Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsAir Pollution California
IN THE NEWS

Air Pollution California

NEWS
February 12, 1987 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, Times Science Writer
Breathing fog in California's San Joaquin Valley may be more dangerous than inhaling polluted air because particles of pesticides, chemicals and vehicle exhaust fumes accumulate in much higher concentrations in fog, scientists reported today. "There is a difference between inhaling vapors (in air) and inhaling concentrated particles (in fog). The particles stay in the lungs, whereas vapors can be exhaled," said James N.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
July 17, 1990 | PATRICK LEE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The oil company that gave the world the Exxon Valdez oil spill hopes to score some environmental points with consumers by introducing lower-emissions gasolines in California today, joining three other refiners already selling such fuel here. Exxon Corp., the West Coast's fifth-largest retailer of gasoline last year, is expected to unveil a reformulation of its Exxon Extra premium unleaded gasoline at about 175 stations in the Los Angeles area.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 17, 1990 | MARLA CONE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
California residents will be protected from highly toxic dioxins emitted into their neighborhoods under a new state rule that will force more than 100 hospital incinerators to shut down within a year, air quality officials said Monday. The hospitals and health-care centers, which use the incinerators to burn infectious medical waste along with regular garbage, must cut dioxin fumes by 99% under a regulation adopted Friday by the California Air Resources Board.
NEWS
August 25, 1987 | NANCY RIVERA BROOKS, Times Staff Writer
Weekend painters around the state may find it more difficult and expensive to touch up their house trim, varnish their decks or stain their wood floors beginning Sept. 1 because of new regulations designed to reduce air pollution. The new rules, which mandate lower levels of solvents in certain oil-base paints and other coatings, have left many paint manufacturers, retailers and contractors confused and angry.
NEWS
August 3, 1999 | From Associated Press
The California Air Resources Board may consider lowering the amount of sulfur allowed in the state's gasoline so autos can more effectively cut smog-producing emissions. The board's staff has drafted a preliminary proposal to lower the amount of sulfur allowed in gas from a maximum of 80 parts per million for any single batch to a maximum of 20 ppm to 30 ppm, according to documents released Monday.
NEWS
August 5, 2000 | NANCY VOGEL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
California's already severe electricity squeeze could tighten further this summer if regulators don't ease up on air pollution rules, power company officials said Friday. The state's 1,000 power plants--many aging and burning natural gas--have been running so hard and long in this summer of electricity scarcity that many are close to spewing as much pollution as they are allowed for the year under their permits.
NEWS
December 22, 2000 | GARY POLAKOVIC, TIMES ENVIRONMENTAL WRITER
California's power plants are spewing large quantities of extra air pollution during the state's energy crunch--setting the stage for a high-stakes conflict between power producers and air quality regulators as the energy shortage continues. Earlier this month, regulators received a taste of problems to come when energy company AES Pacific Inc.
NEWS
August 10, 1995 | MARLA CONE, TIMES ENVIRONMENTAL WRITER
Air quality officials have proposed changes in California's controversial mandate for pollution-free cars to help bridge the gap between today's gasoline-powered cars and emerging electric vehicles. The proposal, discussed at an air agency meeting Wednesday, would modify the mandate to allow hybrid cars--those that run on both electricity and a small gasoline-powered engine. Such cars would qualify for partial credit toward meeting the zero emission requirements.
NEWS
December 22, 1995 | MARLA CONE, TIMES ENVIRONMENTAL WRITER
Dramatically scaling back its pioneering mandate for mass-produced electric cars, the Wilson administration's air quality board Thursday signaled its intent to suspend its requirement for exhaust-free cars until 2003. In a move with far-reaching consequences, the California Air Resources Board revealed its plans to substantially ease the mandate. The decision came after nine months of intense lobbying and rampant speculation that the board was bowing to pressure from the auto and oil industries.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|