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May 13, 1996 | ANNA M. VIRTUE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The passengers aboard ValuJet Flight 592 were on business and on vacation, from urban areas such as Miami and from towns such as Powder Springs, Ga. Many were headed home or to Mother's Day reunions with family. All thought their next stop would be Atlanta. Now, as federal officials tackle the difficult task of retrieving the bodies from a watery Everglades grave, the friends and relatives of the 109 people aboard the doomed jetliner can only hope for closure.
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NEWS
January 7, 2002 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was a lonely and despondent 15-year-old, feeling sympathy for accused terrorist mastermind Osama bin Laden, who stole a private plane and slammed it into a Tampa skyscraper, authorities said Sunday. A brief handwritten note found in the pocket of student pilot Charles J. Bishop, who died in the Saturday crash, strongly implied that the high school freshman was inspired by the terrorist attacks on the World Trade Center and the Pentagon.
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NEWS
May 14, 1996 | ERIC MALNIC, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A sharpshooter watching for alligators guarded divers in a steamy Everglades marsh on Monday as they recovered fragmented human remains and a "black box" recording device from the crash of ValuJet flight 592. "This is tough stuff out there," said National Transportation Safety Board Vice Chairman Robert Francis, who is heading the investigation of the crash that killed all 109 aboard the DC-9 jetliner Saturday afternoon.
NEWS
January 6, 2002 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG and JOSH MEYER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In an episode joltingly reminiscent of the Sept. 11 terrorism attacks, a 15-year-old student pilot stole a small single-engine airplane Saturday and flew it into a downtown office building in Tampa, Fla., killing himself and damaging the 40-story structure. Given the nationwide security alerts in recent weeks and the similarity to the events of Sept.
SPORTS
May 14, 1996 | T.J. SIMERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The picture has been there for the last five years, amid the ever-changing kindergarten art that adorns Kelly Kruse's refrigerator door. Kind of strange, really, as Kruse now admits, but the frozen moment from a postgame reception at the University of Notre Dame features Kelly and her sister Laura with their arms draped over the solid shoulders of football player Rodney Culver.
NEWS
May 14, 1996 | JESSE KATZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Candalyn Kubeck never would have wanted to be remembered this way. An avid flier, whose grandfather piloted biplanes in the 1920s, she began taking lessons as a teenager, eventually logging nearly 9,000 hours in the air. By the time she was hired by ValuJet in 1993, she believed that her accomplishments spoke for themselves, regardless of the fact that she was among that rare 2.5% of commercial pilots who just happen not to be male.
NEWS
July 7, 1996 | BILL KACZOR, ASSOCIATED PRESS
A Delta jet engine blew apart and ripped into the cabin packed with holiday travelers as the plane sped down a runway Saturday, killing a mother and son and forcing the pilot to abort takeoff. Delta Flight 1288 was headed to Atlanta carrying its capacity of 142 passengers and five crew members, said Kathleen Bergen, spokeswoman for the Federal Aviation Administration in Atlanta. In addition to the fatalities, seven people were injured, at least one seriously.
NEWS
October 31, 1989 | From Associated Press
A Navy pilot making his first landing attempt on an aircraft carrier was "low and slow" before his training jet crashed on the Lexington, killing him and four others, the ship's captain said Monday. The T-2 Buckeye slammed into the ship's island, cartwheeled across the deck and exploded in flames Sunday afternoon, Capt. C. Flack Logan said. Nineteen other people were injured. The pilot, Ens. Steven E. Pontell, 23, of Columbia, Md., was the only one aboard the two-seat trainer.
NEWS
May 25, 1996 | MIKE CLARY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Two weeks after 110 people perished when ValuJet Flight 592 plunged into the Everglades, eight victims have been identified from fragmented remains recovered at the crash site. Using tattoos, scars, fingerprints, dental records and clothing described by relatives, Dade County Medical Examiner Roger E. Mittleman said Friday that he has been able to identify eight adults among the 105 passengers on the DC-9. The jetliner carried a crew of five.
NEWS
July 26, 1996 | From Times Wire Services
Fifty-three coffins bearing the unidentified remains of people killed when ValuJet Flight 592 plunged into the Everglades will be buried next week in adjoining plots marked with a bronze plaque, officials said Thursday. All 110 people on the flight died when the jetliner crashed May 11. Only 57 bodies have been identified, and the 53 coffins represent one for each remaining victim.
