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Air Pollution California

NEWS
April 23, 1998 | MARLA CONE, TIMES ENVIRONMENTAL WRITER
Capping nearly a decade of debate, a state panel of scientists Wednesday decided that diesel exhaust poses a serious cancer danger and urged state environmental officials to take steps to protect public health. The implications of the long-awaited decision are great, not only in terms of people's health, but also the economy.
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NEWS
August 28, 1997 | FRANK CLIFFORD, TIMES ENVIRONMENTAL WRITER
Casting a new cloud over the future of a controversial air quality strategy developed in Southern California, the state Air Resources Board has decided to suspend the approval process for all pollution trading initiatives pending before it. In a letter to air pollution control officials throughout California, the board said it was taking the action in the wake of legal challenges to pollution trading credits granted to several Los Angeles area oil companies.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 2, 1997 | MARLA CONE, TIMES ENVIRONMENTAL WRITER
Air pollution agencies in California, including the Los Angeles area, are failing to adequately penalize businesses that violate smog rules and pose a public health threat or nuisance, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency says in a audit. The probe concludes that fines are too low, especially for repeat offenders, to ensure that companies are taking air quality violations seriously.
NEWS
July 25, 1997 | MARLA CONE, TIMES ENVIRONMENTAL WRITER
Smog-causing fumes from car waxes, carpet cleaners and a wide variety of other popular household products will be cut in half in California under a consumer products regulation unanimously adopted Thursday by the state's air board.
NEWS
May 10, 1997 | MARLA CONE, TIMES ENVIRONMENTAL WRITER
In a surprise move, half of the Southland's air quality board on Friday mounted an effort to oust the agency's top-ranking executives, including Executive Officer James M. Lents, who has served as the region's top smog-fighter for more than 10 years. After a fiery debate, the South Coast Air Quality Management District board deadlocked 6 to 6 in each of several votes to decide whether to renew the executives' contracts.
NEWS
March 14, 1997 | MARLA CONE, TIMES ENVIRONMENTAL WRITER
Gathered before a diverse group of Silicon Valley business leaders, Carol Browner had just described her agency's fiercely fought plan to set tough new limits on air pollution. Finished with her appeal, she stepped back, bracing for the questions. After all, as head of the U.S.
NEWS
November 13, 1996 | CARL INGRAM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
High-level Wilson administration officials acknowledged Tuesday that the new Smog Check II vehicle inspection program is plagued by start-up problems, but promised solutions before the program is fully implemented next year. "Together we can constructively discuss what's broken, fix the problem and improve the program," Undersecretary Anne E. Sheehan of the State and Consumer Services Agency told a legislative fact-finding hearing.
NEWS
September 24, 1996 | CARL INGRAM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Senate President Pro Tem Bill Lockyer joined 62 other state legislators Monday in urging Gov. Pete Wilson to suspend the new Smog Check II program just as it gets underway. The Hayward Democrat charged that implementation of the program, aimed at cleaning up the dirtiest cars in the smoggiest regions of California, has "resulted in confusion and anger on the part of car owners and mechanics alike."
NEWS
September 3, 1996 | MARLA CONE, TIMES ENVIRONMENTAL WRITER
Nabbed by smog-busters and labeled "gross polluters," many California motorists are rebelling against the expense and inconvenience of the state's newly revamped Smog Check program. Kyoko Pleet, for one, feels she's paid her fair share--in time and money--to help clean Southern California's dirty air. After spending $500 to repair her 1987 Nissan Sentra's faulty carburetor, Pleet repeatedly called the jammed Smog Check phone lines to book an appointment at a newly created referee station.
NEWS
June 27, 1996 | FRANK CLIFFORD, TIMES ENVIRONMENTAL WRITER
Reducing toxic emissions by more than 60% over the last eight years, California is one of five states leading a downward trend in the amount of pollution released by factories, refineries and chemical plants into the country's air, water and land. According to figures released Wednesday by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, the level of toxic chemicals released into the nation's environment declined by 44% for the same period.
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