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NEWS
September 24, 2000 | From Associated Press
A whistle-blower at Alaska Airlines has filed a $20-million lawsuit accusing the carrier of defamation for allegedly portraying him on its Web site as incompetent. The lawsuit was filed in California's Alameda County Superior Court by John Liotine, a lead mechanic at the company's Oakland, Calif., maintenance facility. Liotine complained to the Federal Aviation Administration in late 1998 that the Seattle-based airline faked maintenance records.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 15, 2013 | By Victoria Kim and Kate Mather
In the wake of Asiana 214's crash-landing in San Francisco, there are surely myriad lawsuits to come - three passengers died, scores of others were injured, numerous flights were canceled and an aircraft was left gutted. But the first suit to be announced a week after the crash, though, wasn't over any of the injured passengers or wrecked equipment; it was over Asiana Airlines's reputation, which the company says was damaged when a Bay Area television aired bogus names of its pilots with racist undertones last week.
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NEWS
April 12, 1995 | JAMES F. PELTZ and STUART SILVERSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Two United Airlines pilots, one of them from Laguna Beach, said Tuesday that they have filed an employment discrimination lawsuit against the airline, alleging that United forbade them from flying because they have HIV, the virus that causes AIDS. Paul H. Rafalowski, 33, of Laguna Beach worked for the airline for nine years, piloting 737s in the continental United States before he was told to retire last June, said Peter F. Laura, a lawyer for both pilots in Beverly Hills.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 8, 2001 | JEAN GUCCIONE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
To limit its costs in two dozen lawsuits, Southwest Airlines is willing to concede that pilot negligence caused a 737 passenger jet last year to crash through a Burbank Airport fence and skid onto a street, according to the airline's attorney. But the lawyer, Christopher M. Young, denies new allegations by two of the plaintiffs that the pilots landed under dangerous conditions to keep Southwest flights on a tight schedule.
BUSINESS
December 1, 1998 | JAMES F. PELTZ and DAVAN MAHARAJ, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Passengers suing over injuries caused by beverage carts, falling luggage or other hazards aboard commercial jetliners got a major boost Monday by a federal appeals court. The U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals in San Francisco said passengers with personal-injury claims can go ahead and sue the airlines for negligence--without having their suits blocked by the Airline Deregulation Act. "I feel like I just scored a touchdown," said Stuart J.
NEWS
January 9, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
Passengers who spent eight hours on board a parked Northwest Airlines jet at Detroit Metropolitan Airport while snow blocked arrival gates have sued the company alleging negligence and forced imprisonment. Timothy and Susan Koczara, who filed the suit, were two of an estimated 4,000 passengers that Northwest kept trapped on 30 airplanes as water supplies ran out, toilets overflowed and panicked passengers threatened to activate emergency exits, attorney Larry Charfoos said.
BUSINESS
February 23, 1995 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Denver Sues Continental Airlines: The city and county of Denver filed suit against Houston-based Continental Airlines Inc., alleging violations of its lease terms at Denver International Airport, which opens Tuesday. Continental was the first airline to lease space at Denver International and it is now committed to lease 20 gates and pay fees based on a minimum of 6 million passengers annually for five years. The carrier maintains it will pay only for the gates it uses.
NEWS
January 19, 1995 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Air travelers who are irked by changes in their frequent-flier programs won the right Wednesday to sue the carriers for reneging on a promised benefit. In a 6-2 ruling, the Supreme Court said that the federal Airline Deregulation Act does not free the carriers from state lawsuits charging that they have breached a contract.
BUSINESS
October 13, 1994 | From Associated Press
About $400 million worth of discount airline coupons awarded in a price-fixing suit could be distributed to travelers in December if a judge OKs a final report on the processing of claims. Lawyers plan in the next few days to submit to U.S. District Judge Marvin H. Shoob a report on the yearlong processing of 4.3 million claims for the coupons. "We will ask for permission to print them and mail them out," said Ann Yahner, one of the attorneys representing travelers in the class-action case.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 25, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
A suit brought by an Arab American passenger in a 1999 American Airlines crash was settled Monday before it could go to trial in Little Rock, Ark. The action was filed by San Jose resident Mohammad Abdel Khaliq, a Muslim from Jordan who has been in the United States for 20 years. His attorney said the settlement was reached in part because of Abdel's fear that jurors would discriminate against him.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 24, 2001 | KARIMA A. HAYNES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
City Councilman Bob Kramer said Friday he has asked city officials to consider taking legal action against Southwest Airlines to recover expenses stemming from an incident last year when one of the airline's planes careened off a runway at Burbank Airport. The councilman has asked that the matter be placed on the agenda of the council's next regular meeting Tuesday. "We recognize that the airline pays taxes to the city to cover the cost of municipal services," he said.
NEWS
November 8, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
Alaska Airlines said it is arguing in federal court in San Francisco that international laws shield it from punitive damages sought by families of 88 people killed when Flight 261 crashed last January off the California coast. An airline spokesman said it would be willing to settle for 100% of the compensatory damages but did not think that punitive damages apply. Co-defendant Boeing Co. concurred.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 8, 2000 | DAVID ROSENZWEIG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Santa Monica man who survived the flaming crash of a Singapore Airlines jet in Taiwan last week filed suit in Los Angeles federal court Tuesday, blaming the pilot for the mishap. John Diaz, 50, an executive with the Internet music company MP3.com, is the first victim to sue over the crash that killed 82 people. Diaz charged in his complaint that the pilot of the Los Angeles-bound flight acted recklessly when he took off from a runway closed for reconstruction during a driving rainstorm.
NEWS
September 24, 2000 | From Associated Press
A whistle-blower at Alaska Airlines has filed a $20-million lawsuit accusing the carrier of defamation for allegedly portraying him on its Web site as incompetent. The lawsuit was filed in California's Alameda County Superior Court by John Liotine, a lead mechanic at the company's Oakland, Calif., maintenance facility. Liotine complained to the Federal Aviation Administration in late 1998 that the Seattle-based airline faked maintenance records.
BUSINESS
August 2, 2000 | Associated Press
AMR Corp.'s American Airlines said it has agreed to pay up to $500,000 to settle a government lawsuit claiming the airline engaged in discriminatory hiring practices. The agreement resolves a class-action lawsuit by the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission on behalf of people who applied for flight-attendant positions.
BUSINESS
March 18, 2000 | From Associated Press
As expected, nearly all major U.S. airlines on Friday matched fare increases launched by Northwest Airlines, boosting prices of a round-trip domestic ticket by about $40 for business travelers and $20 for leisure travelers who book ahead. Northwest announced its higher fares Thursday, and by late evening American Airlines, Continental Airlines, Delta Air Lines and United Airlines had boosted their fares.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 13, 2000 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, TIMES LEGAL AFFAIRS WRITER
The federal Equal Employment Opportunity Commission is investigating allegations that minority employees of American Airlines at Los Angeles International Airport are racially harassed, according to interviews and court documents. Citing agency rules, commission officials have declined to comment on the investigation, which has included numerous interviews of American employees and the subpoenas of records in a former employee's civil rights lawsuit against American.
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