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Airport Safety

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 15, 1998
I operate a biplane sightseeing business and have flown out of Whiteman Airport for many years. Reporter Martha Willman talked to me on the phone about safety at Whiteman for 30 minutes but she apparently didn't hear a word I said. Maybe she didn't want the facts to get in the way of a good "story." Since I read her lengthy article raising numerous scary but bogus safety issues, I have done my own research on the National Transportation Safety Board Web site, looking for some evidence to support her article.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 24, 2013 | By Joseph Serna
The tires of a twin-engine Cessna that crashed at Santa Monica Airport last month were inflated and showed no signs of unusual wear, federal investigators have determined, debunking an early theory on what may have caused the plane to veer off the runway and into a hangar. There was also no debris on the runway, and the Federal Aviation Administration control tower reported that the pilot “did not express over the radio any problems prior to or during the landing,” according to a preliminary report on the Sept.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 7, 1988
A group of Torrance homeowners, worried about a recent spate of plane crashes, has called on city officials to tighten safety measures and crack down on pilots who violate a ban on late night and predawn use of Torrance Municipal Airport. The pleas by members of the Southwood Riviera Homeowners Assn., coming in the wake of three plane crashes last week, prompted council members to ask the city staff to study options for tightening controls at the airport.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 1, 2013 | By Dan Weikel and Angel Jennings
Santa Monica Airport is steeped in glamour and history. Douglas Aircraft Co. built its famous DC-3s there, and in 1924 it was the jumping-off point for U.S. Army pilots who were the first to circumnavigate the globe by air. The first woman to fly the U.S. Mail began her milestone flight in Santa Monica in 1938. More recently, actors Arnold Schwarzenegger, Tom Cruise, Harrison Ford and casino mogul Steve Wynn have been among the celebrities and business tycoons who have kept planes there.
NATIONAL
January 24, 2003 | From Associated Press
Problems involving baggage screening machines and security checks for foreign travelers persist at airports, government watchdogs said Thursday. Transportation Department Inspector General Kenneth Mead said some of the large machines that many airports use to screen checked bags for explosives give off too many false readings. He is investigating to make sure the machines are functioning properly. "We need to focus hard on the equipment," Mead said.
NEWS
May 2, 1996 | EFRAIN HERNANDEZ JR., TIMES STAFF WRITER
The FAA requires that air passenger terminals be at least 750 feet from the center line of the nearest runway. That requirement would be met if a new terminal (1) is built at Burbank Airport, officials said. Under a special FAA exemption, the existing terminal (2) is only 313 feet away from the east-west runway. Proponents say both projected passenger increases and safety justify building a new terminal.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 15, 1986 | KRISTINA LINDGREN, Times Staff Writer
Secretary of Transportation Elizabeth H. Dole said Monday that stepped-up airport security has helped to prevent terrorist incidents in the United States and added that key federal aviation safety personnel would be protected from the budgetary ax. But beyond encouraging individual nations to tighten security at international airports, Dole said the United States has little leverage except to bar entry to U.S. airports--an extreme measure so far taken only against Libyan and Lebanese airlines.
NEWS
October 3, 2001 | RICHARD A. SERRANO and RICARDO ALONSO-ZALDIVAR, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A key component of a Bush administration initiative to make air travel safer will address the largely untested security status of hundreds of thousands of employees at the nation's airports and airline companies.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 28, 1992
Jerry LeBoeuf, Manager, Anacapa Mobile Home Park A control tower would be ideal, but I don't think the airport is in a position to afford that. The main thing is that pilots need to be more careful. This is a very popular airport. There's no way of changing the takeoff and landing procedure the way we're situated here. Some of the homes that are close to the airport, those people probably could be relocated. I wouldn't want to live there. We're a little ways away, and yes, it's possible that someone could crash into our park, but it would either take a total collision or power failure to crash here.
