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Airline Ticket

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TRAVEL
May 27, 2013 | By Tom Parsons
If you buy an airline ticket and need to change or cancel your itinerary, you could be in for an even more unpleasant surprise. Most travelers buy nonrefundable tickets because they cost considerably less than refundable tickets. But a couple of airlines have recently raised fees for changing and canceling nonrefundable domestic tickets, and they could be joined by more airlines in the coming weeks. Last month, United increased its change fee on nonrefundable domestic tickets to $200, up from $150.
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WORLD
January 24, 2014 | By Mery Mogollon and Chris Kraul
CARACAS, Venezuela - Three more international airlines on Friday joined the list of companies that have suspended ticket sales in Venezuela, complaining that the government owes them billions of dollars. U.S.-based American Airlines and United Airlines and Panama's Copa Airlines said they were halting ticket sales in Venezuela in lieu of the government's failure to pay arrears that as of last month totaled $2.6 billion. Under Venezuela's complicated foreign exchange rules, the government acts as intermediary in foreign sales of goods and services transacted in the country.
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BUSINESS
January 29, 2012 | By Hugo Martin
New federal regulations aimed at giving airline passengers the true price of their tickets when booking a flight may provide some travelers with an unpleasant surprise. The new U.S. Department of Transportation rules that took effect last week require airlines to include taxes and fees in their advertised prices. But travel experts say they may have the unintended effect of reducing airline ticket sales by scaring away passengers with prices that suddenly seem much higher than in the past.
TRAVEL
October 6, 2013
You're getting down to booking your airline ticket. Because you checked ahead of time - you did, didn't you? - you know how much you will have to pay if you make a change to your nonrefundable ticket. Then you see a glimmer of hope. The airline or the online travel agency is offering you a chance to buy insurance. Maybe that's a hedge against having to pay a change fee that could cost you $200. Is this the answer to your prayers? Depends on what you're praying for. Let's say your petition sounds like this: "Please, (name higher power here)
NEWS
July 23, 2011 | By Jane Engle, Special to the Los Angeles times
Finally, good news from the gridlock in Congress. Or maybe not. The federal government Saturday stopped collecting taxes on airline tickets, so flying suddenly got cheaper, right? Wrong. Many airlines just increased their airfares to match the tax drop. At stake can be about $30 on a $300 ticket, the Associated Press says. What happened is that squabbling lawmakers failed to extend laws that authorize the government to collect the airline ticket tax and other aviation-related taxes.
NEWS
October 18, 2010 | By Mary Forgione, Los Angeles Times Daily Travel & Deal blogger
Mistakes, I've made a few, but then again, too few to mention. Well, these bear mentioning in case they ever happen to you while you are booking an airline ticket online. Stupid mistake No. 1: At the end of a long day recently, I went online and bought two round-trip tickets from Los Angeles to Seattle at a price I liked and had the itineraries e-mailed to myself and my husband. The next day my husband checked the flights and called to tell me I was celebrating Backwards Day early: I had inadvertently booked the flights starting in Seattle instead of Los Angeles.
TRAVEL
August 19, 2012 | By Catharine Hamm, Los Angeles Times
Instead of the usual question-and-answer format this week, I'll address a question that's the equivalent of a bug bite on the behind for leisure travelers: Isn't anybody watching out for us? Our business travel brethren seem to get all the love and attention from travel providers. It's not that they don't deserve it; road warriors have a tough, well, road, juggling regular work with irregular travel schedules. They get perks for the frequency with which they do this. The leisure traveler generally does not, and it does leave us feeling as though we're not Mom's favorite.
BUSINESS
January 11, 2011 | David Lazarus
Who owns an airline ticket ? you or the airline? That's the intriguing question Santa Monica resident Peter Szabo faced during the holidays when he attempted to use just half of a $435 round-trip ticket that he'd purchased three months earlier from US Airways. The carrier said Szabo, 32, would need to pay hundreds of dollars more to make just a single leg of the journey. "Basically, they wanted me to pay an additional $350 to use only half of what I already owned," Szabo told me. "I can't think of another scenario in another industry that would compare.
TRAVEL
October 7, 2012 | By Catharine Hamm, Los Angeles Times
If you book an airline ticket through an online site or go to a travel agent, you get the ticket price and, thanks to recent U.S. Department of Transportation rulings, that price includes taxes and fees. What you don't get - at least, not yet - is a price that includes ancillary fees (baggage, early boarding, seat choices), but consumer advocates are working toward that. But the changes in store for ticket booking may be even greater. Booking could be the all-new Mr. Toad's Wild Ride.
TRAVEL
November 4, 2012 | By Catharine Hamm, Los Angeles Times
Question: Several readers have asked for information about what to do when a relative who plans to make an airline trip dies before the trip can be taken. Does nonrefundable mean nonrefundable? Answer: When airlines say "nonrefundable fare," they usually mean it. Except when they don't. Don't get excited. This doesn't mean you'll get your money back if, say, you change your mind about going to (fill-in-the-blank place) because you're worried about (fill-in-the-blank anxiety-inducing issue)
TRAVEL
May 27, 2013 | By Tom Parsons
If you buy an airline ticket and need to change or cancel your itinerary, you could be in for an even more unpleasant surprise. Most travelers buy nonrefundable tickets because they cost considerably less than refundable tickets. But a couple of airlines have recently raised fees for changing and canceling nonrefundable domestic tickets, and they could be joined by more airlines in the coming weeks. Last month, United increased its change fee on nonrefundable domestic tickets to $200, up from $150.
