the future of Medicare and Social Security--as important as these issues are, the phenomenon of aging will affect our social lives more broadly than would be expected by the arcane financial discussions that result.
SPORTS
April 11, 2014 | Bill Dwyre
LAS VEGAS - They are asking all the wrong people here to predict the outcome of Saturday night's fight between Manny Pacquiao and Tim Bradley. Sportswriters? Are you kidding? This analysis demands a bit more depth than arguing the merits of the designated hitter. Too bad Sigmund Freud has departed us. His insights into these two fighters could be both learned and insightful. In the blue corner, from the Philippines, is the congressman from the Sarangani district, Manny Pacquiao, with a record of 55-5-2 and 38 knockouts.
SCIENCE
April 7, 2014 | By Melissa Healy
By the time they have reached the fourth grade, African American boys who have run a childhood gantlet of poverty, shifting family structure, harsh parenting and a mother's low mood and educational attainment will have signs of premature genetic aging that can deepen their vulnerability to mental and physical illness, says a new study. And the toll of environmental stresses on a child's cells is even more pronounced when that child has inherited a constellation of genetic variations that make him more sensitive to privation or privilege, the authors of this new research have found.
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