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Air Pollution California

NEWS
August 27, 1998 | MARLA CONE, TIMES ENVIRONMENTAL WRITER
Ending a bitter fight over diesel exhaust, the California Air Resources Board today is expected to declare diesel soot a cancer-causing pollutant after industry leaders and environmentalists struck a deal that quells nearly a decade of intense opposition. The agreement is an unusual compromise in a war of words that has endured for nine years--the time that state environmental officials have spent reviewing the dangers that trucks, buses and other diesel engines pose to public health.
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NEWS
August 25, 1998 | VIRGINIA ELLIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Southern California motorists have been paying extra fees for an enhanced smog check program that exists mostly on paper and has yet to do anything to scrub the brown haze from the air. Smog Check II was designed to clean up oxides of nitrogen, the chemical from car emissions that turns smog brown, burns the lungs and obscures the peaks of the San Gabriel Mountains even on some sunny days.
NEWS
August 9, 1998 | AMY PYLE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On days thick with factory fumes, Martha Escutia fielded desperate telephone calls from parents in her Assembly district about children with nosebleeds, children lethargic, children dizzy and nauseated. Then she read a federal report urging local officials to protect the nation's future by minimizing environmental health threats to children. For Escutia, a Democratic assemblywoman and new mother herself, the two pleas fused into a powerful resolve.
NEWS
July 18, 1998 | MARLA CONE, TIMES ENVIRONMENTAL WRITER
In 1965, a brand new Chevy Malibu, straight off the factory floor, spewed over half a ton of smog-forming exhaust into the air by the time it was driven 100,000 miles. Today, that same car model is so advanced that it puts out only about 100 pounds of pollution in its lifetime. But as clean as modern automobiles are, California officials have not yet ended their push to make them cleaner.
NEWS
April 29, 1998 | MARLA CONE, TIMES ENVIRONMENTAL WRITER
Claiming that people living near supermarket distribution centers face an excessive cancer danger from breathing diesel truck fumes, California Atty. Gen. Dan Lungren and environmental groups sued four of the state's largest grocery chains Tuesday. The lawsuits target a Vons distribution center in Santa Fe Springs, a Ralphs facility in Los Angeles, Lucky Stores operations in Buena Park and San Leandro, and a Stater Bros. center in Colton.
NEWS
April 23, 1998 | MARLA CONE, TIMES ENVIRONMENTAL WRITER
Capping nearly a decade of debate, a state panel of scientists Wednesday decided that diesel exhaust poses a serious cancer danger and urged state environmental officials to take steps to protect public health. The implications of the long-awaited decision are great, not only in terms of people's health, but also the economy.
NEWS
August 28, 1997 | FRANK CLIFFORD, TIMES ENVIRONMENTAL WRITER
Casting a new cloud over the future of a controversial air quality strategy developed in Southern California, the state Air Resources Board has decided to suspend the approval process for all pollution trading initiatives pending before it. In a letter to air pollution control officials throughout California, the board said it was taking the action in the wake of legal challenges to pollution trading credits granted to several Los Angeles area oil companies.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 2, 1997 | MARLA CONE, TIMES ENVIRONMENTAL WRITER
Air pollution agencies in California, including the Los Angeles area, are failing to adequately penalize businesses that violate smog rules and pose a public health threat or nuisance, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency says in a audit. The probe concludes that fines are too low, especially for repeat offenders, to ensure that companies are taking air quality violations seriously.
NEWS
July 25, 1997 | MARLA CONE, TIMES ENVIRONMENTAL WRITER
Smog-causing fumes from car waxes, carpet cleaners and a wide variety of other popular household products will be cut in half in California under a consumer products regulation unanimously adopted Thursday by the state's air board.
NEWS
May 10, 1997 | MARLA CONE, TIMES ENVIRONMENTAL WRITER
In a surprise move, half of the Southland's air quality board on Friday mounted an effort to oust the agency's top-ranking executives, including Executive Officer James M. Lents, who has served as the region's top smog-fighter for more than 10 years. After a fiery debate, the South Coast Air Quality Management District board deadlocked 6 to 6 in each of several votes to decide whether to renew the executives' contracts.
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