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November 16, 2007 | From a Times staff writer
Italy's renowned La Scala opera house, following the Metropolitan Opera's recent foray into cinema transmissions, is coming to a multiplex near you. The Franco Zeffirelli production of Giuseppe Verdi's "Aida," presented by Screenvision, will be shown in 40 movie theaters nationwide in high definition and Dolby surround sound. Locally, the opera, marking Zeffirelli's return to La Scala after a 14-year absence, will screen at 2 and 5:30 p.m. on Dec.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 16, 2007 | From a Times staff writer
Italy's renowned La Scala opera house, following the Metropolitan Opera's recent foray into cinema transmissions, is coming to a multiplex near you. The Franco Zeffirelli production of Giuseppe Verdi's "Aida," presented by Screenvision, will be shown in 40 movie theaters nationwide in high definition and Dolby surround sound. Locally, the opera, marking Zeffirelli's return to La Scala after a 14-year absence, will screen at 2 and 5:30 p.m. on Dec.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 9, 2005 | Don Shirley
Broadway and many touring shows almost went dark last summer in a dispute between producers and Actors' Equity Assn. The biggest bone of contention was the contract governing tours. A strike was averted only after both sides agreed to an "experimental" contract for musical tours that set up seven graduated tiers of compensation for actors, depending on a show's perceived revenue potential. The first tour to use the contract is underway.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 18, 2007 | From the Associated Press
On a day's notice, with no rehearsal, Roberto Alagna jumped in for an ailing tenor to sing "Aida" -- 10 months after he stormed off an Italian stage when he was booed in the same role. The incident at Milan's La Scala last December triggered a worldwide uproar. In the next episode, played out Tuesday night at the Metropolitan Opera in New York, Alagna got a standing ovation. The 44-year-old French-born son of a Sicilian bricklayer was filling in for tenor Marco Berti, who fell ill Monday.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 18, 2007 | From the Associated Press
On a day's notice, with no rehearsal, Roberto Alagna jumped in for an ailing tenor to sing "Aida" -- 10 months after he stormed off an Italian stage when he was booed in the same role. The incident at Milan's La Scala last December triggered a worldwide uproar. In the next episode, played out Tuesday night at the Metropolitan Opera in New York, Alagna got a standing ovation. The 44-year-old French-born son of a Sicilian bricklayer was filling in for tenor Marco Berti, who fell ill Monday.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 15, 1990 | BARBARA ISENBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
What has been billed as "the breathtaking, world renowned production" of Giuseppe Verdi's "Aida" is having some trouble filling the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum on June 29 and 30. The first performance was canceled last week, according to a spokesman for the Coliseum. The highly publicized $7-million production has so far sold only about 6,000 tickets, said Robbie Williams, production manager for Montreal-based International Opera Festival, which has been producing the event around the world.
NEWS
January 20, 2005 | Irene Lacher, Special to The Times
"Stand by, elephants!" The elephants in question were gath- ered in a habitat that's unusually elegant -- the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion. The herd awaited its cue from a stage manager directing traffic at a Los Angeles Opera rehearsal for "Aida," the grandest of the grand in opera repertory, the elephant of operas -- literally and figuratively. At "Aida's" 1871 world premiere in Cairo, 12 elephants joined a double chorus in the scene welcoming a brave soldier's return from battle.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 5, 2008 | From the Associated Press
PITTSBURGH -- Desperate artistic times called for desperate artistic measures. So when the tenor got sick, the conductor stepped in to save the performance of "Aida." Pittsburgh Opera musical director Antony Walker sang into a microphone from the pit while still conducting the orchestra as ailing tenor Vladimir Kuzmenko lip-synced on stage during the final act one night this week. "It was an amazing experience," Walker said. "I could feel the orchestra and the audience were with me.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 28, 1989 | BRUCE BURROUGHS
Hometown recitals can be very encouraging events, as Deborah Voigt discovered Saturday night at Cal State Fullerton. The prize-winning soprano, a native Californian and Fullerton alumna, possesses a strong, bright voice--and it has a heft, once taken for granted in opera, that now has become the exception rather than the rule. Understandably, she is looked to with an unusual degree of hope by voice-fanciers, who were out in force and prompt with acclaim.
NEWS
November 19, 1987 | Ann Conway
They dubbed it "An Evening on the Nile," but "Jewel of the Nile" could have been the title for the gala that lit up the Disneyland Hotel. More than 700 bejeweled guests flocked to the Egyptian-themed benefit that netted $75,000 for Opera Pacific, producer of opera in Orange County. But while the lorgnette set sipped, supped and swirled to Murray Korda's orchestra in a blaze of diamond baubles, a tiny anklet told another story.
NEWS
January 20, 2005 | Irene Lacher, Special to The Times
"Stand by, elephants!" The elephants in question were gath- ered in a habitat that's unusually elegant -- the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion. The herd awaited its cue from a stage manager directing traffic at a Los Angeles Opera rehearsal for "Aida," the grandest of the grand in opera repertory, the elephant of operas -- literally and figuratively. At "Aida's" 1871 world premiere in Cairo, 12 elephants joined a double chorus in the scene welcoming a brave soldier's return from battle.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 9, 2005 | Don Shirley
Broadway and many touring shows almost went dark last summer in a dispute between producers and Actors' Equity Assn. The biggest bone of contention was the contract governing tours. A strike was averted only after both sides agreed to an "experimental" contract for musical tours that set up seven graduated tiers of compensation for actors, depending on a show's perceived revenue potential. The first tour to use the contract is underway.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 15, 1990 | BARBARA ISENBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
What has been billed as "the breathtaking, world renowned production" of Giuseppe Verdi's "Aida" is having some trouble filling the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum on June 29 and 30. The first performance was canceled last week, according to a spokesman for the Coliseum. The highly publicized $7-million production has so far sold only about 6,000 tickets, said Robbie Williams, production manager for Montreal-based International Opera Festival, which has been producing the event around the world.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 1, 1994 | CHRIS PASLES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
From the age of 3, Maria Guleghina dreamed of being an opera singer. But as a child living in Odessa, Ukraine, her dream didn't bring her much joy. "Every time I sang, my friends laughed at me," Guleghina remembered over coffee recently. "I had such a large voice. They said, 'You sing like an elephant,' and I always cried." Her father would soothe her and tell her not to worry. "My father (a factory worker who died 12 years ago) had a beautiful voice," she recalled.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 29, 1996 | BENJAMIN EPSTEIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The morning practice sessions were rugged. So was the voice that answered the phone. "Right after rehearsal, my voice goes up, then it goes down, down, down," explained Camellia Johnson, reached at her hotel room in Tampa, Fla., where she appeared recently with the Florida Philharmonic Orchestra. "A few minutes ago I was on the phone, and the person at the front desk said, 'Yes, sir, may I help you?' " Johnson, a soprano, joins Carl St.
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