Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsAir Pollution California
IN THE NEWS

Air Pollution California

NEWS
October 30, 1999 | MARLA CONE, TIMES ENVIRONMENTAL WRITER
Cars and trucks are responsible for a much larger share of California's smog than previously documented--a revelation that may force air quality officials to redouble their efforts to clean up vehicle emissions, according to new data released Friday. The tonnage of smog-forming gases that waft from vehicles in the Los Angeles Basin is two to three times greater than the California Air Resources Board had been estimating, according to a new emissions inventory developed by the state agency.
Advertisement
NEWS
October 29, 1999 | MARLA CONE, TIMES ENVIRONMENTAL WRITER
In its long-running battle against smog, the state Air Resources Board on Thursday voted to require manufacturers of a lengthy list of consumer products--from hair mousse to air freshener--to reduce the amount of fumes that waft into California's air. The regulation, adopted unanimously, is the sixth sweeping set of pollution standards over the past 10 years that target items found in most Californians' kitchens, garages and bathrooms.
NEWS
September 23, 1999 | MARLA CONE, TIMES ENVIRONMENTAL WRITER
Every day, Californians allow huge volumes of gasoline fumes to seep into the air, causing smoggy skies. But it's not just from cars. Or boats. Or even lawn mowers. It's also from gas cans. The small, portable containers are so leak-prone and ubiquitous--Californians own an estimated 10 million of them--that they account for as much smog-forming pollutants as 1 million cars, according to state air experts.
NEWS
August 3, 1999 | From Associated Press
The California Air Resources Board may consider lowering the amount of sulfur allowed in the state's gasoline so autos can more effectively cut smog-producing emissions. The board's staff has drafted a preliminary proposal to lower the amount of sulfur allowed in gas from a maximum of 80 parts per million for any single batch to a maximum of 20 ppm to 30 ppm, according to documents released Monday.
BUSINESS
February 18, 1999 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Following California's lead, the Environmental Protection Agency will propose a set of tough rules that would require light trucks and sport-utility vehicles for the first time to meet the same stringent emission standards as cars, according to the Washington Post. The proposed rules also would require oil companies to produce cleaner gasoline. Both changes would take effect starting in 2004. The California Air Resources Board adopted similar measures in November, with the same effective date.
NEWS
December 11, 1998 | MARLA CONE, TIMES ENVIRONMENTAL WRITER
New boats and personal watercraft--some of the dirtiest machines made today--will no longer spew large volumes of unburned fuel into California's air and water under stringent new pollution limits adopted Thursday. Manufacturers waged a vigorous fight against the new emission standards, predicting that consumers won't be able to afford new motorboats, and that California's boating and recreation industries could be decimated.
NEWS
November 20, 1998 | MARLA CONE, TIMES ENVIRONMENTAL WRITER
Spray paints got a reprieve Thursday from stringent anti-smog limits as the California Air Resources Board rolled back standards that were supposed to go into effect in a year. If the limits set in 1995 were enforced, most popular aerosol paint products would have to be taken off store shelves because no company has found a way to comply, air board officials said.
NEWS
November 17, 1998 | MARLA CONE, TIMES ENVIRONMENTAL WRITER
MTBE, the controversial gasoline additive that has contaminated ground water throughout the state, does little if anything to clean the air and should be phased out within six years, University of California researchers have concluded. The study, commissioned 10 months ago by the Legislature and governor's office, was designed to help California officials decide whether to ban the oxygenate, which refineries add to fuel to boost octane and decrease carbon monoxide emissions.
NEWS
October 9, 1998 | CARL INGRAM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The scenario is familiar: You are stuck in traffic and just ahead is an old diesel truck belching noxious clouds of exhaust with seeming impunity. You inhale the fumes, curse and wonder, yet again, how such obvious polluters of the air can get away with it. Californians like you are exactly who the drafters of Proposition 7 had in mind when they wrote the Air Quality Improvement Act and put it on the Nov. 3 ballot. The measure would award about $2.
NEWS
September 2, 1998 | VIRGINIA ELLIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After months of delays, a tough new Smog Check program expected to significantly increase the number of cars that fail pollution tests will begin next Wednesday, state officials said Tuesday. The program, which had become so controversial that only a last-minute political maneuver saved it from legislative annihilation, will be phased in gradually, officials said. Failure rates in the initial months will increase only modestly, to about 11%, from 9%, they said.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|