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Airplane Accidents Scotland

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NEWS
January 1, 1989 | From Times Wire Services
West Germany on Saturday denied a British newspaper report that the bomb that blew up the Pan Am jumbo jet over Scotland on Dec. 21 was smuggled aboard in Frankfurt, possibly by a Lebanese passenger duped into carrying it. Instead, authorities in Bonn said that initial results of the international probe indicate that the bomb was placed aboard Flight 103 in London, but provided no details.
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NEWS
March 31, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
Searchers recovered a second body near the wreckage of two U.S. Air Force F-15s that crashed in the Scottish Highlands, police said. The body, which has yet to be formally identified, was found close to the summit of Ben Macdhui in the Cairngorm Mountains, where the two jets crashed Monday.
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NEWS
December 26, 1988 | Associated Press
Soldiers and volunteers spent Christmas scouring the countryside for clues and victims from Pan Am Flight 103, taking a break from the grim search to join saddened townspeople at somber church services. No more bodies were found Sunday as low clouds and dismal weather grounded search helicopters, Deputy Chief Constable Paul Newell said. "Lots of our people are getting fairly tired," he said. He said some search dogs were retired for the day "because dogs don't go on as well as human beings."
NEWS
March 29, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
Rescuers working in blinding snow found wreckage of a second missing American F-15 fighter jet in the Scottish Highlands, the U.S. Air Force said. The search for the pilot was to resume today. The plane's tailpiece was found in the Cairngorm Mountains, about 400 yards from where the first of the missing single-seat planes and the body of Lt. Col. Kenneth J. Hyvonen Jr., 40, were found Tuesday, authorities said.
NEWS
November 19, 1991 | RONE TEMPEST, TIMES STAFF WRITER
He works behind bullet-proof glass windows in a tiny office hidden on one of the obscure, upper floors of the old Palais de Justice. He has no permanent staff except for a secretary. Stacks of working files litter his standard government-issue desk.
NEWS
May 12, 1989 | ROBIN WRIGHT and RONALD J. OSTROW, Times Staff Writers
U.S. intelligence officials were more than a little surprised last October when West German police released at least 12 radical Palestinians who had been arrested in connection with possessing highly sophisticated bombs. But the Germans protested that they lacked evidence to hold the radicals, who were members of the Popular Front for the Liberation of Palestine-General Command. Most had been in custody less than 24 hours. Now, U.S. officials believe those same Palestinians went on to orchestrate the bombing of Pan Am Flight 103 (originating in Frankfurt, West Germany)
BUSINESS
August 14, 1991 | From a Times Staff Writer
They were small changes that failed to draw much attention, but they were telling to former Pan Am flight attendant Lura Kuhlman. Little niceties--ranging from lettuce under the hors d'oeuvres to playing cards and books for children--began to disappear as the carrier's financial problems worsened, said Kuhlman, who retired from Pan Am in 1987 after 30 years. "It was all being eaten away around the edges," she said.
NEWS
March 27, 2001 | PAUL RICHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An Army reconnaissance plane crashed in Germany on Monday afternoon, hours after two Air Force fighters disappeared and were feared lost over the Scottish Highlands, U.S. military authorities said. An Army pilot and a crew mate were killed as their RC-12 aircraft, on a training mission from Wiesbaden, tumbled into a Bavarian forest about eight miles from Nuremberg. The two Air Force F-15C fighters disappeared during a low-level training flight over rocky northern Scotland.
NEWS
December 23, 1988 | DOUGLAS JEHL, Times Staff Writer
Amid growing speculation that an explosion caused the crash of Pan Am Flight 103, terrorism and aviation security experts said Thursday that the modern systems meant to ensure security of airports and airlines can do little to defend against a determined bomb-toting terrorist willing to die for his cause. While the cause of the crash remains unknown, the suspicion of a terrorist attack clearly underscores the vulnerability of the world's transportation system.
NEWS
July 21, 1996 | JONATHAN PETERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If the Trans World Airlines crash Wednesday stirs a familiar emotion, it may be the lingering memories of another air calamity that remains seared in the nation's memory: Pan American Airways Flight 103, blown out of the night sky over Lockerbie, Scotland, more than seven years ago. It was the tragic end of Pan Am 103 that revealed to the world just how sophisticated the technology of terrorism had become.