NEWS
May 21, 2013 | By Terry Gardner
A new tool from Danish travel site Momondo.com may help take away some of the stress of flight shopping by advising us when to buy an airline ticket. More than a simple price calendar, Momondo's Flight Insights tool considers six essential factors that determine the price of a ticket for a particular flight search: number of days in advance, time of day, day of the week, seasonality, airport and airline.  Even if you are booking a last-minute ticket, this tool can help determine which airline normally has the lowest price fares for a particular route.
BUSINESS
April 23, 2013 | David Lazarus
Barbara Butkus bought an airline ticket in November to fly from Palm Springs to Washington, D.C., a month later for a family reunion. Just to be on the safe side, Butkus, 80, also bought travel insurance while booking her flight through Orbitz, the online travel agency. The coverage was from Allianz, a leading provider of travel insurance. As it happened, Butkus had to cancel her trip for health reasons. She began experiencing shortness of breath in early December, and her doctor advised her not to travel.
TRAVEL
November 11, 2012 | By Catharine Hamm, Los Angeles Times
Question: I have always wondered about airline companies' yield management systems. Do airlines track only sales, or do they track inquiries as well to determine the demand in their yield systems? Let's say I'm interested in a round-trip ticket between Los Angeles and Tokyo, so I do the flight search on various airlines' sites and on several travel sites as well. Because I transmit a lot of inquiries about this specific Los Angeles-Tokyo route on a specific day and time, will that show up as increased demand and cause the fare to be adjusted up as the result?
TRAVEL
November 4, 2012 | By Catharine Hamm, Los Angeles Times
Question: Several readers have asked for information about what to do when a relative who plans to make an airline trip dies before the trip can be taken. Does nonrefundable mean nonrefundable? Answer: When airlines say "nonrefundable fare," they usually mean it. Except when they don't. Don't get excited. This doesn't mean you'll get your money back if, say, you change your mind about going to (fill-in-the-blank place) because you're worried about (fill-in-the-blank anxiety-inducing issue)
BUSINESS
October 19, 2012 | By Gregory Karp
CHICAGO - Fliers today can find it difficult to keep their options open while trying to get good seats and locking in a good price, especially with airfares changing often and planes more crowded. Nobody wants to buy a $600 nonrefundable ticket, have their plans fall through and not be able to use it - or be forced to pay exorbitant fees to change flights. That's precisely the problem several companies aim to fix. Perhaps it's fitting that Chicago - home of the world's largest exchange for financial options, the Chicago Board Options Exchange - also is home to companies that are selling, or plan to sell, options on airline tickets.
TRAVEL
April 1, 2012 | By Catharine Hamm, Los Angeles Times
If you're hoping to book airline tickets for your summer vacation, you may be feeling some extra pain in your pocketbook. A trifecta of factors is playing havoc with airline ticket prices ($1,400 round-trip from LAX to London's Heathrow? Really?) and pinching penny-pinchers' budgets. Airline experts say you can pinch back. Here are some suggestions. Don't go. The consumer can express his displeasure about airfare prices by boycotting. That's easier for the leisure traveler, of course, but decreased passenger counts could make airlines sit up and take notice.
TRAVEL
August 28, 2011 | By Catharine Hamm, Los Angeles Times Travel editor
Question: My wife and I and another couple plan to meet this winter in Santiago, Chile. Our friends used credit card points to book their airfare with American Airlines, departing from Portland, Ore. They were charged $55 per ticket for taxes and fees. We used Marriott points for two tickets from Los Angeles to Santiago, booking through Aeromexico. I was stunned to be charged $672 per ticket for taxes and fees. Last year, we used Marriott points for a flight to Sydney, Australia, on Qantas and were charged about $70 per ticket for taxes and fees.
TRAVEL
October 7, 2012 | By Catharine Hamm, Los Angeles Times
If you book an airline ticket through an online site or go to a travel agent, you get the ticket price and, thanks to recent U.S. Department of Transportation rulings, that price includes taxes and fees. What you don't get - at least, not yet - is a price that includes ancillary fees (baggage, early boarding, seat choices), but consumer advocates are working toward that. But the changes in store for ticket booking may be even greater. Booking could be the all-new Mr. Toad's Wild Ride.
TRAVEL
September 16, 2012 | By Jen Leo
Would you pay to lock in a low rate for a flight? Name: Steadyfare.com What it does: For as little as $15, Steadyfare lets you purchase the option to lock in a rate for a flight. There's no obligation to purchase the ticket; Steadyfare just guarantees the rate if you decide later you want it. What's hot: If the ticket price has dipped below your Steadyfare rate at the time you purchase your ticket, you pay the lower amount. If the price goes up after you purchase your Steadyfare, it will cover the difference.
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