NEWS
August 11, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
A couple who chartered a small plane on the pretext of having sex in the sky died when the plane plunged into the sea off the Florida Keys after they tried to hijack it to Cuba, U.S. authorities said. The unidentified couple scuffled with the pilot when the Piper Cherokee was about 40 miles south of Key West, sending the small plane plunging into the Florida Straits between Key West and Cuba, the pilot told agents investigating the alleged hijacking attempt.
NEWS
May 23, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
Defunct aircraft maintenance contractor SabreTech Inc. agreed to pay a record $1.75-million penalty to settle allegations it violated hazardous-materials rules in the fiery 1996 ValuJet crash that killed 110 people in the Everglades, federal regulators said in Miami. As part of the settlement, the Federal Aviation Administration agreed to drop 10 of its 37 allegations that SabreTech violated Department of Transportation rules governing the handling of hazardous materials.
NEWS
November 29, 2000 | ERIC MALNIC, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Offering little to better explain the mysterious plane crash 13 months ago that killed golfer Payne Stewart and five others, federal investigators on Tuesday confirmed long-held suspicions that the accident probably was caused by a loss of cabin pressurization. National Transportation Safety Board investigators had said privately for months that the Learjet 35 apparently depressurized as it reached 39,000 feet after taking off from Orlando, Fla., on Oct. 25, 1999, on a planned flight to Texas.
NEWS
November 21, 2000 | From Associated Press
An American Airlines flight attendant preparing to disembark passengers after an emergency landing Monday was killed when he opened a door before the plane depressurized, authorities said. Jose Chiu "was basically sucked out" onto the tarmac, said Nelda Fonticiella, a spokeswoman for the Miami-Dade County Police Department. It was unknown whether the jet had stopped before the door was opened. Chiu, 34, was a 10-year employee based in New York.
NEWS
November 19, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
An Air Force F-16 involved in a fatal collision with a small plane was flying too fast at 480 mph and had not contacted air traffic controllers, federal authorities in Bradenton, Fla., said. It was one of two F-16Cs that descended east of Tampa International Airport last week. The pilot of the small private plane was killed when it was hit by one of the jets. The fighter pilot maneuvered his plane away from populated areas and parachuted to safety.
NEWS
June 24, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
Two small planes collided over a residential community in southeast Florida, near Boca Raton, killing all four people aboard, police said. Witnesses saw a red fireball and then a thick cloud of black smoke from the crash, which scattered debris over nearly a mile in Boca Raton. Part of the wreckage crashed into a condominium building, but the Palm Beach County Sheriff's Office said there were no injuries or deaths on the ground.
NEWS
May 26, 1997 | From Associated Press
A skydiver who felt her plane spinning out of control managed to leap to safety Sunday, moments before the craft spiraled and crashed in a sweet potato field, killing the pilot and five other people. An investigator said the plane, which was built for four people but carrying seven, could have been overloaded with too much weight. The woman jumped to safety just as the plane went into its fatal spin, her parachute canopy still opening as the Cessna went down.
NEWS
March 17, 1996 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The Navy searched waters off Puerto Rico for two pilots whose plane crashed during a routine exercise. Both men were presumed dead. The S-3 Viking plane piloted by Lts. Thomas P. Wilcox III and Donald R. Cioffi crashed shortly after takeoff from the aircraft carrier John C. Stennis on Friday night, naval officials said. The Stennis, the Navy's newest aircraft carrier, is on a seven-week training exercise in the Caribbean with a crew of 4,500. The S-3 Viking was on an in-flight refueling mission.
NEWS
December 7, 1999 | MIKE CLARY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A federal jury on Monday found an airline-maintenance company guilty of nine hazardous-materials violations in connection with the handling of oxygen containers blamed for the 1996 crash of ValuJet Flight 592, which killed 110 people. SabreTech was cleared of the more serious charges of conspiracy and causing a destructive device to be put aboard an airplane. The firm--which no longer exists as such--faces possible fines of up to $2.
NEWS
November 30, 1999
Prosecutors rested their case Monday in the criminal conspiracy trial stemming from the 1996 crash of a ValuJet DC-9 that killed 110 people, prompting requests by the defense to end the trial for lack of evidence. Nearly two dozen prosecution witnesses have testified since a jury was chosen Nov. 15 to hear the first criminal trial arising from the crash.
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