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Air Pollution California

BUSINESS
February 18, 1999 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Following California's lead, the Environmental Protection Agency will propose a set of tough rules that would require light trucks and sport-utility vehicles for the first time to meet the same stringent emission standards as cars, according to the Washington Post. The proposed rules also would require oil companies to produce cleaner gasoline. Both changes would take effect starting in 2004. The California Air Resources Board adopted similar measures in November, with the same effective date.
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NEWS
December 11, 1998 | MARLA CONE, TIMES ENVIRONMENTAL WRITER
New boats and personal watercraft--some of the dirtiest machines made today--will no longer spew large volumes of unburned fuel into California's air and water under stringent new pollution limits adopted Thursday. Manufacturers waged a vigorous fight against the new emission standards, predicting that consumers won't be able to afford new motorboats, and that California's boating and recreation industries could be decimated.
NEWS
November 20, 1998 | MARLA CONE, TIMES ENVIRONMENTAL WRITER
Spray paints got a reprieve Thursday from stringent anti-smog limits as the California Air Resources Board rolled back standards that were supposed to go into effect in a year. If the limits set in 1995 were enforced, most popular aerosol paint products would have to be taken off store shelves because no company has found a way to comply, air board officials said.
NEWS
September 2, 1998 | VIRGINIA ELLIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After months of delays, a tough new Smog Check program expected to significantly increase the number of cars that fail pollution tests will begin next Wednesday, state officials said Tuesday. The program, which had become so controversial that only a last-minute political maneuver saved it from legislative annihilation, will be phased in gradually, officials said. Failure rates in the initial months will increase only modestly, to about 11%, from 9%, they said.
NEWS
August 28, 1998 | MARLA CONE, TIMES ENVIRONMENTAL WRITER
Diesel soot--the culprit behind the smoke from trucks and buses that annoys many Californians--is a toxic, cancer-causing danger to the public, the state's air quality board declared in a unanimous vote Thursday. The decision, which set in place an unusual compromise between industry and environmentalists, ended nearly 10 years of political debate and scientific analysis by state officials and a panel of scientists. Now, the real work begins for the state Air Resources Board.
NEWS
August 27, 1998 | MARLA CONE, TIMES ENVIRONMENTAL WRITER
Ending a bitter fight over diesel exhaust, the California Air Resources Board today is expected to declare diesel soot a cancer-causing pollutant after industry leaders and environmentalists struck a deal that quells nearly a decade of intense opposition. The agreement is an unusual compromise in a war of words that has endured for nine years--the time that state environmental officials have spent reviewing the dangers that trucks, buses and other diesel engines pose to public health.
NEWS
August 25, 1998 | VIRGINIA ELLIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Southern California motorists have been paying extra fees for an enhanced smog check program that exists mostly on paper and has yet to do anything to scrub the brown haze from the air. Smog Check II was designed to clean up oxides of nitrogen, the chemical from car emissions that turns smog brown, burns the lungs and obscures the peaks of the San Gabriel Mountains even on some sunny days.
NEWS
August 9, 1998 | AMY PYLE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On days thick with factory fumes, Martha Escutia fielded desperate telephone calls from parents in her Assembly district about children with nosebleeds, children lethargic, children dizzy and nauseated. Then she read a federal report urging local officials to protect the nation's future by minimizing environmental health threats to children. For Escutia, a Democratic assemblywoman and new mother herself, the two pleas fused into a powerful resolve.
NEWS
July 18, 1998 | MARLA CONE, TIMES ENVIRONMENTAL WRITER
In 1965, a brand new Chevy Malibu, straight off the factory floor, spewed over half a ton of smog-forming exhaust into the air by the time it was driven 100,000 miles. Today, that same car model is so advanced that it puts out only about 100 pounds of pollution in its lifetime. But as clean as modern automobiles are, California officials have not yet ended their push to make them cleaner.
NEWS
April 29, 1998 | MARLA CONE, TIMES ENVIRONMENTAL WRITER
Claiming that people living near supermarket distribution centers face an excessive cancer danger from breathing diesel truck fumes, California Atty. Gen. Dan Lungren and environmental groups sued four of the state's largest grocery chains Tuesday. The lawsuits target a Vons distribution center in Santa Fe Springs, a Ralphs facility in Los Angeles, Lucky Stores operations in Buena Park and San Leandro, and a Stater Bros. center in Colton.
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