NATIONAL
November 20, 1999 | Associated Press
An America West pilot ordered a runway evacuation after landing Friday because two passengers jiggled the cockpit door and asked suspicious questions during a Phoenix-to-Columbus flight. The two men, who had Saudi Arabian passports, were in custody but not under arrest, said Richard Morgan, chief of airport safety at Port Columbus International Airport. They had no weapons, he said. The men, whose identities were not disclosed, made no threats, Morgan said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 25, 2013 | By David Zahniser and Dan Weikel, Los Angeles Times
In a sign of the high stakes and hardening political positions surrounding a major runway project at LAX, two of the state's most powerful Democrats have come down sharply at odds on the issue. U.S. Rep. Maxine Waters, a foe of the plan to shift Los Angeles International Airport's northernmost runway 260 feet closer to Westchester and Playa del Rey, has gone public with her unhappiness with Rep. Henry Waxman, a colleague who supports the runway relocation. Speaking over the weekend to the Westchester Democratic Club, Waters depicted Waxman as someone who had joined "an unholy alliance" composed of organized labor and the Los Angeles Area Chamber of Commerce, which view the runway plan as critical to job creation and keeping the airport competitive.
NATIONAL
August 3, 2011 | By Christine Mai-Duc, Washington Bureau
Despite an appeal from President Obama, the Senate recessed without funding the Federal Aviation Administration, leaving nearly 4,000 "nonessential" workers on unpaid furlough and other "essential" employees on the job without pay at least through Labor Day. Airport safety inspectors, who enforce compliance with federal rules and are considered essential, have been asked to keep working and put expenses on personal credit cards. But the FAA insisted that safety is not affected because air traffic controllers, who are paid with separate funds, remain on the job. Obama called Congress' failure to resolve the situation "another Washington-inflicted wound on America.
OPINION
February 2, 2011
Seeing dollar signs Re "Billionaire brothers undermine democracy, demonstrators say," Jan. 31 Heaven forbid that brothers Charles and David Koch host a meeting to discuss conservative causes and how to support them. How undemocratic! Worse yet is that they contribute financially to those causes. Now comes the ultimate in hypocrisy when a retired teacher says: "It's putting democracy in the hands of people like the Kochs and others. It's not who you vote for; it's how much money you've got. " I guess he forgot about the teachers unions and others.
OPINION
November 22, 2008
If, heaven forbid, there should be a crash on Los Angeles International Airport's dangerously configured north runways, family members of the victims can be consoled by the knowledge that their loved ones died next to a really attractive new facility.
OPINION
September 24, 2004
If only Congress were as focused on improving security in the real world as it is in rearranging the bureaucratic architecture of the nation's intelligence community. Shockingly, three years after 9/11, airport screeners are still unable to prevent passengers from sneaking explosives and weapons onto airplanes, according to a recent government report on aviation security. Fortunately, they are at least able to protect the nation from British pop stars.
NATIONAL
January 3, 2004 | From Associated Press
The head of security at Washington Dulles International Airport was placed on administrative leave because of his arrest on drunk-driving charges as the airport was on a heightened state of alert New Year's Day for terrorist activity, the Transportation Security Administration said Friday. Charles Brady, acting federal security director at Dulles, was pulled over Thursday morning, hours after a British Airways jetliner was detained at the airport because of intelligence information.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 24, 2013 | By Joseph Serna
The tires of a twin-engine Cessna that crashed at Santa Monica Airport last month were inflated and showed no signs of unusual wear, federal investigators have determined, debunking an early theory on what may have caused the plane to veer off the runway and into a hangar. There was also no debris on the runway, and the Federal Aviation Administration control tower reported that the pilot “did not express over the radio any problems prior to or during the landing,” according to a preliminary report on the Sept.
NATIONAL
January 24, 2003 | From Associated Press
Problems involving baggage screening machines and security checks for foreign travelers persist at airports, government watchdogs said Thursday. Transportation Department Inspector General Kenneth Mead said some of the large machines that many airports use to screen checked bags for explosives give off too many false readings. He is investigating to make sure the machines are functioning properly. "We need to focus hard on the equipment," Mead said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 1, 2002 | CAITLIN LIU, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Starting today, Burbank, San Jose, Sacramento and Palm Springs airports will become the first commercial airfields in California to begin using federal security personnel to screen passengers and carry-on baggage, officials said. The four airports join more than 100 others nationwide that received federally hired and trained screeners for some or all of their terminals, officials said.
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