Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsAirplane Accidents Michigan
IN THE NEWS

Airplane Accidents Michigan

NEWS
August 28, 1998 | ERIC MALNIC, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The nation's top safety officials leveled another blast at the Federal Aviation Administration on Thursday, blaming it for last year's fatal crash of a Comair commuter plane during a snowstorm near Detroit. The report focused on procedures for aircraft in icing conditions.
Advertisement
NEWS
September 8, 1987 | United Press International
The Detroit plane crash that killed 156 people last month--the second-worst disaster in U.S. aviation history--might have been prevented if a simple cockpit safety checklist had been in the plane, the manufacturer of the checklist said. Steve Meginnis, executive vice president of the Dexter-Wilson Corp., a Seattle firm that makes cockpit components and aircraft wiring, said he repeatedly has tried to interest air carriers in equipping commercial jets with his "mechanical lighted checklist."
NEWS
January 18, 1997 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Moments before a Comair commuter plane plunged into a snowy field, killing all 29 people aboard, controllers asked the pilots to slow down so a jetliner could pass overhead, the maker of the smaller aircraft said. While investigators refused to comment on the report, it bolsters the theory that the twin-engine turboprop Embraer 120 was accumulating ice on its wings and was going too slowly to stay aloft under such conditions.
NEWS
January 15, 1997 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The right engine of the Comair twin-engine turboprop that crashed in a snowstorm had been replaced five days earlier during regularly scheduled maintenance, the company said. Comair Inc. spokeswoman Meghan Glynn said the replacement was not a factor in the crash. All 29 people aboard Comair Flight 3272 died last week when the Embraer 120 nose-dived into a field 18 miles from Detroit Metropolitan Airport.
NEWS
October 21, 1988 | Associated Press
The Federal Aviation Administration, after finding several takeoff alarm systems not working properly, on Thursday ordered the warning devices tested on nearly 1,800 Boeing 727 and Boeing 737 jetliners. The action, prompted in part by two fatal airline crashes, requires the tests to be conducted within 200 flight hours and repeated every 200 flight hours to make certain that pilots are warned if their planes are not properly configured to take off.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|