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NEWS
October 24, 1992 | From Associated Press
Scientists say that further tests will be needed to determine if air samples taken Friday from a 17th-Century sealed lead coffin are pre-Industrial Revolution quality. The seal of the coffin found buried under the site of Colonial America's first Roman Catholic chapel appeared to be intact, but preliminary tests of the air were inconclusive, said Benjamin C. Bradlee, the former Washington Post editor who is chairman of the Historic St. Mary's City Commission.
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NATIONAL
March 3, 2009 | TIMES WIRE REPORTS
The Environmental Protection Agency will soon begin testing the air around schools for toxic contaminants. The $2.25-million program will be the first of its kind. Monitors will focus on chemicals known to cause cancer and respiratory and neurological problems. States and local governments will monitor the air at 50 to 100 schools near industrial facilities or in cities with high concentrations of pollution.
BUSINESS
May 13, 2010 | By Joe Flint, Los Angeles Times
Over the last 15 months, Sony Television President Steve Mosko has traveled to Russia, Tokyo, London, Holland and twice to India. He wasn't impersonating Ryan Bingham, the itinerant corporate hatchet man played by George Clooney in "Up in the Air." Mosko, president of Sony Pictures Television since 2000, added international markets to his duties and embarked on a cram course in Sony's overseas operations, which include 122 channels in more than 140 countries. Among the "vertically integrated" media giants, Sony is supposed to be at a disadvantage because it doesn't own a broadcast network or a bunch of cable channels through which it can funnel its shows.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 8, 2008 | Choire Sicha, Special to The Times
Months before its final 10 episodes begin airing in January, we now know for certain that "Battlestar Galactica" will live on -- in the form of a two-hour special on the Sci Fi Channel to air in 2009 after the series concludes. The unnamed feature will be directed by the show's costar, Edward James Olmos, and written by "Battlestar" writer and former "Buffy the Vampire Slayer" brain Jane Espenson. The stand-alone will document the Cylons' attempts -- those of two agents in particular -- to grapple with human survivors, both those aboard ships and those left alive on planets, shortly after the Cylons' destruction of human worlds.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 20, 2009 | David Davis
In the summer of 1968, events were roiling America and the world: the assassinations of Martin Luther King Jr. and Robert F. Kennedy; the escalation of the Vietnam War; the Soviet Union's invasion of Czechoslovakia; the radicalization of the civil rights movement. The tenor of the times consumed and overshadowed the competition at the Mexico City Olympics. Indeed, the '68 Games will forever be defined not by Bob Beamon's gravity-defying long jump, but by the black-gloved demonstration of sprinters Tommie Smith and John Carlos and the killing of protesting students by the Mexican police and army 10 days before the opening ceremonies.
WORLD
February 1, 2010 | By Tracy Wilkinson
When her husband went missing in Haiti's earthquake, Elcie Dyess turned to Signal FM radio station. Like thousands of other desperate people, she used the radio to broadcast an appeal for help. Her husband, Jean Francois, was last seen at the bank where he works, she told the audience. Help me find him. Scores of fellow bank employees responded by returning to the collapsed building. After hours of searching and digging, they pulled Jean Francois to safety. As the days since the quake have stretched into weeks, Signal FM has served as the voice of, and lifeline to, a traumatized society.
NATIONAL
September 27, 2009 | Andrew Malcolm and Johanna Neuman
Yep, it's true. There's no shame in America, only a rehab industry. Mark Foley, the Florida Republican who left Congress in 2006 amid accusations he sent lurid e-mails to male House pages, is credited with helping to sour the electorate's view of the Grand Old Party in a year when Nancy Pelosi and the Dems swept into power. In the years since, he's been in real estate investment, contemplating a return to politics. On Tuesday, he made his debut as a radio talk show host.
NATIONAL
January 7, 2014 | By Matt Pearce
It is, theoretically, a really cool gimmick. If you were in the Midwest when temperatures plunged to about 30 degrees below zero this week, it was probably cold enough to throw boiling water into the air and watch it freeze in midair. An ABC News reporter did just that on the air . So did a pair of TV meteorologists in Lexington, Ky. "All you have to do is bundle up, get some boiling water, and throw it out in the subzero temperatures and see what happens," one broadcaster in North Dakota said . "Threw a pot of boiling water in the air. Kids thought it was awesome," Jason DeRusha, a WCCO-TV anchor in Minneapolis, tweeted to his followers on Sunday . "Do it, people.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 29, 1995
Re "Dornan's Bid for Presidency Up in the Air," Aug. 23: It always has been; hot air rises. WILLIAM D. RUMMELL II Montbello
BOOKS
June 18, 1989 | KAREN STABINER
The problem with so much blockbuster fiction is that it seems--forgive me--made up, in the worst sense. It reads as though the author, with one eye on the bank balance and the other on the Best Seller's Ten Commandments (thou shalt not go more than 20 pages without a sex scene; thou shalt not allow thy heroine to end up broke; thou shalt honor thy clothing designers and brand names, etc. . . .) simply plopped the characters into a milieu and let 'em rip. There's no real sense of locale, no feeling that the author ever left his archetypal homey tartan-and-dark wood den or her cozy chintz boudoir.
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