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August 2, 1989 | RALPH VARTABEDIAN, Times Staff Writer
As the sun rises over the Mojave Desert, unmarked trucks from clandestine warehouses begin to make the day's deliveries of secret aircraft parts to Northrop's B-2 bomber plant in Palmdale. The trucks pass through several barbed wire security fences and a perimeter that is guarded by attack dogs and cameras. When employees arrive for work, they must punch in a secret code to pass through special locked turnstiles.
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NATIONAL
November 26, 2008 | Julian E. Barnes, Barnes is a writer in our Washington bureau.
The U.S. government must take steps to modernize how it keeps track of its nuclear weapons to help prevent mistakes, Air Force Chief of Staff Norton A. Schwartz said Tuesday on a visit to part of his service's nuclear force. Schwartz visited Barksdale Air Force Base, one of the installations housing the nation's nuclear-capable B-52 bombers, in a trip designed to emphasize the importance of reforms in how weapons are handled.
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NEWS
November 17, 1989 | RALPH VARTABEDIAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Air Force is quietly seeking a legal way to move its Ballistic Systems Division out of San Bernardino, The Times has learned, even though Congress enacted a law earlier this year specifically saying that it should remain at its present location.
NATIONAL
September 26, 2008 | From the Associated Press
The Air Force and Army have disciplined 17 senior officers, including the three-star general in charge of logistics, for poor oversight in connection with the mistaken shipment to Taiwan of fuses for nuclear warheads. Saying he could not ignore the "breaches of trust that occurred on their watch," acting Air Force Secretary Michael B. Donley laid out Thursday what in some cases were career-ending punishments for six Air Force generals, ranging in rank from one to three stars, and nine colonels.
NEWS
February 14, 1987
The estranged husband of attorney Gloria Allred, his daughter and two other officers of his North Hollywood aircraft parts firm were ordered Friday by a federal magistrate to return to Texas to face an indictment charging them with selling counterfeit parts to the Air Force. U.S. Magistrate Ralph Geffen told the four to appear in U.S. District Court in San Antonio after attorneys for the defendants agreed to waive all proceedings here.
NEWS
August 19, 1996 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Air Force authorities launched an investigation Sunday into why a U.S. military cargo plane providing support for President Clinton slammed into a Wyoming mountainside, exploding into a fireball that could be seen for miles. The four-engine C-130 had been assigned to bring equipment from Jackson, Wyo., where the first family had been vacationing, to New York City for Clinton's 50th-birthday celebration.
NEWS
July 4, 1999 | RICHARD A. SERRANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On a Texas spring day during the height of the Vietnam War, a fresh-faced young man about to graduate from Yale University walked into the office of the commander of the Texas Air National Guard. Col. Walter B. "Buck" Staudt listened to the 21-year-old, who had no military or aviation experience but seemed polite and presentable. "He said he wanted to fly just like his daddy," Staudt recalled.
NATIONAL
March 30, 2008 | Julian E. Barnes and Peter Spiegel, Times Staff Writers
Troubling images flash across the screen, showing black-clad terrorists, tsunami-flooded villages and the Chinese army. "Only the United States Air Force has the speed, power and vision to defend our nation for the century ahead," the announcer intones as an F-22 fighter jet flies over a snowy mountaintop. "U.S. Air Force, above all." There is nothing unusual about seeing military recruiting ads right now.
NATIONAL
February 8, 2008 | Peter Spiegel, Times Staff Writer
The Air Force's top officer on Thursday presented a new strategic plan for the service that warns the U.S. cannot ignore "ascendant powers" seeking to challenge American military superiority as it fights low-intensity wars elsewhere. In his new plan, Gen. T. Michael Moseley, the Air Force chief of staff, did not name specific countries as potential challengers. But at a formal presentation, Moseley singled out military spending in Russia and China, noting both are rising at a rapid clip.
