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Airplane Accidents Saudi Arabia

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NEWS
February 4, 1991 | J. MICHAEL KENNEDY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Six U.S. helicopter crewmen were killed in two separate crashes, and three airmen were reported missing after their B-52 crashed into the Indian Ocean while returning from a bombing run over Iraq, U.S. military officials said Sunday. Also Sunday, Marine officials said seven of the 11 Leathernecks killed in a light armored vehicle last week and another Marine killed in a cluster-bomb attack Saturday were victims of so-called friendly fire.
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NEWS
August 30, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Nationair Canada, owner of an aircraft that crashed July 11 in Saudi Arabia, killing all 261 on board, said the accident was apparently caused by a chain of events started by a flat tire. Nationair President Robert Obadia said that the tire, checked the previous night, was probably punctured by debris as the plane taxied at Jidda's airport. As the plane accelerated for takeoff, friction set the wheel rim ablaze and the fire was carried into the aircraft when the landing gear was retracted.
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NEWS
October 1, 1990 | Associated Press
Two Air Force pilots killed Sunday in the crash of an F-15 fighter plane during an exercise in Saudi Arabia were identified as California men, the U.S. military command said. The victims were identified as Maj. Peter S. Hook of Bishop and Capt. James B. Poulet of San Carlos, said Maj. Dan Schmidt, a spokesman for the Air Force Central Command in Saudi Arabia.
NEWS
July 12, 1991 | From Associated Press
A DC-8 jetliner carrying Nigerian pilgrims and a mostly Canadian crew crashed in flames Thursday while attempting to make an emergency landing, witnesses said. There were no survivors among at least 261 people on board. Bodies of the pilgrims were scattered across the Saudi desert after the plane nose-dived onto the tarmac and exploded shortly after takeoff, airport officials and the witnesses said. The number of people aboard the plane was in dispute.
NEWS
October 11, 1990 | DOUGLAS JEHL and JOHN M. BRODER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A series of after-dark crashes of U.S. military aircraft has exposed unanticipated problems in desert navigation, prompting some commanders to question whether pilots are fully prepared for possible night combat, according to military officials. The ability of U.S. pilots to wage war unrestrained by darkness was considered to be one of the United States' signal advantages over Iraqi forces. Most U.S.
NEWS
September 4, 1990 | Reuters
A U.S. Air Force F-16 involved in the buildup in the Persian Gulf crashed Monday during a routine training mission in Saudi Arabia, the Pentagon said. A spokeswoman said the pilot ejected and was unhurt in the accident.
NEWS
July 12, 1991 | From Associated Press
A DC-8 jetliner carrying Nigerian pilgrims and a mostly Canadian crew crashed in flames Thursday while attempting to make an emergency landing, witnesses said. There were no survivors among at least 261 people on board. Bodies of the pilgrims were scattered across the Saudi desert after the plane nose-dived onto the tarmac and exploded shortly after takeoff, airport officials and the witnesses said. The number of people aboard the plane was in dispute.
NEWS
August 30, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Nationair Canada, owner of an aircraft that crashed July 11 in Saudi Arabia, killing all 261 on board, said the accident was apparently caused by a chain of events started by a flat tire. Nationair President Robert Obadia said that the tire, checked the previous night, was probably punctured by debris as the plane taxied at Jidda's airport. As the plane accelerated for takeoff, friction set the wheel rim ablaze and the fire was carried into the aircraft when the landing gear was retracted.
NEWS
February 5, 1991 | Reuters
The Defense Department on Monday identified seven American servicemen who were killed in two separate air crashes Sunday during Gulf War missions. Three were Air Force officers killed when their B-52 crashed in the Indian Ocean near Diego Garcia when they were returning from a bombing mission. They were Capt. Jeffry Jon Olson, 27, of Grand Forks, N.D.; 1st Lt. Eric D. Hedeen, 27, of Malaga, Wash., and 1st. Lt. Jorge I. Arteaga of Trumbull, Conn. The three other crew members were rescued.
NEWS
October 9, 1990 | DOUGLAS JEHL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ten American servicemen were believed killed in the crashes of three military aircraft Monday in the worst day of casualties in the region since the U.S. military buildup began in Saudi Arabia. Among the missing were eight Camp Pendleton-based Marines whose two Huey helicopters vanished abruptly from radar screens on a night mission over the Arabian Sea.
