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BUSINESS
May 31, 2013 | By Hugo Martin
A Texas woman who claims she was injured by spilled coffee on a Continental Airlines flight is suing for $170,550. The suit by Lourdes Cervantes asks a U.S. District Court in Houston for a jury trial to seek damages against United Continental Holdings Inc., which took over when Continental merged with United Airlines. In the suit, Cervantes said the incident took place on a flight from Madrid to Newark, N.J., with Houston as the ulimate destination. She claims in the court document that a flight attendant was placing a hot cup of coffee on the seat-back tray in front of her when the passenger in the seat in front reclined, sending the coffee spilling onto her lap. Cervantes said she suffered second-degree burns on the inner thighs, resulting in permanent scarring and disfiguration.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 22, 2014 | By Jill Cowan
A man who went into full cardiac arrest died aboard a flight Tuesday morning from Dallas to John Wayne in Orange County, authorities said. Crew members attempted to revive the passenger but he was pronounced dead at 11:45 a.m. when the American Airlines jet landed. The county's coroner's office identified the passenger as John Selner, 78, of Fort Worth, Texas. Airport spokeswoman Jenny Wedge wrote in an email that crew members aboard the inbound American Airlines flight told officials at John Wayne that a passenger was in the midst of a medical emergency about 11:20 a.m. When the plane landed, the passenger was rushed to a secure place in one of the airport's three terminals until coroner's officials arrived, Wedge wrote.
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BUSINESS
March 22, 2012 | By Hugo Martin
U.S.-based airlines carried 730 million domestic and international passengers in 2011, the highest total since 2008, a government report said Thursday. The latest statistics from the U.S. Bureau of Transportation Statistics also showed that airlines flew with an average of 82.87% of all seats on domestic flights occupied in 2011, a record high for what the industry calls the "load factor. " On international flights, the load factor was 80.30% in 2011, the second highest rate for that category.
WORLD
April 19, 2014 | By Julie Makinen
BEIJING - On the first Sunday of March, China awoke to sickening news: Black-clad attackers with knives had hacked through crowds at the train station in the southern city of Kunming, killing 29 and injuring more than 140. Reporters leaped into action, gathering details from victims in their hospital beds. President Xi Jinping urged all-out efforts to investigate the slaughter. The incident was quickly dubbed "China's 9/11. " But by nightfall Monday, the state-run New China News Agency signaled that it was time to move on. "Kunming railway station serious violent terror case is successfully solved," its headline said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 28, 1999
A passenger on a weekend flight to Atlanta has been ordered held in custody on charges of assaulting four people. Hung Cong Duong, 30, of Vietnam was held after his arraignment Monday afternoon in Las Vegas. His preliminary hearing is scheduled for Aug. 6. FBI spokesman Kevin Caudle said Duong was on a Delta flight from Los Angeles to Atlanta early Saturday when he became upset that a flight attendant would not serve him before other passengers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 22, 2001 | From Times Staff Reports
An Asiana Airlines jumbo jet from Inchon, South Korea, landed safely early Wednesday at Los Angeles International Airport after a passenger made a bomb threat early in the flight, an FBI spokeswoman said. El Cajon resident Young Kun Kim, 62, verbally abused flight attendants about 30 minutes into the flight because he was unhappy about his seat assignment, said Laura Bosley, a spokeswoman for the FBI's Los Angeles office.
NEWS
August 29, 1998 | From Times Wire Services
Passengers on commercial airlines can now check in a can of Mace or pepper spray with their luggage, but they face penalties if they carry the self-defense spray on board with them, the Federal Aviation Administration said Friday. The agency adjusted its regulations in response to numerous requests from flight crew members and passengers who said they want a means of self-protection once they arrive at their destinations.
NATIONAL
January 26, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
A woman passed through security screening at New York's LaGuardia Airport with a stun gun and knife in her purse -- but later discovered the mistake herself and alerted authorities. The woman realized she was carrying the items Saturday after a short layover in Detroit and while she was on her way to Denver. She alerted a flight attendant, said Spirit Airlines spokeswoman Laura Bennett.
NEWS
October 2, 2001 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
The new Customs Service commissioner says he wants his agency to have access to airlines' advance lists of passengers to screen for possible terrorists. Robert C. Bonner said in an Associated Press interview that he first wants the passenger information for all international flights bound for U.S. soil. He said Congress also should consider mandating that such information be turned over for domestic flights.
NEWS
November 1, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
A measure moving through the Senate would require all airlines flying to the United States to turn over their passenger manifests so officials can check them against lists of suspected terrorists. Sen. Byron L. Dorgan (D-N.D.) got the provision placed on a Labor, Health and Human Services and Education spending bill that senators will vote on today, Senate leaders said.
