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Air Bag

NEWS
October 7, 1992 | RALPH VARTABEDIAN
Question: Why use a seat belt when driving a vehicle equipped with an air bag?W. D. Answer: The short answer is that the shoulder belt will provide significant additional protection. Studies of air bag effectiveness are problematic, partly because it is difficult to know why people don't die in major crashes--whether it is an air bag or seat belt that accounts for survival. But use of both is clearly superior to use of either one by itself, studies show.
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NEWS
October 28, 1995 | From Associated Press
The government's auto safety agency warned Friday that air bags could kill or seriously injure children who are not wearing seat belts. The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration is investigating the deaths of six children killed in car crashes in the past three years to see if their injuries were caused by the force of rapidly inflating air bags. "We're very concerned," Dr. Ricardo Martinez, the agency's administrator, said in an interview.
BUSINESS
August 17, 2008 | From Times Wire Reports
BMW AG is recalling 200,000 vehicles over concerns that the front passenger air bag may not deploy in a crash. The German automaker says the recall involves the 2006 3 Series, the 2004-06 5 Series and the 2004-06 X3 compact sport utility vehicle. The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration said in a posting on its website Wednesday that small cracks could develop in a seat detection mat and lead the front passenger air bags to be deactivated. It also would turn on the passenger air bag "on-off" light.
NEWS
April 7, 1994 | CHIP JOHNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Auto burglars from New York to Los Angeles have added an explosive new item to their list of things to steal--air bags. Insurance industry experts and police say the national outbreak is little more than a few months old, and although statistics are not yet available, there are plenty of word-of-mouth reports.
BUSINESS
April 2, 1990 | From Associated Press
The Supreme Court today let stand rulings that protect automobile manufacturers from design-defect lawsuits for not installing air bags. The justices, without comment, refused to revive three such suits against General Motors, one against Honda and one against Nissan. Three federal appeals courts and a California state court ruled in favor of the car makers.
BUSINESS
September 6, 2007 | From Reuters
The federal government effectively ordered auto manufacturers Wednesday to install advanced head and side air bags in new vehicles beginning in 2009 to provide more protection for drivers and passengers in side-impact crashes. The first-ever National Highway Traffic Safety Administration requirement aimed at reducing head injuries will force carmakers to meet aggressive criteria that could render unacceptable some side air bag systems that have been installed voluntarily in recent years.
BUSINESS
September 12, 2000 | Associated Press
General Motors Corp. has warned owners of 290,000 Buick and Oldsmobile sedans that driver-side air bags could deploy unexpectedly, but a recall cannot begin yet because GM does not have parts to fix the problem. A GM spokesman said 60 injuries, all minor, have been reported from 115 incidents of air bag deployment. The problem affects 103,000 1995 Buick Regals and 187,000 Oldsmobile Cutlass Supremes from 1995-96 sold in the United States and Canada.
NEWS
August 3, 2001 | From Associated Press
Many pickup truck drivers don't turn off the passenger-side air bag when carrying children, putting them at a greater risk of air bag-related injuries, according to a government study released Thursday. The government began allowing air bag switches in 1995 and recommends that the passenger-side air bag be turned off when a child younger than 13 is in the front seat.
NEWS
December 15, 1998 | From Associated Press
A man who failed to switch off an air bag that deployed in an accident and killed his infant son was sentenced Monday to two 12-hour days in jail--the boy's birthday and the crash anniversary. Dwight Childs, 29, is believed to be the first person sentenced for failing to switch off an air bag, according to the American Automobile Assn. "Anything I do won't matter," Municipal Court Judge Kenneth Spanagel told Childs, who hung his head and grimaced during his sentencing.
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