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Aging Women

HEALTH
September 23, 2002 | JANE E. ALLEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Today's consumers have a seemingly insatiable appetite for health information. They find it via the Internet, television, radio, newspapers, magazines and, in one of the most convenient forms, newsletters. Dozens of paid subscription newsletters, generally running eight to 12 pages, are mailed directly to homes from hospitals, universities and prominent doctors. Hundreds more are sent free by organizations such as health plans as a promotional tool. Competition has been fierce.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 12, 1998 | MARK EVANS, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Caring for an elderly, ailing parent can be heartbreaking duty for anyone. A new study suggests that is literally the case as well, and that daughters may be most at risk. Stanford University research presented recently measured the cardiovascular distress of women caring at home for their parents and spouses, all suffering from dementia. The findings showed that heart rates and blood pressure of daughters rose more than did wives' during social interactions with the ailing loved one.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 20, 1997 | DARRELL SATZMAN
Health concerns of middle-age women will be the focus of a free seminar tonight at Kaiser Permanente Hospital in Woodland Hills. "Life Choices" will feature four speakers discussing issues ranging from medical and natural alternatives for managing menopause to sexuality and relationships. The speakers will also answer questions from the audience, Kaiser officials said.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 24, 1996 | CLAUDIA PUIG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Could it be that being middle-aged and female has become a Hollywood box-office asset? Judging from the runaway success of Paramount's "The First Wives Club"--which shattered box-office doldrums this weekend by taking in a record-breaking $18.9 million--things may be turning around for a demographic that has been noticeably absent from the screen.
NEWS
July 28, 1996 | From Associated Press
Women: Want to postpone those fine facial lines, stave off unsightly crow's feet? The advice from two dermatologists is to stop smoking. They cite studies indicating smoking causes certain skin conditions and, perhaps worst of all, premature aging of the face. It all translates into wrinkles, and it happens more often with women than men. For many smokers, "it doesn't seem to impress them that they may die of lung disease or heart disease.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 4, 1995 | From Times staff and wire reports
Even Bronze Age women had osteoporosis despite their presumably active lives, according to researchers from the Vienna University Hospital. The team reported in the New England Journal of Medicine that they used X-rays to determine the density of bones from 14 women buried at Unterhautzental, Austria, and found that they were about 11% less dense than bones from five men, indicating that the women were at greater risk for fractures.
NEWS
September 26, 1995 | GREG MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When a helmeted referee dropped a hockey puck on the center of an Anaheim ice rink Sunday afternoon, it wasn't just to start one of the dozens of recreational hockey games that take place across the Southland each weekend. It was also to strike a blow for gender equity. The teams on both sides of the referee were part of what, to the best of anyone's knowledge, is the first amateur hockey league in Southern California established exclusively for women.
NEWS
July 25, 1995 | SHARI ROAN, TIMES HEALTH WRITER
It wasn't exactly the part-time job Rebecca Weis was looking for last year while scanning the jobs bulletin board at Sacramento City College. Ovum Donors Needed , read the notice from Pacific Fertility Center in San Francisco. "I am applying to medical school, so I'm interested in all this stuff," says Weis, now 23, married and childless. "And I thought it would be nice to help somebody else out."
NEWS
July 17, 1994 | MONA GABLE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Let's see now. You've gotten in touch with your shadow, but it keeps abandoning you. You've reclaimed your inner child, but your inner mom is still nagging you. You've done so many past lives workshops you don't know whether you're Anne Boleyn or Eleanor Roosevelt or Dr. Quinn, Medicine Woman. Before you start shrieking your truth, is it possible you've been overdoing the self-help thing? That your quest to become whole has become, well . . . an addiction?
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