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Airplane Accidents United States

NEWS
December 12, 1994 | JEFF BRAZIL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When the Federal Aviation Administration decides whether to toughen airline safety regulations, the agency faces a dilemma: It must weigh the cost of proposed reforms against the value of human lives lost if nothing is done. A life, the government calculates, is worth $2.6 million. For example, records show, the FAA passed a regulation in 1992 requiring low-altitude warning systems in commuter airplanes, but only after agency officials determined that failing to act would cost $95.
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NEWS
December 12, 1994 | JEFF BRAZIL and SHELBY GRAD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Patricia Saveall can still hear the words from the airport official who called that day: "The plane has gone down." The young mother screamed so loudly she awakened her 8-year-old daughter. "I told her Daddy had been in an accident, but we didn't know how bad it was," she said. Hours later, she learned how bad: No one had survived the crash.
NEWS
December 11, 1994 | JEFF BRAZIL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As USAir Flight 1493 prepared to touch down at Los Angeles International Airport on Feb. 1, 1991, passenger David Richman, a Harvard-educated college professor and proud new father, knew nothing about the potential danger of runway collisions. Nor did any of the other 33 people who were about to die that Friday evening. But the Federal Aviation Administration did know. As far back as 1983, records show, air safety experts had urged FAA action to do more to prevent runway accidents.
NEWS
March 11, 1991 | WILLIAM C. REMPEL and RICHARD O'REILLY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The skies were clear and the ride was smooth as a jetliner climbed out of Dulles International Airport on a sunny August Sunday bound for Indianapolis. So far, it was a day like any other in the skies of America. From Caribbean isles to the Southern California coast, passengers in U.S. air carriers were occupying cramped seats, eating from plastic trays and trusting their safety to the aviation professionals in cockpits and control towers across the nation. But not all of the roughly 17,000 U.S.
NEWS
February 16, 1991 | PAUL RICHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In its first formal response to the crash two weeks ago that killed 34 people at Los Angeles International Airport, the Federal Aviation Administration announced new rules Friday that will keep aircraft from waiting in runway intersections before takeoff. The rules, which take effect today, prevent air traffic controllers from allowing any aircraft to wait in runway intersections at night.
NEWS
July 20, 1989 | From Associated Press
The worst disaster in U.S. aviation history occurred 10 years ago when an American Airlines DC-10 crashed on takeoff from O'Hare International Airport. Flight 191 lost an engine on May 25, 1979, banked sideways out of control and slammed into a nearby field, exploding into an inferno. The furrow plowed in the field by the jetliner's left wing is still visible. The jetliner was reduced to scattered debris. All 258 passengers and 13 crew members were killed, as well as two people on the ground.
NEWS
January 13, 1988 | Associated Press
Major U.S. airlines in 1987 had the highest number of accidents in 13 years and the most deaths in five years while commuter carriers had their worst safety record of this decade, the National Transportation Safety Board reported Tuesday. The board said the large airlines had 31 accidents last year, including four involving fatalities, accounting for 231 deaths.
NEWS
October 22, 1987 | Associated Press
The number of near-collision reports involving commercial aircraft jumped nearly 50% during the first nine months of this year, according to Federal Aviation Administration figures. However, there was disagreement Wednesday among aviation safety experts on the significance of the increase.
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