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Airplane Accidents Michigan

NEWS
May 9, 1991 | From Associated Press
Northwest Airlines pilots were responsible for the 1987 jet crash that killed 156 people, the second-worst death toll in U.S. history, and the airline bears full liability, a federal jury ruled Wednesday. The jury absolved McDonnell Douglas Corp. of blame, rejecting Northwest's arguments that the maker of the MD-80 jetliner supplied faulty equipment. Northwest said it would appeal. Northwest Flight 255 was bound for Phoenix on Aug. 16, 1987, when it barely lifted off.
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NEWS
May 22, 1997 | ERIC MALNIC, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Reinforcing suspicions that an accumulation of ice and inadequate pilot response may have caused January's crash of an Embraer 120 commuter plane near Detroit, federal officials on Wednesday called for changes in procedures followed by pilots flying the planes in icing conditions. Comair's Flight 3272--flying as part of the Delta Connection--rolled unsteadily and then crashed nose down into a cornfield in Raisinville Township as it approached Detroit's Metropolitan Airport during a snowstorm.
NEWS
March 6, 1987 | JAMES RISEN, Times Staff Writer
The cause of Wednesday's crash of a twin-engine commuter plane that nearly plowed into a crowded terminal building at Detroit's Metropolitan Airport remained a mystery Thursday, and federal officials said their investigation was being hampered by the fact that the aircraft was not equipped with a cockpit voice recorder.
NEWS
March 21, 1991 | ERIC MALNIC, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A federal official's concerns about "an inordinate number of pilot-induced safety infractions" at Northwest Airlines in the months before a runway collision between two of the airline's jets were aired here Wednesday at a hearing about the accident.
NEWS
August 18, 1987 | LARRY GREEN and JOHN BRODER, Times Staff Writers
Investigators searching for a cause of Sunday night's deadly crash of Northwest Airlines Flight 255 as it left Detroit's Metropolitan Airport focused on the plane's engines Monday. Bound for Phoenix and Orange County's John Wayne Airport, the twin-engine MD-80 crashed seconds after takeoff just beyond the perimeter of the airport, killing as many as 156 people, two of them on the ground.
NEWS
August 18, 1987 | LARRY GREEN, Times Staff Writer
Yellow sheets, like confetti thrown helter-skelter, lay Monday along the scorched, nearly mile-long path of destruction left by Sunday night's crash of Northwest Airlines Flight 255 as it attempted to take off from Detroit Metropolitan Airport. They covered bodies and parts of bodies--most burned beyond recognition--of as many as 156 people who died in the second-worst single plane crash in U.S. history.
NEWS
August 17, 1987 | JAMES RISEN and LARRY GREEN, Times Staff Writers
A Northwest Airlines jetliner with 153 people on board crashed in a giant fireball on a busy highway Sunday night as it was taking off from Detroit Metropolitan Airport bound for Phoenix and Orange County's John Wayne Airport. Wayne County Executive Edward McNamara said that six people on the ground were injured, but he believes everyone aboard the twin-engine jet perished.
NEWS
December 7, 1990 | From United Press International
A pilot who strayed into a collision that killed eight people on a fog-bound runway was not alone in becoming confused when taxiing at Detroit Metropolitan Airport, a federal investigator said Thursday. "We have had reports from some of the pilots who were interviewed who also said there had been confusion in the past, and not necessarily in low-visibility conditions," said John Lauber, who heads a National Transportation Safety Board investigation of Monday's crash.
NEWS
August 19, 1987 | ERIC MALNIC and LARRY GREEN, Times Staff Writers
Federal investigators indicated Tuesday that a weather phenomenon known as wind shear may have contributed to the fatal crash of Northwest Airlines Flight 255. John Lauber, the National Transportation Safety Board member who is heading the inquiry, said that alerting systems at Detroit's Metropolitan Airport sounded several warnings of wind-shear conditions 20 to 30 minutes before the crash.
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