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BUSINESS
October 19, 2012 | By Gregory Karp
CHICAGO - Fliers today can find it difficult to keep their options open while trying to get good seats and locking in a good price, especially with airfares changing often and planes more crowded. Nobody wants to buy a $600 nonrefundable ticket, have their plans fall through and not be able to use it - or be forced to pay exorbitant fees to change flights. That's precisely the problem several companies aim to fix. Perhaps it's fitting that Chicago - home of the world's largest exchange for financial options, the Chicago Board Options Exchange - also is home to companies that are selling, or plan to sell, options on airline tickets.
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WORLD
January 24, 2014 | By Mery Mogollon and Chris Kraul
CARACAS, Venezuela - Three more international airlines on Friday joined the list of companies that have suspended ticket sales in Venezuela, complaining that the government owes them billions of dollars. U.S.-based American Airlines and United Airlines and Panama's Copa Airlines said they were halting ticket sales in Venezuela in lieu of the government's failure to pay arrears that as of last month totaled $2.6 billion. Under Venezuela's complicated foreign exchange rules, the government acts as intermediary in foreign sales of goods and services transacted in the country.
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NEWS
March 2, 1997 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
President Clinton signed legislation reinstating a 10% tax on airline tickets for domestic flights. The aviation tax, extended to Sept. 30, also imposes a $6 per-ticket fee on international flights. The tax becomes effective in six days. The ticket tax expired Dec. 31. Its revenues go to the airport and airways trust fund, which is used to pay for improvements to airports and the air traffic control system.
TRAVEL
May 27, 2013 | By Tom Parsons
If you buy an airline ticket and need to change or cancel your itinerary, you could be in for an even more unpleasant surprise. Most travelers buy nonrefundable tickets because they cost considerably less than refundable tickets. But a couple of airlines have recently raised fees for changing and canceling nonrefundable domestic tickets, and they could be joined by more airlines in the coming weeks. Last month, United increased its change fee on nonrefundable domestic tickets to $200, up from $150.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 16, 1999 | HOLLY J. WOLCOTT
Two men stole about $60 in cash and 1,500 blank airline tickets from a travel agency Saturday, authorities said. The armed robbery occurred shortly before 10 a.m. at Simi Travel Services in the 1700 block of East Los Angeles Avenue. "This has been going on for some time," Simi Police Sgt. Randy Foushee said of stealing airline tickets.
TRAVEL
September 12, 1999
Ever wish you could convert that pesky nonrefundable airline ticket into a refundable one? Like when you got sick at the last minute before visiting Aunt Mary in Kansas? Actually, you can. For $11.98 per ticket, a 2 1/2-year-old Orlando, Fla., travel agency is selling its customers a very basic insurance policy that provides benefits only if they miss a scheduled flight due to illness or injury to themselves, a spouse, children or a guardian.
BUSINESS
September 10, 1988 | ROBERT W. STEWART, Times Staff Writer
A federal judge in Los Angeles dealt a setback Friday to a dozen air carriers that have accused American Airlines and United Airlines of illegally monopolizing the nation's computerized airline ticketing business. U.S. District Judge Edward Rafeedie ordered that two groups of airlines that have filed an antitrust lawsuit against American and United may not present to a jury their claim that the two airlines engaged in a conspiracy to dominate the ticketing business.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 13, 1987 | KIM MURPHY, Times Staff Writer
A fraud ring believed responsible for more than $1 million in illegal sales of airline tickets has been broken up in South Los Angeles, authorities said Thursday. The Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department said one man has been arrested and nine other federal indictments are pending against the leaders of a ring that allegedly brokered fraudulently purchased tickets to travelers throughout the country.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 5, 2012 | By Tony Perry, Los Angeles Times
Reporting from San Diego -- Corruption charges were announced Wednesday against two trustees of a suburban school district, a former trustee, a former superintendent and a building contractor in what San Diego County Dist. Atty. Bonnie Dumanis called a "pay for play" culture involving contracts for school construction projects. "The widespread corruption we uncovered during our investigation of this case is outrageous and shameful," Dumanis said in announcing 26 charges against the five defendants.
BUSINESS
November 8, 2011 | By Hugo Martín, Los Angeles Times
Travelers planning to fly for the Thanksgiving holiday face two helpings of bad news: Ticket prices are expected to be 6% to 12% higher than last year, and empty seats will be even harder to find. Because airlines have cut thousands of available seats for the holiday, low-fare airline tickets for the busiest days will go quickly, leaving only high-priced seats or fares for flights several days before or after the holiday. "With the reduced capacity, planes are going to be more full," said Joe Megibow, vice president and general manager of travel website Expedia.com.