NEWS
March 22, 1991 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Complying with a cease-fire agreement, Iraq on Thursday began releasing 5,000 Kuwaitis held captive since the end of the Persian Gulf War, a Red Cross official said. A convoy of 30 buses carrying 1,135 Kuwaiti soldiers left Iraq on Thursday morning and began a 12-hour journey to a remote town in northern Saudi Arabia, Gabriele de Montmollin, spokesman for the International Committee of the Red Cross, said by telephone from Geneva.
NEWS
February 5, 1991 | Reuters
The Defense Department on Monday identified seven American servicemen who were killed in two separate air crashes Sunday during Gulf War missions. Three were Air Force officers killed when their B-52 crashed in the Indian Ocean near Diego Garcia when they were returning from a bombing mission. They were Capt. Jeffry Jon Olson, 27, of Grand Forks, N.D.; 1st Lt. Eric D. Hedeen, 27, of Malaga, Wash., and 1st. Lt. Jorge I. Arteaga of Trumbull, Conn. The three other crew members were rescued.
NEWS
February 4, 1991 | J. MICHAEL KENNEDY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Six U.S. helicopter crewmen were killed in two separate crashes, and three airmen were reported missing after their B-52 crashed into the Indian Ocean while returning from a bombing run over Iraq, U.S. military officials said Sunday. Also Sunday, Marine officials said seven of the 11 Leathernecks killed in a light armored vehicle last week and another Marine killed in a cluster-bomb attack Saturday were victims of so-called friendly fire.
NEWS
November 14, 1990 | Reuters
Britain suffered its first military fatality in the buildup against Iraq when one of its pilots crashed in the Saudi desert Tuesday. The Jaguar fighter-bomber was on a routine low-altitude training flight when it crashed about 100 miles south of Bahrain, a British military spokesman said. The pilot was identified as Flight Lt. Keith Collister of the 54th Royal Air Force Squadron.
NEWS
October 11, 1990 | DOUGLAS JEHL and JOHN M. BRODER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A series of after-dark crashes of U.S. military aircraft has exposed unanticipated problems in desert navigation, prompting some commanders to question whether pilots are fully prepared for possible night combat, according to military officials. The ability of U.S. pilots to wage war unrestrained by darkness was considered to be one of the United States' signal advantages over Iraqi forces. Most U.S.
NEWS
October 9, 1990 | DOUGLAS JEHL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ten American servicemen were believed killed in the crashes of three military aircraft Monday in the worst day of casualties in the region since the U.S. military buildup began in Saudi Arabia. Among the missing were eight Camp Pendleton-based Marines whose two Huey helicopters vanished abruptly from radar screens on a night mission over the Arabian Sea.
NEWS
November 14, 1990 | Reuters
Britain suffered its first military fatality in the buildup against Iraq when one of its pilots crashed in the Saudi desert Tuesday. The Jaguar fighter-bomber was on a routine low-altitude training flight when it crashed about 100 miles south of Bahrain, a British military spokesman said. The pilot was identified as Flight Lt. Keith Collister of the 54th Royal Air Force Squadron.
NEWS
March 22, 1991 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Complying with a cease-fire agreement, Iraq on Thursday began releasing 5,000 Kuwaitis held captive since the end of the Persian Gulf War, a Red Cross official said. A convoy of 30 buses carrying 1,135 Kuwaiti soldiers left Iraq on Thursday morning and began a 12-hour journey to a remote town in northern Saudi Arabia, Gabriele de Montmollin, spokesman for the International Committee of the Red Cross, said by telephone from Geneva.
NEWS
October 1, 1990 | Associated Press
Two Air Force pilots killed Sunday in the crash of an F-15 fighter plane during an exercise in Saudi Arabia were identified as California men, the U.S. military command said. The victims were identified as Maj. Peter S. Hook of Bishop and Capt. James B. Poulet of San Carlos, said Maj. Dan Schmidt, a spokesman for the Air Force Central Command in Saudi Arabia.
NEWS
September 4, 1990 | Reuters
A U.S. Air Force F-16 involved in the buildup in the Persian Gulf crashed Monday during a routine training mission in Saudi Arabia, the Pentagon said. A spokeswoman said the pilot ejected and was unhurt in the accident.
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