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Airplane Accidents Hawaii

NEWS
June 1, 1988 | Associated Press
The Boeing 737 that disintegrated and crashed over Taiwan in 1981 and another one that lost part of its fuselage over Hawaii in April were built back to back, but Boeing executives Tuesday attributed any similarities to coincidence. The Far Eastern Air Transport 737-200 jet that broke up at 22,000 feet over central Taiwan on Aug. 22, 1981, killing all 110 people on board, was the 151st produced. No.
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NEWS
December 3, 1988 | United Press International
A Hawaiian Airlines DC-9 with 117 passengers on board lost part of an engine shortly after takeoff Friday, and falling pieces of metal shattered windshields and pierced the roofs of cars parked below, authorities said. No injuries were reported, and the twin-engine plane returned safely to Honolulu International Airport, where the passengers transferred to a different aircraft and resumed their flight, spokesman Keoni Wagner said. Tony Robella, security manager for Matson Navigation Co.
NEWS
February 27, 1989 | ERIC MALNIC and DENISE GELLENE, Times Staff Writers
Federal investigators continued to focus on the apparent failure of a cargo door on a United Airlines Boeing 747 but conceded that they still have no hard evidence as to how that door might have malfunctioned, causing it to rip loose in the air near Hawaii and hurl nine people to their deaths. However, Lee V.
NEWS
October 3, 1990 | Associated Press
A submarine has retrieved the top half of the cargo door that ripped away from a United Airlines jet last year, sweeping nine people to their deaths, a Navy spokeswoman said Tuesday. The discovery ends a needle-in-a-haystack search of the Pacific Ocean floor. The three-man mini-sub and its support ship recovered the bottom half of the door last week.
NEWS
September 28, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A Navy deap-sea submarine searching the floor of the Pacific Ocean recovered part of the cargo door that last year tore away from a United Airlines jetliner, sweeping nine people to their deaths. National Transportation Safety Board officials said a preliminary examination showed that the Boeing 747 door had fractured longitudinally near the midspan latch. The piece was found late Wednesday in 14,100 feet of water 90 miles south-southwest of Honolulu, said a U.S. Pacific Fleet spokeswoman.
NEWS
April 24, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Searchers found the wreckage of a sightseeing plane that crashed with nine people aboard in a lava field near the summit of a dormant volcano. An official with Scenic Air Tours Hawaii said the plane went down far off course. When it crashed, the plane was flying the last leg of a daylong, four-island excursion, a 250-mile trip from Hilo on Hawaii Island to Honolulu on Oahu, said Rob Jackson, the tour company's director of operations.
NEWS
October 28, 1988 | From the Washington Post
The Federal Aviation Administration on Thursday ordered the replacement of 7,200 rivets in every older Boeing 737 jetliner to guard against a possible repeat of an accident last spring in which an Aloha Airlines jet lost a third of its roof in flight. The far-reaching and costly order affects the 291 oldest Boeing jets and requires that the work be completed within three years.
NEWS
April 30, 1988 | OSWALD JOHNSTON and RICHARD E. MEYER, Times Staff Writers
The federal government ordered the inspection of old Boeing 737s late last year for cracks in the portion of the upper fuselage where a 19-year-old Aloha Airlines jetliner ripped open in the sky southeast of Maui, officials said Friday. The Federal Aviation Administration also ordered a lower-fuselage inspection of the nation's entire Boeing 737 fleet in 1982, the officials said. That directive was prompted by the possibility of corrosion, which weakens the fuselage skin.
NEWS
March 4, 1989 | From the Washington Post
In the wake of last week's accident in which a cargo door blew off a United Airlines jumbo jet over the Pacific, the government Friday ordered the door latches on older 747s to be strengthened within 30 days. The Federal Aviation Administration had ordered the modification July 1 but had given the airlines up to two years to complete the work. "The situation changed when the door came off the United plane," FAA spokesman Bob Buckhorn said. "That obviously called for an immediate review."
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