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Airplane Accidents New Hampshire

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NEWS
January 22, 1997 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A mother and son who died in the crash of their small plane had passed out from carbon monoxide fumes that probably seeped into the cockpit from a hole in the muffler, investigators said in Concord, N.H. Pilot David Riach, 46, and his mother, Dorothy Riach, 71, were comatose but alive as their single-engine plane soared over three states last Friday, said James Kaplan, acting New Hampshire medical examiner. The plane eventually ran out of gas and crashed.
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NEWS
August 27, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
A single-engine plane that appeared to have been deliberately crashed into an Amherst home was licensed by the homeowner's company. The pilot, the plane's only occupant, was killed. The home, unoccupied at the time of the crash, was destroyed. No one on the ground was injured. The plane was registered to a company founded by Louis W. Joy III, 43, an author, lecturer and licensed pilot who had recently moved to the home with his wife and daughter.
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NEWS
January 18, 1997 | Associated Press
A woman forced to take control of a small plane after her pilot son passed out from carbon monoxide apparently was also overcome as the plane passed over three states. The plane crashed and both died. The two-hour drama began in Connecticut and continued in the skies over Massachusetts and New Hampshire. Air traffic controllers coached the increasingly groggy passenger, and a private pilot spotted the plane, established radio contract and tried to give her instructions.
NEWS
January 22, 1997 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A mother and son who died in the crash of their small plane had passed out from carbon monoxide fumes that probably seeped into the cockpit from a hole in the muffler, investigators said in Concord, N.H. Pilot David Riach, 46, and his mother, Dorothy Riach, 71, were comatose but alive as their single-engine plane soared over three states last Friday, said James Kaplan, acting New Hampshire medical examiner. The plane eventually ran out of gas and crashed.
NEWS
June 27, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A stunt plane crashed and exploded at an air show in Concord, killing a father-daughter wing walking act, authorities said. Several thousand spectators saw the crash at Concord Airport, but nobody in the crowd was hurt when the plane came down several hundred yards away. Witnesses said the plane came out of a roll at about 100 feet when something went wrong.
NEWS
August 27, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
A single-engine plane that appeared to have been deliberately crashed into an Amherst home was licensed by the homeowner's company. The pilot, the plane's only occupant, was killed. The home, unoccupied at the time of the crash, was destroyed. No one on the ground was injured. The plane was registered to a company founded by Louis W. Joy III, 43, an author, lecturer and licensed pilot who had recently moved to the home with his wife and daughter.
NEWS
January 18, 1997 | Associated Press
A woman forced to take control of a small plane after her pilot son passed out from carbon monoxide apparently was also overcome as the plane passed over three states. The plane crashed and both died. The two-hour drama began in Connecticut and continued in the skies over Massachusetts and New Hampshire. Air traffic controllers coached the increasingly groggy passenger, and a private pilot spotted the plane, established radio contract and tried to give her instructions.
NEWS
June 27, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A stunt plane crashed and exploded at an air show in Concord, killing a father-daughter wing walking act, authorities said. Several thousand spectators saw the crash at Concord Airport, but nobody in the crowd was hurt when the plane came down several hundred yards away. Witnesses said the plane came out of a roll at about 100 feet when something went wrong.
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