NEWS
March 28, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
Search teams found a body and the wreckage of an F-15 jet near a mountaintop in the Scottish Highlands where two U.S. fighter planes disappeared, the Royal Air Force said. The aircraft--each with one pilot on board--disappeared 45 minutes after taking off Monday from Lakenheath Air Base, about 70 miles northeast of London. The U.S. Air Force identified the men as Lt. Col. Kenneth Hyvonen and Capt. Kirk Jones. Their ages and home states were not given.
NEWS
March 27, 2001 | PAUL RICHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An Army reconnaissance plane crashed in Germany on Monday afternoon, hours after two Air Force fighters disappeared and were feared lost over the Scottish Highlands, U.S. military authorities said. An Army pilot and a crew mate were killed as their RC-12 aircraft, on a training mission from Wiesbaden, tumbled into a Bavarian forest about eight miles from Nuremberg. The two Air Force F-15C fighters disappeared during a low-level training flight over rocky northern Scotland.
NEWS
February 8, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
Lawyers appealed the murder conviction of a Libyan intelligence agent sentenced to life in prison for the 1988 bombing of a Pan Am passenger jet over Lockerbie, Scotland, in which 270 people died. The move had been anticipated since Abdel Basset Ali Megrahi was sentenced Jan. 31 by a special Scottish court in the Netherlands. Megrahi's alleged accomplice, Lamen Khalifa Fhimah, was acquitted and returned to a hero's welcome in Libya.
NEWS
February 2, 2001 | MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Libyan cleared in the bombing of Pan Am Flight 103 flew home Thursday to a warm embrace from his leader, Col. Moammar Kadafi, while Scotland's top prosecutor ruled out the possibility of bringing further criminal charges in the case any time soon. Chief prosecutor Colin Boyd said that the Scottish court's decision Wednesday acquitting Lamen Khalifa Fhimah and convicting Abdel Basset Ali Megrahi of murder in the 1988 bombing made it clear that Megrahi did not act alone.
NEWS
February 1, 2001 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush on Wednesday heralded the conviction of a Libyan intelligence agent in the bombing of Pan Am Flight 103 as a "victory for an international effort" to bring terrorists to justice, and he pledged to isolate Libya until it compensates families for the attack and ends all support for terrorism. Yet after 12 years of participating in a tightly coordinated campaign with Britain and the United Nations, the United States is itself isolated in its effort to make the government of Col.
NEWS
February 1, 2001 | MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Twelve years after Pan Am Flight 103 exploded over Lockerbie, Scotland, a Libyan intelligence agent was convicted Wednesday of murdering 270 people in the blast, but his co-defendant was acquitted and quickly headed for home in Libya. The guilty verdict for Abdel Basset Ali Megrahi, 48, was met with a collective gasp--and an emotional collapse--from victims' relatives and with stony silence from the Libyans' families in separate areas of the high-security court gallery.
NEWS
March 5, 1989
To the ordinary eye, the tiny scrap of material recovered from the rolling green hills near here looked like any other piece of charred metal. But to bomb experts searching for clues in the downing of Pan American Flight 103 as it flew over Scotland from London to New York last Dec. 21, the pattern of pitting and cratering on the metal suggested that it had been directly exposed to a high-intensity explosion.
NEWS
February 1, 2001 | MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Twelve years after Pan Am Flight 103 exploded over Lockerbie, Scotland, a Libyan intelligence agent was convicted Wednesday of murdering 270 people in the blast, but his co-defendant was acquitted and quickly headed for home in Libya. The guilty verdict for Abdel Basset Ali Megrahi, 48, was met with a collective gasp--and an emotional collapse--from victims' relatives and with stony silence from the Libyans' families in separate areas of the high-security court gallery.
NEWS
January 31, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
The judges in the trial of two Libyan men accused of the bombing of Pan Am Flight 103 over Lockerbie, Scotland, will announce their verdict today, a spokeswoman said. The three-judge panel will disclose its ruling when the court reconvenes at 11 a.m., court spokeswoman Bronwyn Vaughn said. Defendants Abdel Basset Megrahi and Lamen Khalifa Fhimah face life imprisonment if convicted of the murder of 270 people.
NEWS
January 19, 2001 | MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After 84 days of courtroom testimony, attorneys for two Libyans accused of bombing Pan Am Flight 103 completed their closing arguments Thursday and the panel of judges hearing the case began deliberations. Attorney William Taylor said the prosecution's case was based on "frayed and broken" strands of circumstantial evidence, and he urged the three Scottish judges to find the defendants not guilty. "The strands are mere threads," Taylor said. "Some are frayed.
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