Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsAkio Toyoda
IN THE NEWS

Akio Toyoda

BUSINESS
February 5, 2010 | By Coco Masters
As the first family member to lead Toyota Motor Corp. in 14 years, Akio Toyoda had a lot to prove, and his handling of the automaker's sudden-acceleration problems is testing his mettle. Nicknamed the "prince" by Japanese media, the 53-year-old grandson of company founder Kiichiro Toyoda took over as the youngest president in the company's history eight months ago after Toyota's biggest annual loss -- $4.4 billion for its last fiscal year. Despite his age, however, Toyoda's 25-year track record at Toyota -- he started as a junior manager and was the first in his family to take Toyota's management exam -- suggests that he's a strong manager with a fresh perspective.
Advertisement
WORLD
February 17, 2010 | Coco Masters
Announcing that Toyota is considering a recall of its high-selling Corolla subcompact model, company president Akio Toyoda on Wednesday gave his full backing to the company's chief of U.S. operations, who he indicated would attend congressional hearings in Washington D.C. later this month. Toyoda and executive vice president Shinichi Sasaki also confirmed Toyota's completion of preparations for recall repairs for the "Sai" -- a luxury hybrid sedan -- and Lexus HS250h vehicles in Japan.
BUSINESS
March 1, 2010 | By David Pierson, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
Reporting from Beijing — Apologizing several times and bowing twice, Toyota President Akio Toyoda spoke directly to the world's largest automotive market in a press conference here Monday to assuage fears about the safety of his company's vehicles. "The global recall has caused a lot of worries and confusion among Chinese consumers. We want to apologize sincerely," Toyoda said before bowing in front of hundreds of Chinese journalists. Flanked by seated Toyota executives, Toyoda stood stoically and read a prepared statement explaining that he rushed to Beijing as quickly as possible after his visit to the United States, where he spoke at a congressional hearing.
BUSINESS
March 2, 2010 | By David Pierson
Apologizing several times and bowing twice, Toyota President Akio Toyoda arrived in the world's largest automotive market to assuage fears about the safety of his company's vehicles. "The global recall has caused a lot of worries and confusion among Chinese consumers. We want to apologize sincerely," Toyoda said in a Monday news conference before bowing in front of hundreds of Chinese journalists. Flanked by seated Toyota executives, Toyoda stood and read a prepared statement explaining that he rushed to Beijing as quickly as possible after testifying at a congressional hearing in the U.S. last week.
BUSINESS
January 11, 2011 | By Jerry Hirsch, Los Angeles Times
Toyota Motor Corp. President Akio Toyoda said Monday that the Japanese automaker needed to add more excitement to the styling of its vehicles. Speaking to reporters at the North American International Auto Show ? his first visit to an American auto show ? Toyoda said, "I think cars need to be better looking. We are going to come up with better-looking, nicer cars. " One way Toyota plans to improve the design of its vehicles is by giving more authority to its design studios in the locations where the vehicles will be sold and produced, he said.
BUSINESS
February 6, 2010 | By Jerry Hirsch and Coco Masters
Seeking to quell the firestorm over Toyota's sudden-acceleration problems, the company's president issued a rare public apology Friday -- but one that analysts said was unlikely to deflect the increasing scrutiny of Toyota's actions. Facing unusually aggressive Japanese reporters, Akio Toyoda said he was "deeply sorry about the inconvenience and concern caused to our customers and others." Toyoda, grandson of the company's founder, said the automaker had reached a "moment of crisis" and would form a global task force to improve quality.
BUSINESS
December 24, 2008 | TIMES WIRE REPORTS
Toyota Motor Corp. President Katsuaki Watanabe may step down next year and be succeeded by Akio Toyoda, grandson of the founder of the largest Asian automaker, said people familiar with the matter. Watanabe's exit would be intended in part to take responsibility for Toyota's forecast this week for a 150-billion-yen ($1.7-billion) operating loss for the year ending in March, said one of the people, who asked not to be identified because a decision hadn't been announced.
BUSINESS
February 22, 2010
TODAY → Toyota to discuss the electronic throttle system in many of its cars. → U.S. Treasury auction →Quarterly reports from Campbell Soup, Lowe's and Nordstrom TUESDAY → Indexes due on home prices (S&P/Case-Shiller) and consumer confidence (Conference Board) → House hearing on Toyota's sudden-acceleration problems → Results: Macy's, Sears, Target WEDNESDAY → Government reports U.S. sales of new homes in January.
BUSINESS
February 24, 2010 | By Nathaniel Popper
Owners of recalled Toyotas who don't feel comfortable driving their cars to a dealer for repairs can have them picked up by the carmaker at their homes -- if they live in New York state, that is. Toyota USA also will give customers loaner vehicles at no cost while the repairs to prevent potential unintended acceleration are being made. New York Atty. Gen. Andrew Cuomo announced the agreement with the company Wednesday, saying it would affect the owners of about 500,000 Toyotas in the state.
BUSINESS
March 26, 2010 | By Jerry Hirsch
Toyota Motor Corp. on Thursday named a veteran manufacturing executive to lead its North American Quality Task Force, an internal group created to improve the quality of its vehicles in the aftermath of recalls to address unintended acceleration. Steve St. Angelo, executive vice president of Toyota Motor Engineering and Manufacturing North America, was named chief quality officer for North America and a member of an international Toyota quality committee. St. Angelo's appointment and the international committee are part of an initiative by Toyota President Akio Toyoda to address reliability and safety issues at the automaker.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|