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BUSINESS
March 8, 2012 | By W.J. Hennigan, Los Angeles Times
Looking to take the next step in integrating drones into U.S. airspace, the Federal Aviation Administration has asked for public comments on the agency's selection process for picking unmanned aircraft system test sites. The FAA said Wednesday that the sites will play a key role in providing data so the agency can allow drones to fly in national airspace along with manned airplanes. The agency will accept comments for the next 60 days. Currently, drones are not allowed to fly in the U.S. except with special permission from the FAA. The agency has said that remotely piloted aircraft aren't allowed in national airspace on a wide scale because they don't have an adequate "detect, sense and avoid" technology to prevent midair collisions.
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BUSINESS
February 13, 2012 | By W.J. Hennigan, Los Angeles Times
With a growing fleet of combat drones in its arsenal, the Pentagon is working with the Federal Aviation Administration to open U.S. airspace to its robotic aircraft. As the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan wind down, the military says the drones that it has spent the last decade accruing need to return to the United States. When the nation first went to war after the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks, the military had around 50 drones. Now it owns nearly 7,500. These flying robots need to be shipped home at some point, and the military then hopes to station them at various military bases and use them for many purposes.
NEWS
December 11, 1987 | From a Times Staff Writer
The Soviet Union, in an unusually prompt action, expressed regrets Thursday for the violation of Japan's airspace by one of its air force bombers the day before. Foreign Ministry spokesman Yuri A. Gremitsky said the intrusion was caused by navigational problems during bad weather. He said that the Soviet Union will "take precautions to prevent such incidents in the future."
BUSINESS
July 5, 2012 | By W.J. Hennigan, Los Angeles Times
An expected proliferation of unmanned aircraft in U.S. skies over the next few years is generating concern among civil libertarians and citizens about safety and privacy, and the nation's drone makers are taking heed. The Assn. for Unmanned Vehicle Systems International in Arlington, Va., has published a code of conduct for manufacturers and operators of the thousands of drone aircraft that are expected to be flying in U.S. airspace by 2015. "We want everybody to know that this technology will be handled safely and with the utmost respect to individuals' privacy," said Ben Gielow, the association's general counsel and government relations manager.
NEWS
October 2, 2001 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
President Islam Karimov said on state television that his government will open its airspace to U.S. and allied aircraft. Uzbekistan is on Afghanistan's northern border. Karimov said his government will "make its own contribution to the liquidation of camps and bases of terrorists in Afghanistan and is ready to make its airspace available for this purpose."
NATIONAL
May 23, 2008 | Keith Herbert, Newsday
In an effort to reduce flight delays, the Federal Aviation Administration will allow commercial aircraft access to military airspace along the East Coast during the Memorial Day weekend, the agency's acting administrator said Thursday. Commercial planes will be allowed to fly in the airspace from 6 p.m. today until 7 a.m. Tuesday. The additional airspace will allow airlines to better plan holiday air travel as part of a larger effort to cut down on flight delays in the peak summer travel season, Robert A. Sturgell said.
WORLD
June 24, 2012 | By Patrick J. McDonnell, Los Angeles Times
BEIRUT - The Turkish military jet downed by Syrian antiaircraft batteries was back in "international airspace" when it was hit without warning after having inadvertently wandered into Syrian skies,Turkey'sforeign minister said Sunday. Turkish Foreign Minister Ahmet Davutoglu's comments to Turkey's TRT television directly contradict Syria's version that it downed the jet Friday less than a mile off Syria's coastal province of Latakia, in Syrian airspace. Turkey is calling for a meeting this week of its allies in the North Atlantic Treaty Organization to discuss the incendiary issue, which has ratcheted up tensions between two nations already deeply divided over Turkey's tacit support for rebels seeking to overthrow Syrian President Bashar Assad.
WORLD
April 19, 2010 | By Henry Chu, Los Angeles Times
Glimmers of hope for stranded travelers began appearing Monday with the reopening of scattered European airports and the announcement that one of Europe's biggest airlines would resume some intercontinental flights. Despite lingering ash in the skies from the Icelandic volcano, aviation authorities said that gaps in the cloud of grit in some places would allow for some movement in the air. Airspace across much of northern Europe remained closed Monday, but Britain announced that Scottish airspace would reopen Tuesday morning after five days of almost continuous closure.
WORLD
June 24, 2012 | By Patrick J. McDonnell, Los Angeles Times
BEIRUT - A day after Syria shot down a Turkish jet, officials from the neighboring countries moved to tamp down tensions Saturday as they mounted a joint rescue operation for two pilots still missing in the eastern Mediterranean. The incident dramatically escalated tensions between two countries whose relations were already severely strained because of Turkey'stacit support of the 16-month uprising against Syrian President Bashar Assad. But there was a notable lack of bellicose rhetoric Saturday emanating from both capitals, Ankara and Damascus, underscoring the explosive potential of the incident.
NATIONAL
April 8, 2013 | By Richard Simon, Los Angeles Times
WASHINGTON - Although the prospect of drones flying over U.S. cities is generating cries of spies in the skies, groups from California to Florida are fiercely competing to become one of six federally designated sites for testing how the remotely piloted aircraft can safely be incorporated into the nation's airspace. North Dakota boasts of its "minimal air traffic congestion. " North Carolina, whose license plates read "First in Flight," cites its aviation history. California pitches its diverse geography: desert, mountains and ocean.
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