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NEWS
September 17, 1994 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Japan Air Lines' plan to start hiring contract flight attendants at half the pay of full-status employees has stirred a new controversy here over government intervention in private business. The battle--unusual only in that it has gone public--is not over yet. But signs are pointing to a victory for business. It started in August, just as JAL was about to interview applicants for jobs as contract flight attendants.
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BUSINESS
August 15, 1994 | From Reuters
USAir Group Inc. and its pilots union are further apart on wage concessions than expected, but a deal to rescue the troubled carrier from high labor costs still looks possible, analysts say. Before the union issued a sweeping proposal early this month to restructure USAir in exchange for pay cuts, some analysts had seen the airline implementing labor cost savings by September. That forecast now looks overly optimistic.
BUSINESS
August 13, 1994 | CHRIS WOODYARD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Continental Airlines launched a fall air fare sale Friday that slashed airline ticket prices from Los Angeles to the East Coast to as low as $318 round trip. Major carriers, including American and USAir, said they will match the fare reductions of up to 60%, but only on competitive routes. The fare cuts come despite one of the healthiest summers in recent years for airlines.
BUSINESS
August 8, 1994 | JAMES F. PELTZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
More than 900 Delta Air Lines workers face the prospect that they'll either have to leave California or quit their jobs because of a lease dispute between Delta and Los Angeles airport officials. At issue is Delta's 40-acre city-owned facility on Century Boulevard next to Los Angeles International Airport. Delta, with its lease expiring next March, faces sharply higher rent if it wants to stay on the property.
BUSINESS
August 7, 1994 | CHRIS WOODYARD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
His black valise in tow and a blank stare on his face, Christopher Atayan waits to board a small American Eagle turboprop that he dubs "the flying sewer pipe." Atayan logs 100,000 air miles a year as a New York investment banker. Too many of them, he said, are aboard cramped little puddle jumpers like the one he waits to board.
BUSINESS
June 12, 1994 | CHRIS WOODYARD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The name is Reno Air, but it could just as easily be called American Airlines Jr. Each day, Reno Air grows closer to the troubled Texas-based behemoth, which is retreating from money-losing short flights to concentrate on more profitable, cross-country routes. American has been handing off many of its West Coast runs to 17-plane Reno Air rather than try to compete with discount carrier Southwest Airlines.
BUSINESS
June 12, 1994 | JAMES FLANIGAN
Is employee ownership a guide through the minefield of the American workplace today? "It's no panacea, but it can help if it's handled well," says Joseph Vittoria, chairman of Avis Inc., the "We try harder" car renter that is one of the most successful of employee-owned companies. Vittoria, 59, may soon get an even larger challenge in employee ownership.
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