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Airplane Accidents North Carolina

NEWS
December 14, 1994 | From Associated Press
Tuesday evening's crash of an American Eagle propjet on a short flight from Greensboro to Raleigh, N.C., is the latest in a series of setbacks for the newly beleaguered commuter airline industry. The last two months have not been good ones for a segment of the transportation industry that until recently has enjoyed spectacular growth with deregulation. Last year, commuter planes carried some 50 million customers.
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NEWS
December 14, 1994 | ROBERT L. JACKSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An American Eagle commuter plane with 20 people aboard crashed and split open Tuesday evening in a rugged, wooded area about four miles from Raleigh-Durham International Airport, killing 15 people. Thirteen people died at the scene and two shortly after arrival at Duke University Medical Center, authorities said. The five survivors were hospitalized and two of them had extensive injuries, a hospital official said.
NEWS
September 23, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A USAir jet crash during a thunderstorm in Charlotte in July could have been avoided if the pilots had used proper landing procedures for violent wind shifts, said an engineer with the maker of the jet. Flight 1016 crashed into the woods on July 2 after the aircraft aborted a landing during a thunderstorm, killing 37 of the 57 people on board. William Rickard of the aerodynamics-acoustics unit of Douglas Aircraft Co.
NEWS
September 22, 1994 | ERIC MALNIC, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Inspections conducted last May--before USAir's two most recent crashes--revealed that the airline's pilots were not always following prescribed cockpit procedures, a Federal Aviation Administration official testified here Wednesday.
NEWS
September 21, 1994 | ERIC MALNIC, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"We just dropped," USAir Capt. Michael Greenlee recalled Tuesday. "It was like having the rug pulled out from under you . . . . I looked out, and I'm looking up at trees and a small hill." Seconds later, Greenlee's DC-9 jetliner--apparently caught in fierce, shifting winds generated by a thunderstorm--slammed into the ground, broke into three pieces and burst into flames, killing 37 of the 57 people on board.
NEWS
September 20, 1994 | ERIC MALNIC, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Documents filed in the investigation of the USAir crash here last July raise questions about the response of the pilots to a wind-shear condition that apparently hurled the DC-9 to the ground, killing 37 of the 57 aboard. While mystery still shrouds the causes of the more recent USAir crash in Pittsburgh, Pa.
NEWS
August 30, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The pilots of USAir Flight 1016 missed a wind-shear warning for Charlotte-Douglas International airport seconds before the DC-9 crashed and killed 37 passengers, tapes revealed. While approaching the airport in a driving rainstorm July 2, the crew had switched from one tower radio frequency to another shortly before the warning was issued, said Phil Loftin, manager of the air traffic control tower. Twenty people, including Capt. Michael Greenlee and First Officer James Hayes, survived.
NEWS
July 6, 1994 | From Associated Press
The captain and first officer who survived the crash of a USAir flight told investigators on Tuesday that they tried to avoid storm pockets as they landed the plane and did not hear an on-board alarm warning of a dangerous wind shear. Capt. Michael R. Greenlee and First Officer James Hayes were "cooperative and very helpful" in separate interviews with National Transportation Safety Board investigators, said John Hammerschmidt, an NTSB board member.
NEWS
July 5, 1994 | ERIC MALNIC, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A powerful thunderstorm--and the violent, shearing wind that it may have spawned--were prime suspects Monday as several investigators probed the charred wreckage for clues on why a USAir jetliner crashed Saturday night, killing 37 of the 57 people aboard. It was typically hot, muggy weather here on the Fourth of July, and the going was slow and tedious for the two dozen specialists brought in by the National Transportation Safety Board to study the crash.
NEWS
July 4, 1994 | ERIC MALNIC, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The death toll climbed to 37 Sunday as federal officials finished the grim task of extracting bodies from the wreckage of a USAir jetliner that crashed here Saturday night. The other 20 people aboard the plane remained hospitalized Sunday with injuries ranging from superficial to critical. The DC-9 jet carrying 52 passengers and a crew of five on Flight 1016 from Columbia, S.C.
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