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ENTERTAINMENT
March 19, 2014 | By David Horsey
CNN, enjoying a boost in ratings thanks to the public fascination with the mysterious disappearance of Malaysia Airlines Flight 370, has chosen to run with it and sharply limit coverage of other stories. This is not the first time a single incident has overtaken all other events on the cable news channel. Invasions and terrorist acts, monumental storms and political scandals have caused CNN to push everything else aside in the past. What is different about this story is that there are no scenes of disaster to show, no military convoys to follow, no shameful confessions to broadcast, little actual news to report.
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BUSINESS
March 19, 2014 | By Hugo Martin
The merger of American Airlines and US Airways was unusual when it was proposed last year because it seemed to have the support of all the major employee unions involved. But one of the biggest unions for US Airways is threatening to strike, and the group now has the support of its union brothers from American Airlines. The International Assn. of Machinists and Aerospace Workers -- which represents about 14,000 US Airways machinists, mechanics and fleet service workers -- has been trying to negotiate a new contract with US Airways for more than two years.
NEWS
March 19, 2014 | By Mary Forgione, Daily Deal and Travel Blogger
Members of selected loyalty programs at Alaska Airlines, American Airlines, Delta Air Lines, Southwest Airlines, United Airlines and US Airways will receive free entry to JetBlue's premium TrueBlue Mosaic club for the rest of 2014 just by signing up. The offer is part of the TrueBlue Mosaic Challenge that kicked off Tuesday and rewards fliers who rack up 3,750 flight points in 90 days. Clearly, JetBlue is out to boost its Mosaic club status numbers, and it's not the first time the airline has made this offer.
BUSINESS
March 16, 2014 | By Hugo Martin
Saudi Arabian Airline is scheduled to begin new service from Los Angeles International Airport to Saudi Arabia later this month, an occasion that is customarily celebrated with an elaborate ceremony on the tarmac and in the terminal. For example, when Emirates Airline debuted in December daily service between LAX and Dubai, the airlines taxied the A380 plane to the gate under a shower of water from the airport fire trucks' water cannons. But with California in its worst drought in modern times, LAX officials told Saudi Arabian Airline that they'll have to make do without the water cannons for the celebration of the new service.
BUSINESS
March 16, 2014 | By Hugo Martin
Legislation that would let airlines advertise fares without adding in fees and taxes has the support of - you guessed it - the nation's airline industry. The bill introduced March 6 by Rep. Bill Shuster (R-Pa.) and Peter DeFazio (D-Ore.) would negate a rule adopted in 2011 by the U.S. Department of Transportation that requires airlines to advertise the full cost of tickets, including fees and taxes. The Department of Transportation has already fined the nation's airlines thousand of dollars over the last three years for violating the so-called full-fare advertising rule.
WORLD
March 16, 2014 | By Barbara Demick
The possibility that Malaysia Air Flight 370 was hijacked has heartened the relatives of passengers who are holding out hope that the missing plane landed in some remote location, perhaps a tropical island. "My gut feeling is that it landed. I still feel his spirit. I don't feel he is dead," said Sarah Bajc, a 48-year-old American teacher living in Beijing whose partner, Philip Wood, a 50-year-old IBM executive, was a passenger on the flight. A former technology executive, Bajc has been one of the most proactive of the family members, setting up Facebook and Twitter accounts encouraging people to keep looking for the plane.
WORLD
March 16, 2014 | By Barbara Demick
BEIJING - The search for missing Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 has expanded to cover an impossibly vast swath of Asia extending from Kazakhstan to Australia, with Malaysia appealing for as many airplanes and ships as the world can provide. The countries where the Boeing 777 and the 239 people aboard could have gone, based on a signal picked up by a satellite, stretch north and west from the plane's last known location and include Kazakhstan, Uzbekistan, Pakistan, Bangladesh, India, China, Myanmar, Laos, Vietnam and Thailand.
WORLD
March 15, 2014 | By Barbara Demick
BEIJING - Like an Agatha Christie whodunit, the investigation of the disappearance of Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 is now focusing on a finite circle of suspects: the 227 passengers and 12 crew members of the missing plane. While loath to call it a hijacking, Malaysian officials say they believe someone on the plane with expertise in the navigational and communications systems of the Boeing 777 diverted it from its Kuala Lumpur-to-Beijing flight path. "In view of this latest development, Malaysian authorities have refocused their investigation into the crew and passengers on board," Malaysian Prime Minister Najib Razak said at a news conference Saturday.
WORLD
March 14, 2014 | By Richard A. Serrano and W.J. Hennigan
WASHINGTON - A week after one of the most advanced commercial aircraft ever built vanished with 239 people aboard, an international effort involving fleets of ships, planes and satellites appears to be chasing fragmentary data and theories centered on a potentially longer flight far west of the jet's intended destination. As Saturday dawned in Asia, that search had veered more decisively into new areas: U.S. ships are concentrating on waters west of Malaysia, where the Boeing 777 flight originated, while investigators sought to determine why onboard transponders had apparently been turned off manually.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 13, 2014 | By Dan Weikel
An airline services company at Los Angeles International Airport has won a court victory in a longstanding battle with a labor union fighting to regain its representation of the firm's workers. Aviation Safeguards announced Thursday that U.S. District Judge Stephen Wilson threw out a lawsuit filed in July 2012 by several company workers and United Service Workers West, a local of the Service Employees International Union. The case accused company managers of coercing their employees' choice of union representation before a majority of workers voted to terminate an SEIU contract in December 2011.
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