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Air Resources Board

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 13, 2008 | Margot Roosevelt, Roosevelt is a Times staff writer.
Mary Nichols, the savvy negotiator who is leading California's complex effort to reduce its greenhouse gas emissions, is reportedly a candidate to head President-elect Barack Obama's Environmental Protection Agency. Nichols, 63, is chairwoman of the state's powerful Air Resources Board. She was a high-level EPA official under President Clinton, serving as the agency's assistant administrator for air and radiation. Appointed to head the state air board by Gov.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 18, 2008 | Margot Roosevelt, Times Staff Writer
Few dispute that reducing planet-heating greenhouse gas emissions is a good idea. But fewer still know how much it will cost. Wednesday, California officials served up their official economic analysis of the state's ambitious global warming plan: By 2020, it would boost the state's expected $2.6-trillion gross product by $4 billion, create 100,000 additional jobs and increase per capita income by $200, the state Air Resources Board concluded after months of complex modeling.
BUSINESS
March 28, 2008 | Ken Bensinger, Times Staff Writer
California's Air Resources Board voted Thursday to slash by 70% the number of emission-free vehicles that carmakers must sell in the state in coming years, a significant blow for environmentalists and transportation activists. But the panel set new rules requiring automakers to build tens of thousands of plug-in hybrid cars, which run on electricity and gasoline.
OPINION
March 18, 2008
Re "Deregulation deja vu," editorial, March 10 Your editorial about the California Public Utilities Commission's recommendations to reduce greenhouse gas emissions overlooks several issues. Assembly Bill 32 requires the Air Resources Board to address emissions from power plants in California and from the 20% to 25% of imported energy, which produces more than 50% of emissions. The first-deliverer approach makes sense because it places the regulatory obligation close to the source.
BUSINESS
January 11, 2008 | Ken Bensinger, Times Staff Writer
A coalition of automobile trade groups has sued the California Air Resources Board over a new regulation that extends warranties on some vehicle emissions equipment, claiming it could cost its members billions of dollars. The suit was filed last week in Los Angeles Superior Court by 11 organizations that represent the aftermarket car parts and service industry. At issue is a rule, approved Jan.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 28, 2007 | Janet Wilson, Times Staff Writer
The California Air Resources Board on Thursday banned popular in-home ozone air purifiers, saying studies have found that they can worsen conditions such as asthma that marketers claim they help to prevent. The regulation, which the board said is the first of its kind in the nation, will require testing and certification of all types of air purifiers. Any that emit more than a tiny amount of ozone will have to be pulled from the California market.
OPINION
September 5, 2007 | Richard Nemec, Richard Nemec is a Los Angeles writer who covers energy issues, including global warming, for a number of national trade publications. E-mail:
At the risk of oversimplifying, it is safe to say environmentalists always argue for higher standards. They are inherently positioned to oppose much of what goes on in the private sector. They assume that even the so-called clean companies have some environmental skeletons in their closets.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 7, 2007 | Evan Halper, Times Staff Writer
Democratic lawmakers charged the Schwarzenegger administration Friday with bullying the state's air board into softening enforcement of environmental laws, as two former top regulators testified that the governor's chief deputies routinely pressured them not to push ahead with policies that industry found objectionable.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 3, 2007 | Janet Wilson, Times Staff Writer
Saying that the Schwarzenegger administration "has lost its way on air quality," a top California air official resigned Monday. Catherine Witherspoon, executive director of the California Air Resources Board, resigned less than a week after Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger fired the board's chairman, Robert Sawyer, who said he was dismissed for aggressively pursuing greenhouse gas emission reductions.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 29, 2007 | Janet Wilson, Times Staff Writer
The chairman of the California Air Resources Board, Robert F. Sawyer, was fired by Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger this week amid mounting criticism of the agency's leadership on global warming and air pollution policies. Sawyer and the governor's office gave sharply differing accounts of why he was let go after 18 months at the helm of what has long been described as the world's most influential air pollution regulatory agency. "I was fired, I did not resign....
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