BUSINESS
September 20, 2008 | From the Associated Press
Lockheed Martin Corp. and the Air Force on Friday took the unusual step of publicly defending a $300-billion fighter jet program from recent criticisms of the plane's capabilities, including reports that it performed poorly in a simulated fight with a Russian aircraft. The Air Force and Bethesda, Md.
NATIONAL
July 30, 2008 | Julian E. Barnes, Times Staff Writer
The Bush administration's nominee to become the next head of the Air Force is facing trouble in the Senate and will undergo an unusual second round of closed-door questioning today. Air Force Gen. Norton A. Schwartz is being called before the Senate Armed Services Committee for a second classified session focused on testimony he gave after the initial invasion of Iraq, said military and congressional staff members. Defense Secretary Robert M. Gates and Navy Adm. Michael G.
NATIONAL
July 23, 2008 | Julian E. Barnes, Times Staff Writer
Two defense officials nominated to take control of the Air Force promised Tuesday to work to restore trust after the reputation of the service was battered by accusations that it failed to properly oversee the nation's nuclear weapons and was insufficiently committed to the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. Michael B. Donley, who previously served as a Pentagon administrator, and Gen. Norton A. Schwartz, head of Transportation Command, were nominated to replace Air Force Secretary Michael W.
BUSINESS
July 10, 2008 | Peter Spiegel, Times Staff Writer
The chronically troubled effort to build a new fleet of aerial refueling tankers for the Air Force was delayed yet again after Defense Secretary Robert M. Gates announced Wednesday that the competition that selected Northrop Grumman Corp. was flawed and would be opened for the third time in seven years. The decision is a blow to the Century City-based aerospace giant, which was the surprise winner of the $35-billion contract over archrival Boeing Co. in February.
BUSINESS
June 26, 2008 | From the Associated Press
Defense Secretary Robert M. Gates pledged to oversee a disputed $35-billion tanker contract after congressional investigators Wednesday detailed numerous mistakes the Air Force made in awarding the deal to Northrop Grumman Corp. and its European partner over Boeing Co.
NATIONAL
March 30, 2008 | Julian E. Barnes and Peter Spiegel, Times Staff Writers
Troubling images flash across the screen, showing black-clad terrorists, tsunami-flooded villages and the Chinese army. "Only the United States Air Force has the speed, power and vision to defend our nation for the century ahead," the announcer intones as an F-22 fighter jet flies over a snowy mountaintop. "U.S. Air Force, above all." There is nothing unusual about seeing military recruiting ads right now.
NEWS
March 24, 1994 | ART PINE and ERIC HARRISON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Sixteen people were killed and 82 injured Wednesday when an Air Force fighter jet collided with a military cargo plane above Pope Air Force Base here and debris from the wreckage careened into a transport plane on the ground. Air Force officials said the two pilots aboard the F-16D fighter jet ejected safely, and the C-130 cargo plane was able to land safely with five crew members aboard.
BUSINESS
October 27, 1988 | RALPH VARTABEDIAN, Times Staff Writer
After a difficult and costly development effort that thrust the company into controversy, Hughes Aircraft unveiled Wednesday the first production model of its advanced medium-range, air-to-air missile. The missile, known as AMRAAM, is the first of 24,000 that will be built by Hughes and its competitor, Raytheon, by the year 2000 at a total cost of $7.58 billion. Foreign sales and licensing agreements will bring the companies additional business.
BUSINESS
March 10, 2008 | Peter Pae, Times Staff Writer
In a high-stakes rivalry pitting two of the world's largest defense contractors, Century City-based Northrop Grumman Corp. gambled and won. The word came down Feb. 29 from the Air Force that a $40-billion contract for aerial refueling tankers would go to Northrop and its partner, Airbus, a unit of Netherlands-based European Aeronautic Defense & Space Co. Shut out was rival Boeing Co., which thought it had a winner.
BUSINESS
March 8, 2008 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Boeing Co. said Friday that it would seriously consider challenging a U.S. Air Force decision to give a $40-billion aerial tanker program to a team that includes its European archrival Airbus. After receiving an Air Force briefing on the victory of Century City-based Northrop Grumman Corp.
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