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Air Resources Board

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 29, 2005 | Jordan Rau and Miguel Bustillo, Times Staff Writers
Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger, who enthused activists and unnerved business leaders with many of his early appointments to top environmental slots, is increasingly favoring industry officials for key jobs protecting California's forests, air and water. Schwarzenegger's effort to be a green Republican has been one of the principal ways the governor has depicted himself as being above Sacramento's traditional partisan divides.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 29, 2005 | Miguel Bustillo, Times Staff Writer
Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger on Tuesday named a personable energy industry lobbyist who has fought against many of the state's toughest air pollution regulations to head California's powerful air quality agency. Cindy Tuck, whose efforts on behalf of oil refineries and power plants include opposing a landmark law to combat global warming that the governor champions, was named chairwoman of the Air Resources Board.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 17, 2004 | Marla Cone, Times Staff Writer
Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger on Thursday appointed a longtime air pollution scientist and policymaker to head the state's Environmental Protection Agency. Alan C. Lloyd, the chairman of the California Air Resources Board since 1999, will take over as secretary of the California EPA, replacing Terry Tamminen, who was named Cabinet secretary last month. Lloyd, who is a Democrat, has been an outspoken advocate of cleaning up California's air pollution since the late 1980s.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 19, 2004 | Miguel Bustillo, Times Staff Writer
Many ships, boats and locomotives, which are among the least regulated sources of air pollution in California, soon will be required to use low-polluting fuel under a regulation approved Thursday by the California Air Resources Board. The rule will require such commercial ships as fishing vessels, as well as recreational boats and short-haul train engines, to begin using a more expensive low-sulfur diesel fuel. The state already requires the fuel for large trucks and other commercial vehicles.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 29, 2003 | Gary Polakovic, Times Staff Writer
California air quality officials put off a vote on the state's hotly contested zero-emissions vehicle mandate, but strongly indicated last week that they don't intend to scrap the measure, which would require automakers to produce smog-free cars. The mandate was adopted 13 years ago, but last year the staff of the state Air Resources Board recommended freeing car makers from long-term commitments.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 1, 2003 | John O'Dell, Times Staff Writer
State Air Resources Board officials will call for scaling back a mandate requiring automakers to sell tens of thousands of zero-emission vehicles in California, and instead will allow manufacturers to get credit for making low-polluting hybrid vehicles, according to people familiar with the proposal. General Motors Corp. has challenged the current mandate in court, delaying its implementation.
OPINION
July 25, 2002
If the state Air Resources Board and the nation's auto makers do their jobs right, the cars and sport-utility vehicles that Americans drive 10 years from now will be better, smarter, safer and more fuel-efficient than today's models. They will not be much more expensive. And they will make a significant contribution to the nascent battle against global warming.
OPINION
July 3, 2002
The good guys won Monday, beating a slash-and-burn campaign by the auto industry in one of the Legislature's more titanic recent struggles. The Assembly, after a long and bitter debate, passed a landmark bill to fight global warming by limiting greenhouse gas emissions from autos, light trucks and sport utility vehicles. The bill's modest goals survived an all-out misinformation campaign by auto makers, dealers and labor unions.
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