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OPINION
June 18, 2013
Re "Menopause: Is men's taste to blame?," June 15 The report provides scant evidence that a genetic mutation caused menopause in aging women, that male preference for young women is responsible for the accumulation of that gene over time, or that men are reproductively fertile until death despite their young female partners. In fact, menopausal women tend to outlive men. As such, menopause may have arisen because of a set of complex genes contributing to longevity that enabled survival beyond a woman's ability to reproduce.
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SCIENCE
November 26, 2013 | By Melissa Healy
  For many women, the end of fertility--and the sharp drop in circulating estrogen and progesterone that comes with it-- is a time of forgotten keys, tip-of-the-tongue moments with names and words, and a malaise that can morph into all-out depression. Naturally enough, many believe there is a causal link here, and wonder whether hormone replacement therapy might hold at bay the mood and cognitive changes that commonly occur at midlife. Scientists, too, have been debating the relationship between sex hormones, mood and cognition, and whether there exists a "critical window" following menopause when propped-up levels of sex hormones might change a woman's mood or mental performance as she ages.
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SCIENCE
November 26, 2013 | By Melissa Healy
  For many women, the end of fertility--and the sharp drop in circulating estrogen and progesterone that comes with it-- is a time of forgotten keys, tip-of-the-tongue moments with names and words, and a malaise that can morph into all-out depression. Naturally enough, many believe there is a causal link here, and wonder whether hormone replacement therapy might hold at bay the mood and cognitive changes that commonly occur at midlife. Scientists, too, have been debating the relationship between sex hormones, mood and cognition, and whether there exists a "critical window" following menopause when propped-up levels of sex hormones might change a woman's mood or mental performance as she ages.
OPINION
June 18, 2013
Re "Menopause: Is men's taste to blame?," June 15 The report provides scant evidence that a genetic mutation caused menopause in aging women, that male preference for young women is responsible for the accumulation of that gene over time, or that men are reproductively fertile until death despite their young female partners. In fact, menopausal women tend to outlive men. As such, menopause may have arisen because of a set of complex genes contributing to longevity that enabled survival beyond a woman's ability to reproduce.
NEWS
February 17, 1989 | ROSE-MARIE TURK, Times Staff Writer
Why would any woman buck the tide, turn her back on modern cosmetology and choose, a la Barbara Bush, to flaunt her white hair? The answer, in a bit more than three words: confidence, compliments and more pressing commitments.
NEWS
July 28, 1996 | From Associated Press
Women: Want to postpone those fine facial lines, stave off unsightly crow's feet? The advice from two dermatologists is to stop smoking. They cite studies indicating smoking causes certain skin conditions and, perhaps worst of all, premature aging of the face. It all translates into wrinkles, and it happens more often with women than men. For many smokers, "it doesn't seem to impress them that they may die of lung disease or heart disease.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 20, 1997 | DARRELL SATZMAN
Health concerns of middle-age women will be the focus of a free seminar tonight at Kaiser Permanente Hospital in Woodland Hills. "Life Choices" will feature four speakers discussing issues ranging from medical and natural alternatives for managing menopause to sexuality and relationships. The speakers will also answer questions from the audience, Kaiser officials said.
NEWS
March 28, 1985 | URSULA VILS, Times Staff Writer
The title of her keynote talk before the Western Gerontological Society's 31st annual meeting here was "Power and Justice for Older Women: The Feminization of Poverty," but Rep. Patricia Schroeder (D-Colo.) addressed what she views as an alarming new mind-set in America: selfishness. "America has always stood up for what was right, for helping people in need as we would help members of our family," Schroeder said. "We see now a new mind-set. We are not a family anymore but a team.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 30, 1995 | From Times staff and wire reports
Even Bronze Age women had osteoporosis despite their presumably active lives, according to researchers from the Vienna University Hospital. The team reported in the New England Journal of Medicine that they used X-rays to determine the density of bones from 14 women buried at Unterhautzental, Austria, and found that they were about 11% less dense than bones from five men, indicating that the women were at greater risk for fractures.
NEWS
November 19, 1985 | Jack Smith
I had an idea the other day that I would be taken to task for writing that "the most beautiful women I have seen are the women of Paris." "I think it is in their genes," I said; "or perhaps it is diet. Most of them look lean and hard, with good legs and small breasts, high cheekbones, flat cheeks, and eyes large and wide apart. And of course they are chic." A man who belongs to a club I belong to pulled me aside at a meeting the other night and said, "Have you ever been in Stockholm?"
