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BUSINESS
February 28, 1991
* A default by Iraq on agriculture loans guaranteed by the Agriculture Department has forced the federal government to pay out millions of dollars to banks that loaned the money, an official said. Ten U.S. banks recently lodged claims totaling $599 million with the department's Commodity Credit Corp., which guaranteed the loans to Iraq, said CCC Treasurer James Little. A total of $148 million had already been paid to claimants as of Feb. 22.
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NEWS
October 28, 1995 | From Associated Press
More than 750 grocery stores, liquor outlets and other merchants, many with little or no food on the shelves, were kicked out of the federal food stamp program Friday in the latest crackdown by the Agriculture Department. Many of the stores were expelled because they fail to meet the government's rules for selling the proper mix of staple or wholesome foods. Other stores were nonexistent, and up to a hundred are suspected of criminal activity, department officials said.
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NEWS
October 28, 1995 | From Associated Press
More than 750 grocery stores, liquor outlets and other merchants, many with little or no food on the shelves, were kicked out of the federal food stamp program Friday in the latest crackdown by the Agriculture Department. Many of the stores were expelled because they fail to meet the government's rules for selling the proper mix of staple or wholesome foods. Other stores were nonexistent, and up to a hundred are suspected of criminal activity, department officials said.
BUSINESS
February 28, 1991
* A default by Iraq on agriculture loans guaranteed by the Agriculture Department has forced the federal government to pay out millions of dollars to banks that loaned the money, an official said. Ten U.S. banks recently lodged claims totaling $599 million with the department's Commodity Credit Corp., which guaranteed the loans to Iraq, said CCC Treasurer James Little. A total of $148 million had already been paid to claimants as of Feb. 22.
BUSINESS
August 22, 1985
According to the Agriculture Department, U.S. farm exports for the fiscal year that ends Sept. 30 will total about $32 billion, down 16% from the more than $38 billion reported in 1983-84. The new report showed a $1.5-billion decline from that mark and indicated that the slump will extend into the next fiscal year. This year's slide "is attributable to sluggish demand, increased foreign supplies and the ability of competitors to undercut U.S. prices," it said.
NEWS
April 15, 1985
A federal judge in Portland will hear arguments in a 3-year-old lawsuit that challenges a massive federal document governing chemical spray efforts to eradicate the gypsy moth. If the plaintiffs convince the judge that the government's environmental impact statement is inadequate, all states --including California and numerous gypsy moth-infested East Coast states--may be prohibited from proceeding with plans to use synthetic chemical insecticides to control gypsy moths.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 30, 1998
The fiscal 1999 appropriations bill for the Agriculture Department, passed by the House and likely to clear the Senate, contains a provision that would greatly strengthen the hand of a group aggrieved for good reason: African American farmers. It would also help untangle a complicated mess that was only made worse in 1983 when President Ronald Reagan virtually dismantled the civil rights office of the U.S. Department of Agriculture.
NATIONAL
May 20, 2004 | From the Washington Post
The Agriculture Department allowed U.S. meatpackers to resume imports of processed beef from Canada in September, just weeks after it publicly reaffirmed its ban on importing those products because mad cow disease had been found in Canadian cattle. In the next six months, 33 million pounds of Canadian processed beef was imported under a series of undisclosed permits the USDA issued to the meatpackers.
BUSINESS
November 8, 2000 | Reuters
Japan, the single biggest buyer of American corn, resumed its purchases with a 127,000-ton order days after the U.S. government agreed to begin testing to prevent StarLink gene-spliced corn from tainting exports, the U.S. Agriculture Department said. U.S. and Japanese officials spent two weeks negotiating a testing plan to satisfy Tokyo's demands that StarLink be prevented from contaminating any corn shipments.
BUSINESS
March 13, 2002 | JESSICA BRICE, ASSOCIATED PRESS
The lettuce in Arizona should be ready for harvest, but it's not. The lettuce in Central California won't be ready for at least four more weeks. That leaves California facing one of its worst lettuce shortages and highest prices in 15 years, according to state agricultural specialists. And when California has a shortage, the whole nation has a shortage. The result has been lettuce costing up to $3 a head.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 28, 1996 | THAO HUA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Dang Nhi returned from Vietnam this month, she had a collection of souvenirs, including four packages of cha bong, nestled inside her canvas suitcase. To the 23-year-old Anaheim woman, the dried shredded pork, marinated in sauce made from fresh fish netted off of Vietnam's coast, was a prized gift for relatives in America.
NEWS
January 28, 1996 | THAO HUA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Nhi Dang returned from Vietnam earlier this month, she had a collection of souvenirs, including four packages of cha bong, nestled inside her canvas suitcase. To the 23-year-old Anaheim woman, the dried shredded pork, marinated in sauce made from fresh fish netted off of Vietnam's coast, was a prized gift for relatives in America.
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