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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 2, 2001 | JEAN GUCCIONE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Owners of noisy private planes that violate a nighttime curfew at Burbank Airport are now being fined $3,000. The nine-member Burbank-Glendale-Pasadena Airport Authority tripled the $1,000 fine for curfew violators last month. The increase took effect Thursday. The authority's curfew for older-model turbojets has been in place since 1981. It bans takeoffs and landings of those planes from 10 p.m. to 7 a.m.
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NEWS
April 4, 1992 | From Associated Press
The agency that manages federal aircraft has lost track of how many civilian planes the government has and what they are used for, investigators at the agency have discovered. The inspector general's office of the General Services Administration unearthed 237 federal aircraft unknown to the GSA by checking Federal Aviation Administration records, according to the report, which was obtained by the Associated Press.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 21, 1992
The Los Angeles Police Department has received a twin-engine airplane that was seized in 1987 during a drug bust in which officers also confiscated a large amount of marijuana. The Police Department will use the seven-seat Piper Navajo to transport investigators, witnesses and prisoners. LAPD detectives and U.S. Customs agents seized the plane after a yearlong investigation. The plane was held by Customs officials during 3 1/2 years of legal action.
BUSINESS
January 7, 1998 | From Washington Post
It's a measure of how competitive the commercial aviation business has become that the two global giants of the skies spent much of Tuesday arguing over which sold the most planes last year. Airbus Industrie, the European consortium that has proved to be a dogged competitor to Boeing Co., fired the first round, claiming in a news release that it had sold a record 671 planes in 1997.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 29, 2003 | ASHLEY POWERS, Times Staff Writer
In the canyons time forgot, men come to set their spirits a-flight. Necks craned, a dozen mostly middle-aged engineers follow their radio-controlled model airplanes as they dance across a blue sky. Each man has paid his yearly dues to soar his toy above the canyons, a kind of modern take on Peter Pan. The Trabuco Fliers' clubhouse is nestled in South County, circled by mounds covered with sagebrush and stone.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 13, 1990 | KRISTINA LINDGREN and TAMMERLIN DRUMMOND, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
It's hard to imagine anything more earthbound than an anteater. And, to the dismay of UC Irvine students testing their wings Saturday in an odd competition featuring grown-ups playing with radio-controlled planes, the Flying Anteater lived up to its namesake. It never got off the ground. Perhaps it was too much weight in the snout.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 1, 2000 | MARTHA L. WILLMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After six years and three months, George Heaven's dream of building the world's first rubber band-powered airplane capable of carrying a human is winding up. The Rubber Bandit, which has amassed a following of fans and naysayers from around the world, is finally finished. Heaven, a Woodland Hills aeronautical engineer who designed the craft, said he plans a secret test flight this month to gain certification from the Federal Aviation Administration.
BUSINESS
June 25, 1989 | JAMES BATES, Times Staff Writer
In Alfred Hitchcock's 1966 thriller, "Torn Curtain," Alf Jacobsen plays a ship steward delivering a radiogram to scientist Paul Newman. Five minutes into the movie, Jacobsen disturbs Newman and his fiancee, played by Julie Andrews, in their cabin with a knock on the door and hands Newman a slip of paper with a mysterious message on it. One minute and 10 words later, Jacobsen's part ends. Jacobsen, who acted under the name of Burt Brandon, gets a lot more movie action these days.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 1, 1993 | DAVID A. AVILA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Mitzi Farber is entering a field where women have not participated in numbers since Rosie the Riveter during World War II. And just as Rosie was handy with a riveter on the aircraft assembly line, Farber feels she can fix planes as adroitly as a man can and sometimes better. "Women are more subtle," said the 34-year-old single mother from Costa Mesa. "When men get frustrated they pull out a hammer and say, 'This will fix it,' and try to pound their way in instead of searching for a better way."
SPORTS
September 20, 1989 | RICH ROBERTS, Times Staff Writer
"You're down and armed," co-pilot Kevin McBride tells pilot Ron VanBenthuysen, who banks the plane over a ridge and dives into his run. The bomb-bay doors open, VanBenthuysen levels off, thumbs a button on his wheel and-- whoosh-- the plane drops its load. Fish away! Trout planting doesn't get any more sophisticated than this.
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