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Aircraft Carrier

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 28, 2011 | By Molly Hennessy-Fiske, Los Angeles Times
It seems as if Darrik Benson, 28, had always wanted to be a Navy SEAL. There was no real logic to it. His father was not a military man. His grandfather was, but he was a pilot, serving with the Army during World War II. Benson grew up inland in Angwin, a small community at the northern end of the Napa Valley. He also hated the water. His grandmother remembers seeing the boy standing beside her backyard pool when he was 4 years old. He just stared at the other kids, she said, unwilling to take a dip. "He didn't want to get in over his belly button," Claudia Benson said.
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WORLD
August 24, 2011 | By David S. Cloud, Los Angeles Times
China's military is closing technical gaps that long have given the United States and its allies a military edge in Asia, although several ambitious new weapons systems and platforms appear years from completion, according to a new Pentagon assessment. China is developing a new stealth fighter, recently conducted sea trials on its first aircraft carrier and carried out a record number of satellite and other space launches in the last year, the report notes. It says China appears on track to achieve its goal of building a modern, regionally focused military by 2020.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 16, 2011 | By Tony Perry, Los Angeles Times
Reporting from San Diego -- To the tearful joy of military family members and the admiration of civilian onlookers, the aircraft carrier Carl Vinson returned to San Diego on Wednesday after a seven-month deployment that included the at-sea burial of Osama bin Laden. "It's like watching a piece of history float by," said Nicole Palazzolo, 29, of Port Huron, Mich., as she watched from San Diego's Harbor Island. "Those guys and girls, they're the real deal. If you don't believe me, ask Bin Laden.
NEWS
May 2, 2011 | By Tony Perry
After the 9/11 terrorist attacks on the United States, the aircraft carrier Carl Vinson was sent to start  the air assault to topple the Taliban government in Afghanistan and bring Osama bin Laden to justice. Starting Oct. 7, 2001, the carrier launched 4,000 combat sorties, playing a key role in removing the Taliban grip on the Afghan capital, Kabul. Now the Vinson, whose home port is now San Diego, has played another significant role in the Afghanistan war: as the platform from which Bin Laden's body was buried at sea. The burial, Navy officials said, followed Muslim custom, with the body washed and placed in a white sheet.
NEWS
May 2, 2011 | By James Oliphant, Washington Bureau
After landing by helicopter at the Pakistani compound housing Osama bin Laden early Monday, local time, the U.S. special operations team tasked with capturing or killing the Al Qaeda leader found itself in an almost continuous gun battle. For the next 40 minutes, the team cleared the two buildings within the fortified compound in Abbottabad, north of Islamabad, trying to reach Bin Laden and his family, who lived on the second and third floors of the largest structure, senior Defense Department and intelligence officials said Monday.
NEWS
May 1, 2011 | By Michael A. Memoli and Michael Muskal
Osama bin Laden, the world's most wanted terrorist, was killed in Pakistan as the result of a U.S. military operation, President Obama announced to the nation Sunday night. The historic revelation comes about four months before the 10th anniversary of the devastating Sept. 11 attacks on the United States, which were executed by the Al Qaeda network helmed by Bin Laden and prompted the start of a war on terror that has dominated U.S. foreign policy. Bin Laden, 54, was a member of a wealthy Saudi family and has been on the FBI's Most Wanted Fugitives List since 1999.
WORLD
March 14, 2011 | By Carol J. Williams, Los Angeles Times
An international aid effort swelled Monday to help Japan deal with the trio of catastrophes that have mired the country in sorrow and fear. More than 90 nations have offered assistance in searching for survivors and extracting the dead from Friday's magnitude 8.9 earthquake, the devastating tsunami it spawned and the threat of radiation contamination emanating from three damaged reactors in the hard-hit northeast. The aircraft carrier Ronald Reagan arrived in Japan to augment a fleet of U.S. naval vessels deployed to help with air rescue operations and to ferry relief supplies to the hundreds of thousands displaced by the disasters.
NEWS
March 11, 2011 | By Michael Muskal, Los Angeles Times
Japan struggled on Saturday to recover from its worst earthquake, which unleashed enough energy to generate a tsunami that threatened several countries along the Pacific Rim, including the United States where parts of California and the rest of the West Coast struggled to deal with rising tides. Japan struggled on Saturday to recover from its worst earthquake, which unleashed enough energy to generate a tsunami that threatened several countries along the Pacific Rim, including the United States where parts of California and the rest of the West Coast struggled to deal with rising tides.
WORLD
March 11, 2011 | By Carol J. Williams, Los Angeles Times
Japanese media reported at least 1,000 people are presumed dead from Friday's massive 8.9 earthquake, most drowned by the wall of water that swept across the northeast coast of the island nation. Thousands of others were stranded on rooftops, surrounded by water left by the tsunami that washed over the low-lying farmland of the hardest-hit areas, sweeping away homes, cars, railroads and businesses. A dam broke early Saturday local time in Fukushima Prefecture, washing away scores more houses in an area where at least 1,800 homes were destroyed by the quake, Kyodo news service said, quoting a Defense Ministry official.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 18, 2011 | By Shan Li, Los Angeles Times
The prosecutor and defense attorneys agreed on at least one thing: Sonia Rios Risken was a loathsome person. The 60-year-old woman from Lomita was under investigation by the FBI in 2006 after her second husband, a retired naval officer, was fatally shot while visiting her relatives in the Philippines. Her first husband, a retired Marine, was shot to death 19 years earlier under suspiciously similar circumstances. When news leaked that federal agents suspected Risken of masterminding both slayings, local media dubbed her the "Lomita Black Widow.
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