BUSINESS
April 1, 2013 | By David Lazarus
The airline industry thinks it's just plain unfair that they have to disclose the total cost of a ticket to passengers. The U.S. Supreme Court begs to differ. The justices have left intact Transportation Department rules requiring airlines to prominently feature the total cost of air travel in ads and online, rather than lower -- and misleading -- pretax prices. The airlines had shamelessly argued that the rules violate their free-speech rights by preventing them from illustrating how fees and taxes drive up passenger costs.
TRAVEL
March 3, 2013 | By Millie Ball
KARLOVY VARY, Czech Republic - We had been collecting frequent-flier points for years. My husband, Keith, and I thought that, yes, of course, we would use them. We would fly around the world. Business class. Maybe next year. Queen Latifah shoved us out of our fantasy and onto the planes. It happened after we watched "Last Holiday" one more time. In it, Queen Latifah portrays a shy New Orleans department store clerk with a crush on fellow employee LL Cool J. Her dreams are confined to a scrapbook of "Possibilities.
NEWS
January 7, 2013 | By Mary Forgione, Los Angeles Times Daily Travel & Deal blogger
I don't know about you, but I take those unattended baggage announcements at airports seriously, mostly because I don't want my luggage confiscated or blown up before it gets put on a plane. I came across this "Candid Camera"-like perky video that goes against all we've learned since 9/11 security procedures went into effect: People picking up unattended items that aren't theirs at a baggage carousel. OK, the items are brightly packaged and, like something out of "Alice in Wonderland," say, "Pick me up!"
BUSINESS
December 3, 2012 | By Hugo Martín, Los Angeles Times
Anyone who has flown on a commercial airline recently might assume that air carriers have run out of ideas for new passenger fees. After all, the world's biggest airlines are expected this year to rake in $36.1 billion from fees for such things as food, drinks, wireless Internet service, roomier seats and checked bags. But the airline industry is not resting on its money-making laurels. At a three-day Airline Information conference in San Diego last week, airline representatives met with technology firms, marketing companies and others to discuss ways to maximize airline passenger fees.
BUSINESS
December 2, 2012 | By Hugo Martin
Anyone who has flown on a commercial airline recently might assume that air carriers have run out of ideas for new passenger fees. After all, the world's biggest airlines are expected this year to collect $36.1 billion in revenue for food, drinks, wireless Internet service, roomier seats and checked bags. But the airline industry is not resting on its money-making laurels. At a three-day “Airline Information” conference in San Diego last week, airline representatives met with technology firms, marketing companies and others to discuss ways to maximize airline passenger fees.
TRAVEL
November 4, 2012 | By Catharine Hamm, Los Angeles Times
Question: Several readers have asked for information about what to do when a relative who plans to make an airline trip dies before the trip can be taken. Does nonrefundable mean nonrefundable? Answer: When airlines say "nonrefundable fare," they usually mean it. Except when they don't. Don't get excited. This doesn't mean you'll get your money back if, say, you change your mind about going to (fill-in-the-blank place) because you're worried about (fill-in-the-blank anxiety-inducing issue)
BUSINESS
January 23, 2012 | By Hugo Martín, Los Angeles Times
Even when buying airline tickets, timing is everything. Passengers can get the lowest airfares if they buy six weeks before their flight, according to a study by Airlines Reporting Corp., an Arlington, Va., company that handles ticketing transactions between the nation's airlines and travel agents. The study looked at millions of transactions for airline tickets over the last four years and found that passengers pay the lowest price, nearly 6% below the overall average fare, if they buy six weeks before their flight.
BUSINESS
October 19, 2012 | By Gregory Karp
CHICAGO - Fliers today can find it difficult to keep their options open while trying to get good seats and locking in a good price, especially with airfares changing often and planes more crowded. Nobody wants to buy a $600 nonrefundable ticket, have their plans fall through and not be able to use it - or be forced to pay exorbitant fees to change flights. That's precisely the problem several companies aim to fix. Perhaps it's fitting that Chicago - home of the world's largest exchange for financial options, the Chicago Board Options Exchange - also is home to companies that are selling, or plan to sell, options on airline tickets.
TRAVEL
October 7, 2012 | By Catharine Hamm, Los Angeles Times
If you book an airline ticket through an online site or go to a travel agent, you get the ticket price and, thanks to recent U.S. Department of Transportation rulings, that price includes taxes and fees. What you don't get - at least, not yet - is a price that includes ancillary fees (baggage, early boarding, seat choices), but consumer advocates are working toward that. But the changes in store for ticket booking may be even greater. Booking could be the all-new Mr. Toad's Wild Ride.
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