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Airborne Warning And Control System Airplane

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NEWS
November 11, 1987 | From Reuters
Britain announced Tuesday that it has ordered a seventh U.S.-built AWACS early-warning aircraft, after the cancellation last December of its own equivalent Nimrod project. Defense Secretary George Younger, announcing the move in Parliament, said the AWACS (airborne warning and control system), built by the Boeing Co., will increase the country's ability to detect and monitor the approach of aircraft or missiles.
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NEWS
June 16, 1995 | ART PINE and WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The Pentagon is looking into whether NATO early warning radar planes flying close to Air Force Capt. Scott F. O'Grady's F-16 jet fighter on June 2 had enough time to warn him that reconnaissance aircraft had discovered Bosnian Serb missile batteries in the area.
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NEWS
February 12, 1991
At all hours of day and night, E-3 Sentry AWACS (Airborne Warning and Control System) jet transports crammed with sophisticated radar gear operated by highly trained specialists are flying over Saudi Arabia. They serve both as airborne flight controllers for all of the allied sorties and as spotters of enemy aircraft, missile and ships. Radar Modes The 30-foot rotating dome contains two antennas mounted back-to-back: the primary radar antenna and the Identification Friend or Foe (IFF) antenna.
NEWS
April 9, 1993 | TAMARA JONES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Germany's highest court gave the nation's military permission Thursday to join a combat mission abroad for the first time since World War II, and NATO announced that it would begin enforcing the "no-fly" zone over Bosnia-Herzegovina next week. Members of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization, meeting in Brussels, gave final approval to the first combat mission in the alliance's history.
NEWS
April 27, 1988 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, Times Staff Writer
The Reagan Administration, buoyed by Saudi Arabia's agreement to sign the nuclear non-proliferation treaty, vowed Tuesday to wage a no-holds-barred battle to overcome determined opposition on Capitol Hill to a $450-million sale of military hardware to the Persian Gulf kingdom. State Department spokesman Charles Redman said the proposed sale of ground support equipment for Saudi radar planes is "critical to our policy" in the gulf because the U.S.
NEWS
April 9, 1993 | TAMARA JONES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Germany's highest court gave the nation's military permission Thursday to join a combat mission abroad for the first time since World War II, and NATO announced that it would begin enforcing the "no-fly" zone over Bosnia-Herzegovina next week. Members of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization, meeting in Brussels, gave final approval to the first combat mission in the alliance's history.
NEWS
January 29, 1992 | Reuters
The Bush Administration said Tuesday it has notified Congress that it intends to sell three radar warning planes to Thailand for $382 million. The small E-2C airborne warning and control system planes (AWACS), used to defend U.S. aircraft carrier fleets, are built by Grumman Aerospace Corp. of Bethpage, N.Y. Congress is not expected to raise objections to the sale.
NEWS
June 16, 1995 | ART PINE and WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The Pentagon is looking into whether NATO early warning radar planes flying close to Air Force Capt. Scott F. O'Grady's F-16 jet fighter on June 2 had enough time to warn him that reconnaissance aircraft had discovered Bosnian Serb missile batteries in the area.
NEWS
January 17, 1991
The enormous concentration of U.S. weapons in the gulf features some of the world's most advanced airplanes and helicopters. Deployed from land bases and U.S. aircraft carriers in the Persian Gulf region, these aircraft offer allied forces decisive first-strike capabilities. Sensitive targets in Iraq Major Iraqi Air Bases: Irbil, Basra, Habbaniyah, An Nasiriyah, Kirkuk, Mosul, Shu-aiba, H-3, H-2. Major Nuclear Power Plants: Basra, Dibis, Baghdad.
NEWS
January 29, 1992 | Reuters
The Bush Administration said Tuesday it has notified Congress that it intends to sell three radar warning planes to Thailand for $382 million. The small E-2C airborne warning and control system planes (AWACS), used to defend U.S. aircraft carrier fleets, are built by Grumman Aerospace Corp. of Bethpage, N.Y. Congress is not expected to raise objections to the sale.
NEWS
February 12, 1991
At all hours of day and night, E-3 Sentry AWACS (Airborne Warning and Control System) jet transports crammed with sophisticated radar gear operated by highly trained specialists are flying over Saudi Arabia. They serve both as airborne flight controllers for all of the allied sorties and as spotters of enemy aircraft, missile and ships. Radar Modes The 30-foot rotating dome contains two antennas mounted back-to-back: the primary radar antenna and the Identification Friend or Foe (IFF) antenna.
NEWS
January 17, 1991
The enormous concentration of U.S. weapons in the gulf features some of the world's most advanced airplanes and helicopters. Deployed from land bases and U.S. aircraft carriers in the Persian Gulf region, these aircraft offer allied forces decisive first-strike capabilities. Sensitive targets in Iraq Major Iraqi Air Bases: Irbil, Basra, Habbaniyah, An Nasiriyah, Kirkuk, Mosul, Shu-aiba, H-3, H-2. Major Nuclear Power Plants: Basra, Dibis, Baghdad.
NEWS
April 27, 1988 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, Times Staff Writer
The Reagan Administration, buoyed by Saudi Arabia's agreement to sign the nuclear non-proliferation treaty, vowed Tuesday to wage a no-holds-barred battle to overcome determined opposition on Capitol Hill to a $450-million sale of military hardware to the Persian Gulf kingdom. State Department spokesman Charles Redman said the proposed sale of ground support equipment for Saudi radar planes is "critical to our policy" in the gulf because the U.S.
NEWS
November 11, 1987 | From Reuters
Britain announced Tuesday that it has ordered a seventh U.S.-built AWACS early-warning aircraft, after the cancellation last December of its own equivalent Nimrod project. Defense Secretary George Younger, announcing the move in Parliament, said the AWACS (airborne warning and control system), built by the Boeing Co., will increase the country's ability to detect and monitor the approach of aircraft or missiles.
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