ENTERTAINMENT
May 13, 2011 | By Susan Salter Reynolds, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Sometimes you just want someone to tell it to you straight. You may look and feel better than your grandmother or even your mother did at 50 but the idea that 50 is anything like 30, Tracey Jackson practically screams, is either a marketing scam or a line made up by a 50-year-old guy in a bar trying to pick up a 30-year-old woman. We are fixated on youth. This is not news and, by her own account, no one has tried harder than Tracey Jackson to stay young. Although her grandmother swore by Crisco to defeat wrinkles, Jackson, 52 and a screenwriter in Southern California, has access to the latest anti-aging promises; Bikram yoga and Core Fusion (her preferred, one hour a day, six days a week regimen)
HEALTH
May 2, 2011 | HealthKey
By Amanda Leigh Mascarelli As we age, our bones become thinner and more porous. No one disputes that. For the first four decades of life, men and women's bones undergo a continual renewal, shedding collagen and then rebuilding through mineralization — a process that plateaus in midlife for both men and women. But whereas men's bone density typically declines gradually over their lifetimes, bone loss accelerates rapidly for women during menopause because of the lack of estrogen.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 16, 2010 | By Christie Mellor, Special to the Los Angeles Times
So here we are, at an age we thought happened only to our mothers. We thought we'd be wearing heavy gold bracelets by now and learning about wine. In Italian. While we traveled the world. Doing Yoga. The children — if we had children — should have launched themselves into successful adulthoods, so we could go trekking in Patagonia and dabble in watercolors, gently dispensing wisdom and sassy quips. We expect any minute we'll be full of infinite beauty and graceful maturity.
SCIENCE
October 27, 2009 | Shari Roan
Middle-aged men still have higher rates of heart attacks and heart disease than middle-aged women, but those gender differences appear to be narrowing, according to a study published Monday. The findings follow earlier research, published in a 2007 issue of the journal Neurology, establishing that stroke prevalence among women ages 45 to 54 was double that of men of the same age. Together, the findings suggest "an ominous trend in cardiovascular health among midlife women," said the lead author of both studies, Dr. Amytis Towfighi, an assistant professor of neurology at the University of Southern California.
HEALTH
May 8, 2006 | Susan Brink, Times Staff Writer
SOMEWHERE, in most women's conscious or unconscious minds, is the unspoken expectation that, if their marriages or relationships last, they will most likely outlive their partners. They know that their children, for whom they're primarily in charge, will grow up and leave. And they face a barrage of advertising and other societal cues that subtly but ever so steadily suggest that they're not getting older, they're getting invisible.
NEWS
August 22, 2004 | Aiko Hayashi, Associated Press Writer
Five years ago Japanese women's rights advocates won their battle to legalize the birth control pill. Now they are waging an even tougher fight -- getting women to use it. "I don't know anyone who is on the pill among my friends, and we don't really talk about it," said Junko Okihiro, 24, a software company engineer. Okihiro and her friends are the vast majority in Japan. About 370,000 Japanese women use the pill, according to estimates, only 1.
SPORTS
August 6, 1989 | THOMAS BONK, Times Staff Writer
The end is still not in sight for Martina Navratilova--and no, she didn't start wearing glasses because otherwise she wouldn't be able to see retirement before it hits her smack in the face. Why quit now? Sure, she will be 33 in three months. But what would the women's tennis scene look like if Navratilova weren't around? Steffi Graf would be all by her lonesome. So, whether she knows it or not, tennis probably needs Navratilova as much as she needs tennis.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 19, 2003 | Manohla Dargis, Times Staff Writer
One of the most popular British imports in recent years is what might be called the tea-cozy movie. Brimming with the most twinkly eccentrics this side of the Shire, with stories of tidy emotional uplift and unsullied locales straight from the national tourist board, the tea-cozy movie means to wrap you in warmth from your nose to your toes. English directors such as Mike Leigh may traffic in hot reality, but over here we often prefer our Brits tepid.
HEALTH
November 11, 2002 | Jane E. Allen, Times Staff Writer
Heavy menstrual periods are more than an inconvenience. They exact a significant economic toll. American women who suffer severe bleeding and cramping miss nearly a month of work and lose work time valued at nearly $1,700, on average, each year, researchers report in the first attempt to quantify the financial impact. Dr. David Cumming, a professor of obstetrics and gynecology at the University of Alberta in Canada, analyzed data from nearly 2,800 U.S.
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