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Airplane Hijackings Ethiopia

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NEWS
November 27, 1996 | From Times Wire Reports
Police refused to release two men arrested in the hijacking and crash of an Ethiopian jetliner, although Ethiopian investigators said all three hijackers died in the crash. Cmdr. Ismail Moegni Daho, the head of the paramilitary police in the Comoros, said the two men will remain in police custody while the investigation continues. He declined to give any details on the two prisoners or estimate how long the investigation will take.
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NEWS
November 27, 1996 | From Times Wire Reports
Police refused to release two men arrested in the hijacking and crash of an Ethiopian jetliner, although Ethiopian investigators said all three hijackers died in the crash. Cmdr. Ismail Moegni Daho, the head of the paramilitary police in the Comoros, said the two men will remain in police custody while the investigation continues. He declined to give any details on the two prisoners or estimate how long the investigation will take.
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NEWS
September 5, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Two men and a woman armed with grenades hijacked an Ethiopian jetliner on a domestic flight and forced it to land in Djibouti. There they released 50 people and then surrendered after holding four crew members for several hours. The three Ethiopians said they wanted to flee the undemocratic regime in their homeland, and they gave up after receiving assurances that they would be allowed to emigrate. No injuries were reported in the hijacking.
NEWS
November 25, 1996 | Times Wire Services
Mohamed Amin, a Kenyan TV cameraman acclaimed for bringing Ethiopia's catastrophic famine in 1984 to world attention, died aboard the hijacked Ethiopian Airlines Flight 961, which crashed in the Indian Ocean. Amin, 53, who worked for Reuters Television and lived in Nairobi, was one of Africa's top photojournalists. He won numerous awards in a career that spanned four decades. Amin's first dramatic pictures of Ethiopia's starving and dying jolted the world into a huge relief effort.
NEWS
November 25, 1996 | Times Wire Services
Mohamed Amin, a Kenyan TV cameraman acclaimed for bringing Ethiopia's catastrophic famine in 1984 to world attention, died aboard the hijacked Ethiopian Airlines Flight 961, which crashed in the Indian Ocean. Amin, 53, who worked for Reuters Television and lived in Nairobi, was one of Africa's top photojournalists. He won numerous awards in a career that spanned four decades. Amin's first dramatic pictures of Ethiopia's starving and dying jolted the world into a huge relief effort.
NEWS
November 25, 1996 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One engine had already stopped for want of fuel when the pilot told passengers to brace for a crash landing. Below, the Indian Ocean, gleaming azure, rapidly grew closer. To many passengers, it seemed that the end was seconds away. "We already knew that we were going to die," said N. B. Surti, a survivor from India. On Saturday, an Ethiopian Airlines Boeing 767 crashed into the sea off the Comoro Islands after it was commandeered by hijackers and forced to fly until its fuel tanks ran dry.
NEWS
August 30, 1992 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The daylong hijacking of an Ethiopian Airlines jet ended today when five men who had forced the aircraft on an odyssey that took it from Addis Ababa to Djibouti, Yemen, Egypt and Italy gave themselves up in Rome. Italy offered political asylum to the five gunmen, a senior police official in Rome said.
NEWS
November 25, 1996 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One engine had already stopped for want of fuel when the pilot told passengers to brace for a crash landing. Below, the Indian Ocean, gleaming azure, rapidly grew closer. To many passengers, it seemed that the end was seconds away. "We already knew that we were going to die," said N. B. Surti, a survivor from India. On Saturday, an Ethiopian Airlines Boeing 767 crashed into the sea off the Comoro Islands after it was commandeered by hijackers and forced to fly until its fuel tanks ran dry.
NEWS
March 19, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Security forces stormed a hijacked plane, killing two of the hijackers and ending a six-day standoff at an eastern Ethiopian airport. Sources said the 48-seat plane was hijacked last Friday by three men and a woman on a domestic flight and forced to fly to Dire Dawa, 210 miles east of Addis Ababa, the capital. Security forces surrounded it, and on Tuesday, 16 passengers escaped. The remaining 24 passengers and crew were freed by the security forces. The hijackers' demands were not disclosed.
NEWS
August 30, 1992 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The daylong hijacking of an Ethiopian Airlines jet ended today when five men who had forced the aircraft on an odyssey that took it from Addis Ababa to Djibouti, Yemen, Egypt and Italy gave themselves up in Rome. Italy offered political asylum to the five gunmen, a senior police official in Rome said.
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