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Air Pollution Brazil

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NEWS
July 13, 1988
Pollution is so bad in the Brazilian city of Sao Paulo that authorities plan to stop 2 million cars from entering the downtown area today. Under an anti-pollution plan announced last week, 500 police and employees of the government's environmental protection agency are scheduled to block off the city's 200-square-block central district before the morning rush hour, permitting only buses and official vehicles to enter the area until 9 p.m.
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NEWS
November 8, 1988 | WILLIAM R. LONG, Times Staff Writer
The Volkswagens, Chevrolets and Fords that roll out of automobile factories here are uniquely Brazilian: About 90% of cars produced for use in Brazil run on 185-proof alcohol instead of gasoline. Alcohol engines may be a little harder to start on a cold morning than gasoline engines. But the smog, which takes on a faintly sweet odor from the alcohol exhaust fumes, is less toxic.
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NEWS
November 8, 1988 | WILLIAM R. LONG, Times Staff Writer
The Volkswagens, Chevrolets and Fords that roll out of automobile factories here are uniquely Brazilian: About 90% of cars produced for use in Brazil run on 185-proof alcohol instead of gasoline. Alcohol engines may be a little harder to start on a cold morning than gasoline engines. But the smog, which takes on a faintly sweet odor from the alcohol exhaust fumes, is less toxic.
NEWS
July 13, 1988
Pollution is so bad in the Brazilian city of Sao Paulo that authorities plan to stop 2 million cars from entering the downtown area today. Under an anti-pollution plan announced last week, 500 police and employees of the government's environmental protection agency are scheduled to block off the city's 200-square-block central district before the morning rush hour, permitting only buses and official vehicles to enter the area until 9 p.m.
NEWS
June 17, 1989 | WILLIAM R. LONG, Times Staff Writer
Brazil is taking measures to curtail the growth of its pioneering alcohol fuel program, which has saved gasoline and reduced pollution but has caused economic distortions and cost the nation billions of dollars. The government has whittled away price incentives for using pure alcohol fuel, diminished the amount of alcohol added to gasoline, and told auto manufacturers to begin producing fewer alcohol-powered cars. As Brazil retrenches, the Bush Administration is pushing for increased use of alcohol fuel.
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