BUSINESS
March 2, 2014 | By Hugo Martin
A food fight is breaking out in the airline industry. Airline seats and fares are so indistinguishable among the nation's major airlines that carriers often try to promote other services - such as onboard entertainment, food or airport lounges - to win over new passengers. “It's always been a fight for airlines to decommoditize what is largely a commodity,” said Seth Kaplan, a managing partner of the trade magazine Airline Weekly. Take for example, Virgin America, the California-based airline that recently announced a posh new menu for first-class fliers.
BUSINESS
December 16, 2013 | By Hugo Martín
If you are a parent who lets your children scream and go nuts on a plane, congratulations - you top the list of most annoying etiquette violators in the air. Parents who travel with loud children are considered more annoying than passengers who kick the in front of them and travelers with foul odors. Even fliers who take off their shoes and socks in the air-tight cabin are less offensive, according to a survey of 1,001 Americans by the travel website Expedia. Annoying children and their parents were ranked by 41% of those surveyed as the most annoying airplane etiquette violators.
WORLD
December 5, 2013 | By Barbara Demick and Yuriko Nagano
TOKYO -- Although she is a seasoned traveler who frequently flies the route between Tokyo and Hong Kong, Kazuyo Ito confessed to some preflight anxiety as she checked in Thursday for Japan Airlines Flight 29. "It is a little scary," said the 59-year-old housewife, when asked about China's threat to stop aircraft that refuse to identify themselves when flying through a large swath of the East China Sea. FOR THE RECORD: China air...
BUSINESS
October 13, 2013 | By Hugo Martin
An arms race is heating up among airlines battling to lure passengers with a taste for luxury. Etihad Airways fired a volley in the war recently when it announced that it is offering the services of nannies and onboard chefs on long-haul flights from Los Angeles. The chefs will serve made-to-order meals only for customers in the “diamond first class” seats, but the “Flying Nannies” will help clean, pamper and entertain children throughout the plane. “It's all about how to differentiate yourself for regular travelers,” Etihad president and chief executive James Hogan said about the new services.
BUSINESS
July 14, 2013 | By Hugo Martin
With Madrid-based Iberia Airlines, you can now bag it and tag it yourself. The airline claims it is the only carrier to let passengers print out luggage tags at home. Seattle-based Alaska Airlines tested the idea of home tagging for passengers flying from Seattle to Hawaii last year but has not continued the program. Alaska, along with several other carriers, lets passengers print out luggage tags from airport kiosks. Iberia passengers can print their luggage tags at home and download their boarding passes onto their smartphones.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 6, 2013 | By Harriet Ryan, Shelby Grad and Carlos Lozano
San Francisco International Airport was closed after a Boeing 777 operated by Asiana Airlines crashed while landing on Saturday. It's unknown when the airport will reopen. Photos taken by a passenger on the plane shows people on the runway with smoke coming from the aircraft. In a brief phone interview, a passenger from the flight who didn't want to give his name told the Los Angeles Times that most of the passengers on the flight were unharmed. “I just want their families to know,” he said.
BUSINESS
August 29, 2012 | By Andrew Tangel, Los Angeles Times
Alert Alec Baldwin. It may one day be OK to use a personal electronic device when your plane takes off. The Federal Aviation Administration is putting together a group to study mobile electronic device use by passengers. It will be looking at what gadgets passengers can safely use while aboard and when. But cellphone calls will be off the table. The FAA said the group would not be considering "the airborne use of cellphones for voice communications. " It is possible, however, that this could be an early step toward the agency's revising its ban on using laptops, tablet computers, e-readers and smartphones (for Internet uses)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 7, 2001 | DAVID ROSENZWEIG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An Iranian immigrant was convicted Thursday of interfering with the crew of a passenger plane bound from Los Angeles to Toronto Sept. 27 by allegedly threatening to "kill all Americans." Javid Naghani, a 37-year-old Woodland Hills businessman, faces up to 10 years in prison for his conviction by a U.S. District Court jury in Los Angeles. He is to be sentenced March 4.
BUSINESS
June 13, 2013 | By Hugo Martin
The furlough of air traffic controllers imposed by the federal sequester in April lasted only a week. But statistics released Thursday show that the resulting delays hurt the on-time performance of the airline industry for the entire month. The on-time rating for the nation's airlines dropped to 77.3% in April, compared to 86.3% for April of 2012, according to the U.S. Department of Transportation. The carriers also reported canceling 1.8% of their flights in April, up from 1.0% in the same month in 2012, according to the federal agency.
BUSINESS
June 3, 2013 | By Hugo Martín, Los Angeles Times
The "nude scanners" are gone. The full-body scanners that used X-rays to create what look like nude images of passengers have been packed away and removed from airports across the country. The 250 or so machines were removed about two weeks ago, before the June 1 deadline set by Congress. But privacy advocates aren't satisfied, noting that the Transportation Security Administration is still using full-body scanners that employ a different technology. "They've never made a case that these scanners are better than using metal detectors or swabs to detect the use of explosives," said Marc Rotenberg, executive director of the Electronic Privacy Information Center, a research center that sued the TSA in 2010 over the use of all full-body scanners.
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