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Air Traffic Control

BUSINESS
April 19, 2013 | By Hugo Martín, Los Angeles Times
Pilots and a top airline group have filed a lawsuit to stop the federal government from cutting work hours for air traffic controllers this weekend, saying the furloughs will lead to travel delays of up to an hour across the country. Airlines for America, a trade group for the nation's airlines, on Friday joined a pilots association and operators of regional carriers in a suit that asks the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit to prevent job furloughs called for under the so-called budget sequestration.
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BUSINESS
April 19, 2013 | By Hugo Martin
Expect delays in air travel of up to an hour starting this weekend because of federal budget cuts that are forcing the furlough of air traffic controllers, federal officials warn. The budget cuts, brought about by the so-called sequestration, will force the federal government to furlough air traffic controllers for about one day per two-week pay period. At Los Angeles International Airport, the nation's third-busiest airport, delays will average about 10 minutes but could extend up to 67 minutes, according to the Federal Aviation Administration.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 5, 2013 | By Laura J. Nelson
The 149 air-traffic control towers scheduled to be shut down Sunday due to federal budget cuts will be kept open for two more months, the Federal Aviation Administration announced Friday. The extension, through June 15, gives officials two months to deal with lawsuits regarding the closure, according to a statement issued by the agency. The FAA will also review "appropriate risk mitigations" and consult with airports and operators. The FAA had announced in March that they would close as many as 238 towers as part of mandatory federal budget cuts.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 22, 2013 | By Laura J. Nelson
The Federal Aviation Administration is expected to decide Friday whether to shut down 14 air traffic control towers in Southern California as part of the agency's efforts to trim $600 million because of the federal government's so-called sequestration. As many as 238 towers could be closed nationwide, with 23 in California. The Southland could lose towers at airports in Palmdale, Pacoima, Victorville, Oxnard, Fullerton, Lancaster and elsewhere that handle civil, commercial and military flights.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 22, 2013 | By Laura J. Nelson, Los Angeles Times
Seven air-traffic control towers in Southern California will close next month as a result of forced federal budget cuts, the Federal Aviation Administration announced Friday. The FAA had considered closing as many as 189 towers at smaller airports across the nation, including 14 in Southern California. The agency must cut $637 million from its budget by Sept. 30 as part of $85 billion in so-called sequestration cuts across the federal government. Southern California will lose towers in Fullerton, Oxnard, Riverside, San Diego, Victorville, Pacoima and Lancaster.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 22, 2013 | By Laura J. Nelson
Seven air-traffic control towers in Southern California will close next month as a result of forced federal budget cuts, the Federal Aviation Administration announced Friday. The FAA had been considering closing as many as 189 air-traffic control towers at smaller airports across the nation, including 14 in Southern California . The FAA must cut $637 million by Sept. 30 as part of $85 billion in cuts across the federal government. Southern California will lose towers in Fullerton, Oxnard, Riverside, San Diego, Victorville, Pacoima and Lancaster.
BUSINESS
March 11, 2013 | By Ricardo Lopez
Twenty-three air traffic control towers in California are among more than 200 nationwide scheduled to close April 7 as the Federal Aviation Administration begins imposing $600 million in federal budget cuts. It was unknown which traffic control towers would be affected when the automatic federal budget cuts in the so-called sequestration kicked in March 1, but the FAA last week released a list of airports, mainly small and medium-sized, that will be affected. They include airports in Riverside, Fullerton and El Monte.
NATIONAL
March 29, 2012 | By Tina Susman, Los Angeles Times
NEW YORK - Minutes after a JetBlue flight took off from New York for Las Vegas, the pilot began muttering things that didn't make sense to his co-pilot. He started talking about the need to "focus," lamented that "things just don't matter," and yelled at air traffic controllers to keep quiet. At some point, Capt. Clayton Osbon purportedly told his first officer that "we're not going to Las Vegas" and launched into a sermon. That set off a chain of events that culminated in a federal charge of interfering with a flight crew being filed against Osbon on Wednesday, a day after he was tackled by passengers at 35,000 feet and later carried off to a hospital.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 20, 2011 | By Elaine Woo, Los Angeles Times
J. Lynn Helms, the head of the Federal Aviation Administration who carried out President Reagan's order to fire more than 11,000 striking air traffic controllers and oversaw efforts to keep airlines flying during the crisis, has died. He was 86. He died Dec. 11 of cardiopulmonary failure at his home in Westport, Conn., a family spokesman said. Helms had a reputation as a decisive, technically brilliant aviation industry executive who led a number of companies out of financial straits, including Piper Aircraft, which he ran for six years.
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