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May 5, 1989 | From Associated Press
The Bush Administration says it might prohibit airline passengers from taking aboard portable computers, tape players, hair dryers and other electronic devices as a stopgap measure against terrorist bombings. The ban, covering items carried by hand or in luggage, would prevent such items from being used to smuggle plastic explosives aboard planes until sophisticated bomb-detection devices can be installed at high-risk airports around the world. Both Transportation Secretary Samuel Skinner and his deputy secretary, Elaine Chao, raised the possibility of a total ban on electronic devices in forums this week.
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NEWS
April 27, 2014 | By Julie Makinen
BEIJING -- Private companies specializing in deep ocean search will be hired to continue the quest to find Malaysia Airlines Flight 370, Australia's prime minister said Monday, and the cost could run more than $55 million and take six to eight months. The U.S. Navy's robotic submarine Bluefin-21 has searched more than 150 square miles of the floor of the Indian Ocean in an area where investigators thought they had detected pings from the Boeing 777's black box transmitters in early April.
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BUSINESS
July 31, 1996 | From Times Wire Services
Passengers on Swissair's long-haul jets later this year will get a chance to do some casino-style gambling during their flights. Las Vegas-based Interactive Flight Technologies has completed a contract with Swissair for the installation of its In-Flight Entertainment Network on all of the airline's long-haul jets. The first plane is scheduled to be equipped with the system, which will cost between $70 million and $80 million, in October and to be in flight by November.
BUSINESS
April 27, 2014 | By Hugo Martin
Airline mergers have put more than 70% of the nation's domestic traffic in the hands of four major carriers. But low-cost airlines still have some influence over airfares. A new study shows that when an airline such as JetBlue, Spirit, Frontier, Alaska and Southwest launches service on an existing domestic route, the average price from all carriers drops as much as 67%. It's good news for travelers, but aviation experts say most popular routes are still dominated by the four biggest carriers - United, Delta, Southwest and the soon-to-be-merged American Airlines and US Airways.
BUSINESS
April 21, 2001
* AMR Corp.'s American Airlines said it's dropping two daily international nonstop flights, between Los Angeles and Paris and between Chicago and Rome, citing "changing economic conditions." American plans to end the service routes Nov. 1.
BUSINESS
April 27, 2014 | By Hugo Martín
Airline mergers have put more than 70% of the nation's domestic traffic in the hands of four major carriers. But low-cost airlines still have some influence over airfares. A new study shows that when airlines such as JetBlue, Spirit, Frontier, Alaska and Southwest launch service on an existing domestic route, the average price from all carriers drops as much as 67%. It's good news for travelers, but aviation experts say most popular routes are still dominated by the four biggest carriers: United, Delta, Southwest and the soon-to-be-merged American and US Airways.
BUSINESS
April 27, 2014 | By Hugo Martin
Florida-based Spirit Airlines has topped another unflattering ranking. A few weeks ago the U.S. Public Interest Research Group Education Fund analyzed complaint rates among passengers over the last five years. The ultra-low-cost carrier came out on top of that list. Spirit now ranks at the top again - for the rudest flight attendants. A survey of 3,400 people by the travel website Airfarewatchdog found that 26% said Spirit has the rudest flight attendants. Air Canada came in second with 14%, followed by Frontier Airlines with 11% and Virgin America with 9%. Southwest Airlines was at the bottom of the list, with only 1%. The service given by flight attendants may reflect how they are treated by airlines, according to a flight attendants union.
SPORTS
April 26, 2014 | By Lance Pugmire
DALLAS - It's taken them longer than they wanted, but the Ducks have found a formula to beat the fast, physical Dallas Stars. Now it's just a matter of proving it translates to the enemy ground of American Airlines Center. "You want to finish it here. That's our mind-set," Ducks forward Corey Perry said Saturday. Friday's 6-2 victory in Anaheim gave the Western Conference top-seeded Ducks a 3-2 lead in the first-round playoff series with Game 6 Sunday in Dallas, where both of the Ducks' losses have occurred.
BUSINESS
April 25, 2014 | By Hugo Martin
A government study on the effects of airline mergers found that flight cancellations and delays increased when competition on a route drops. The study by the U.S. Department of Transportation's inspector general was ordered by Congress in the wake of the proposal to merge American Airlines and US Airways into the world's largest air carrier. The study looked at delays and cancellation rates when the number of airlines serving a route dropped from three to two airlines. It looked at 32.2 million flights and flight performances from 70 U.S. airports.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 22, 2014 | By Jill Cowan
A man who went into full cardiac arrest died aboard a flight Tuesday morning from Dallas to John Wayne in Orange County, authorities said. Crew members attempted to revive the passenger but he was pronounced dead at 11:45 a.m. when the American Airlines jet landed. The county's coroner's office identified the passenger as John Selner, 78, of Fort Worth, Texas. Airport spokeswoman Jenny Wedge wrote in an email that crew members aboard the inbound American Airlines flight told officials at John Wayne that a passenger was in the midst of a medical emergency about 11:20 a.m. When the plane landed, the passenger was rushed to a secure place in one of the airport's three terminals until coroner's officials arrived, Wedge wrote.
BUSINESS
April 22, 2014 | By Hugo Martin
A national study on customer satisfaction suggests that passenger satisfaction ratings slump after airlines undergo a merger with another carrier. The nation's top airlines received a combined score of 69 on a 1-to-100 scale, below the average scores for banks, insurance companies, gas stations, hotels and the U.S. Postal Service, according to the American Customer Satisfaction Index, an annual study released Tuesday. The airlines' score remained the same from last year's customer satisfaction score.
SPORTS
April 20, 2014 | By Lance Pugmire
DALLAS -- The Ducks established their franchise record for road victories this season (25), winning at hostile dens like San Jose, Staples Center, St. Louis (twice) and Chicago. Monday night at Dallas is a different animal. The Stars, trailing Anaheim, 2-0, in a Western Conference first-round series, haven't played a home playoff game since May 19, 2008, when they were eliminated by the Detroit Red Wings in the Western Conference finals. "Desperate team, their fans are going to be pumped," former Stars and current Ducks defenseman Stephane Robidas said Sunday after his team practiced at American Airlines Center.
BUSINESS
April 20, 2014 | By Hugo Martin
If you thought airlines could find no new ways to squeeze more passengers into each plane, you are underestimating the resolve of the airline industry. At this month's Aircraft Interior Expo in Hamburg, Germany, many of the 500 exhibitors were promoting new ideas to cut down on weight - thus saving airlines fuel - and innovative layouts to fit more seats per cabin. Among the concepts offered at the expo was a set of seats that put passengers face to face, seats that are installed in a staggered, diagonal layout and redesigning lavatories to wedge in a few extra passengers in the back of the cabin.
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