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Airplane Accidents New York State

NEWS
March 25, 1992 | ERIC MALNIC, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Eighteen of the 27 people who died in the crash of a USAir commuter jet Sunday night drowned after the plane veered off a runway at La Guardia Airport during a snowstorm and tumbled into Flushing Bay, the New York Medical Examiner's office said Tuesday. Four died from burns, four died from impact injuries and one died from a combination of all three causes, the office reported.
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NEWS
May 1, 1991 | From Associated Press
Mistakes by the flight crew were the chief reason that a Colombian jetliner ran out of fuel and crashed on Long Island last year, killing 73 people, the National Transportation Safety Board ruled Tuesday. The crew of Avianca Flight 52 failed to impress air traffic controllers that its fuel had run critically low on the evening of Jan. 25, 1990, the board concluded.
NEWS
July 28, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Avianca Airlines announced it was willing to pay $75,000 each to survivors or relatives of victims of the crash of Flight 52 without requiring them to relinquish their rights to further claims. Seventy-three people died and 85 were injured in the Jan. 25 crash of the Boeing 707 on Long Island during an approach to Kennedy Airport after a flight from Colombia. Under the Avianca proposal, made during a hearing before U.S. District Judge Thomas C.
NEWS
April 12, 1990 | Associated Press
The captain and co-pilot of a USAir jetliner that crashed at La Guardia Airport last year can fly again if they pass recertification tests, the pilots and the Federal Aviation Administration have agreed. The FAA had revoked the captain's license of Capt. Michael Martin and suspended the license of co-pilot Constantine Kleissas, who was at the controls before their Boeing 737 slid off a runway Sept. 20, killing two.
NEWS
March 28, 1990 | JASON B. JOHNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A communication breakdown between flight crew members and air traffic controllers appears to have contributed to the Jan. 25 crash of Avianca Flight 52 into a hillside in Cove Neck, N.Y., according to a transcript released Tuesday. The 68-page transcript of the final 40 minutes of crew conversation, issued by the National Transportation Safety Board, indicates that the plane's co-pilot failed to convey the seriousness of the plane's low fuel situation to ground controllers.
NEWS
February 26, 1990 | Associated Press
A 1,000-car caravan at John F. Kennedy International Airport on Sunday protested the handling of Avianca Flight 52, which crashed about 25 miles away. They carried signs with the names of the 73 people killed and criticisms of air traffic controllers.
NEWS
February 22, 1990 | From Associated Press
Federal safety officials on Wednesday urged pilots and air traffic controllers to make sure they clearly understand each other when dealing with low-fuel emergencies to help avoid crashes like the one that killed 73 people in New York last month. The National Transportation Safety Board, in an emergency recommendation arising out of the crash of Avianca Flight 52, said miscommunication between the flight crew and air controllers figured in the Jan. 25 crash.
NEWS
February 8, 1990 | THOMAS B. ROSENSTIEL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The crash of an Avianca Airlines jetliner near New York's Kennedy Airport was the nation's most closely followed news story in January, but no story gained an overwhelming share of America's attention during the month, according to the latest Times Mirror News Interest Index, released today.
NEWS
February 3, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Authorities said the FBI has been informed by Colombian officials that Antonio Zuluaga, a survivor of the Avianca Flight 52 crash who was charged with smuggling cocaine concealed in his intestinal tract, may also be a hit man for the Medellin drug cartel. Zuluaga, 46, was arraigned on felony drug possession charges and ordered held without bail at a hearing in the Nassau County Medical Center's prison ward, where he remained in satisfactory condition.
NEWS
January 30, 1990 | DENISE GELLENE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The deaths of four children and one infant in last Thursday's crash of Avianca Airlines Flight 52 in New York is expected to fuel the debate over child safety on airliners. The Federal Aviation Administration allows children under age 2 to sit on adults' laps and fly free, but safety experts contend that children who do so are not safe. Child safety advocates want the FAA to mandate the use of child safety seats on airliners, but it appears unlikely that the agency will do so.
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